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Index of the Suttas of the Samyutta Nikaya
Nidana Vagga
Dhatu Samyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

II. Nidana Vagga

PTS: Samyutta Nikaya Volume 2, Nidana-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1888. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Samyutta Nikaya Volume 2, Nidana-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version.
Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Sister Upalavanna, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on Cause, translated by Mrs. Rhys Davids assisted by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Book of Causation, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight.
BD: The translations of M. Olds
MNL: The trnslations of Sister Upalavanna.

III. Dhatu Samyutta, II.140

BD: It's Elementary Outline of Suttas 1-14, discussion
SN 2 14 1-10 Introduction
PTS: Kindred Sayings on Element, II.101
WP: Connected Discourses on Elements, II.627

I. Nanatta Vagga, II.140

Section I: Ajjhatta Pancakam

1. Dhatu Suttam, II.140

The Buddha defines the diversity of data (usually translated 'elements') as being the six senses, the six sense-objects and the six sense-consciousnesses.

PTS: Element, II.101
WP: Diversity of Elements, II.627
BD: Data

2. Samphassam Suttam, II.140

The Buddha states that the diversity of contacts arises from the diversity of elements.

PTS: Touching, II. 101
WP: Diversity of Contacts, II.627
BD: Impact

3. No ce tam Suttam, II.141

The Buddha states that the diversity of contacts arises because of the diversity in elements and that it is not that the diversity of elements arises because of the diversity of contacts.

PTS: And not in this way, II.102
WP: Not Diversity of Contacts, II.628
BD: Not If This

4. Pathama Vedana Suttam, II.141

Because of the diversity in elements arises diversity of contact; because of the diversity of contact arises diversity of sense experience.

PTS: Feeling, II.102
WP: Diversity of Feelings, II.628
BD: Sensation 1

5. Dutiya Vedana Suttam, II.142

Because of the diversity in elements arises diversity of contact; because of the diversity of contact arises diversity of sense experience; diversity of contact does not arise because of diversity of sense experience; diversity in elements does not arise because of diversity of contact.

PTS: Feeling 2, II.102
WP: Diversity of Feelings 2, II.629
BD: Sensation 2

Section II: Bahira Pancakam

6. Dhatu Suttam, II.143

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about the diversity of data.

PTS: Element, II.103
WP: Diversity of External Elements, II.630
BD: Data

7. Sanna Suttam, II.143

The diversity of data results in the reproduction of the diversity of perceptions, the diversity of perceptions results in the reproduction of the diversity of principles, the diversity of principles results in the reproduction of the diversity of wishes, the diversity of wishes results in the reproduction of the diversity of passions, the diversity of passions results in the reproduction of the diversity of quests.

PTS: Perception, II.103
WP: Diversity of Perceptions, II.630
BD: Perception

8. No ce tam Suttam, II.144

The diversity of data results in the reproduction of the diversity of perceptions, the diversity of perceptions results in the reproduction of the diversity of principles, the diversity of principles results in the reproduction of the diversity of wishes, the diversity of wishes results in the reproduction of the diversity of passions, the diversity of passions results in the reproduction of the diversity of quests it is not that the diversity of quests results in the reproduction of the diversity of passions, it is not that the diversity of passions results in the reproduction of the diversity of wishes, it is not that the diversity of wishes results in the reproduction of the diversity of principles, it is not that the diversity of principles results in the reproduction of the diversity of perceptions it is not that the diversity of perceptions results in the reproduction of the diversity of data.

PTS: And not in this way, II. 103
WP: Not Diversity of Quests, II.631
BD: Not If This

9. Pathama Phassa Suttam, II.146

The diversity of data results in the reproduction of the diversity of perceptions, the diversity of perceptions results in the reproduction of the diversity of principles, the diversity of principles results in the reproduction of the diversity of impacts, the diversity of impacts results in the reproduction of the diversity of sensations, the diversity of sensations results in the reproduction of the diversity of wishes, the diversity of wishes results in the reproduction of the diversity of passions, the diversity of passions results in the reproduction of the diversity of quests, the diversity of quests results in the reproduction of the diversity of gains.

PTS: Contact, II.104
WP: Diversity of External Contacts, II.632
BD: Impact 1

10. Dutiya Phassa Suttam, II.147

The diversity of data results in the reproduction of the diversity of perceptions, the diversity of perceptions results in the reproduction of the diversity of principles, the diversity of principles results in the reproduction of the diversity of impacts, the diversity of impacts results in the reproduction of the diversity of sensations, the diversity of sensations results in the reproduction of the diversity of wishes, the diversity of wishes results in the reproduction of the diversity of passions, the diversity of passions results in the reproduction of the diversity of quests, the diversity of quests results in the reproduction of the diversity of gains, it is not that the diversity of gains results in the reproduction of the diversity of quests, it is not that the diversity of quests results in the diversity of passions, it is not that the diversity of passions results in the diversity of wishes, it is not that the diversity of wishes results in the diversity of sensations, it is not that the diversity of sensations results in the diversity of impacts, it is not that the diversity of impacts results in the diversity of principles, it is not that the diversity of principles results in the diversity of perceptions, it is not that the diversity of perceptions results in the diversity of data.

PTS: Contact, II.104
WP: Diversity of External Contacts 2, II.633
BD: Impact 2

II.

11. Sattima Suttam, II.149

The Buddha teaches about seven data-sets: radiance, beauty, space, consciousness, nothing being real, neither-perception-nor-non-perception, and the perception of the ending of sense-experience.

PTS: These Seven, II.104
ATI: Seven Properties, Bhk., Thanissaro, trans.
WP: Seven Elements, II.634

12. Sanidana Suttam, II.151

The Buddha describes how sensual desire, deviance, and cruelty and their opposites arise from perception of information about things of a like nature.

PTS: With Causal Basis, II.105
WP: With a Source, II.635
See also: Let Go of 'Causation'

13. Ginjakavasatha Suttam, II.153

The Buddha teaches that it is because of data, the available information, that perceptions, views and thoughts arise.

PTS: Brick Hall, II.107
BD: Brick House, Olds trans.
WP: The Brick Hall, II.637
Discussion

14. Hinadhimutti Suttam, II.154

In the past, the future and the present beings gather together in groups based on similarities in their beliefs.
Here the idea that 'dhatu' is information or characteristic or property, not 'element' should have become clear. People do not go with the flow as though the flow were some river which carries them off, they flock together with those of characteristics similar to themselves.

PTS: Low Tastes, II.108
BD: Inclined to Flow Together or Birds of a Feather Flock Together, Olds trans.
WP: Inferior Disposition, II.638

15. Kamma Suttam, II.155

Many of the outstanding leaders under Gotama are walking back and forth followed by great numbers of disciples and the Buddha points out to the bhikkhus sitting around him that each is following a leader whos disposition is similar to their own. He then states that in the past, the future and the present beings gather together in groups based on similarities in their beliefs. This is an expansion of the previous sutta. There are links to biographical information on each of the leaders mentioned.

PTS: Conduct, II.108
WP: Walking Back and Forth, 638

16. Sagatha Suttam, II.157

The Buddha points out that just as muck blends with muck and milk blends with milk in the past, the future and the present beings gather together in groups based on similarities in their beliefs. A variation on the theme of the previous suttas.

PTS: [Sutta] with verses, II.109
WP: With Verses, II.640

17. Asaddha Suttam, II.159

The Buddha Points out that in the past, the future and the present people gather together in groups bsed on similarities in their beliefs: those with no faith in the Dhamma with those of no faith, those with faith in the Dhamma with those of faith. A variation of the previous suttas. The PTS Pali inserts the description of those with faith into the section on those without faith. It could be that this represents another way the sutta was to have been organized, but it is not developed that way in the rest. I have followed the BJT and CSCD. Mrs. Rhys Davids abridges in such a way as to obscure the way the sutta is organized. Both the Pali and Mrs. Rhys Davids translation have been properly unabridged here.

PTS: Unbelievers, II.110
WP: Lacking Faith, II.641

18. Asaddhamulaka Panca [Assaddhamulakatikapancaka] Suttam, II.160

Suttas 18-22 develop the theme begun in the previous suttas that in the past, future and the present people gather together in groups based on similarities in their characteristics in the form of a 'wheel' according to the following scheme (using Mrs. Rhys Davids Vocabulary):

18.: Unbelievers, unconscientious, unwise;
believers, conscientious, wise:
Unbelievers, indiscrete, unwise;
believers, discrete, wise;
Unbelievers, uneducated, unwise;
believers, educated, wise;
Unbelievers, lazy, unwise;
believers, energetic, wise;
Unbelievers, muddleminded, unwise;
believers, levelheaded, wise.

19.: Unconscientiousness, indiscrete, unwise;
conscientiousness, discrete, wise;
Unconscientiousness, uneducated, unwise;
conscientiousness, educated, wise;
Unconscientiousness, lazy, unwise;
conscientiousness, energetic, wise;
Unconscientiousness, muddleminded, unwise;
conscientiousness, levelheaded, wise.

20.: Indiscreet, uneducated, unwise;
Discreet, educated, wise;
Indiscreet, lazy, unwise;
Discrete, energetic, wise;
Indiscrete, muddleminded, unwise;
Discreet, levelheaded, wise.
21.: Uneducated, lazy, unwise;
Educated, energetic, wise;
Uneducated, muddleminded, unwise;
Educated, levelheaded, wise;
22.: Lazy, muddleminded, unwise;
Energetic, levelheaded, wise.

All this in the PTS translation is abridged down into one paragraph giving the titles and a description of the formula from which it would not be possible using it alone to figure out the actual scheme.

I don't know why people are not jumping up and down with delight at seeing these. Except, of course, that we are cool, and do not display our emotions in such a crude way. This is like looking back 2500 years and seeing the way people's minds were working and what they were taking delight in. There just is not anything even approaching this intimate view of another time in any other literature in the world. Simply marvelous!

PTS: The Five based on 'Unbelievers', II.111
WP: Rooted in those Lacking Faith, II.641

19. Ahirikamulaka Catukka [Ahirikamulakatikacatukka] Suttam, II.162

PTS: The Four based on 'The Unconscientiousness', II.111
WP: Rooted in the Shameless, II.641

20. Anottapamulaka Tini [Anottapamulakatikattaya] Suttam, II.163

PTS: The Three based on 'The Indiscreet', II.111
WP: Rooted in those Unafraid of Wrongdoing, II.642

21. Appassutena Dvi [Appassutamulakatikadvaya] Suttam, II.164

PTS: The Two by the term 'The Uneducated,' II.111
WP: Rooted in the Unlearned, II.642

22. Kusitam [Kusitamulakatikeka] Suttam, II.165

PTS: The Lazy II.111
WP: Rooted in the Lazy, II.643

III. Kammapatha Vaggo, II.166

23. Asamahita Suttam, II.166

The Buddha points out that people gather together in groups based on similarities in their characteristics. He identifies two groups with opposing characteristics that gather together.

PTS: The Unconcentrated, II.111
WP: Unconcentrated, II.643

24. Dussila Suttam, II.166

The Buddha points out that people gather together in groups based on similarities in their characteristics. He identifies two groups with opposing characteristics that gather together. Identical to the previous substituting 'vicious/virtuous' for 'unconcentrated/concentrated.'

PTS: The Vicious, II.112
WP: Immoral, II.643

25. Panca Sikkhapadani Suttam, II.167

The Buddha Points out that in the past, the future and the present people gather together in groups bsed on similarities in their charisteristics. Identical in structure to the previous but substituting the five precepts for the terms.

PTS: The Five Moral Precepts, II.112
WP: The Five Training Rules, II.644

26. Satta Kammapatha Suttam, II.167

The Buddha points out that people gather together in groups based on similarities in their characteristics. He identifies two groups with opposing characteristics that gather together. Identical in structure to the previous but substituting the last term for three on speech.

PTS: The Seven Courses of Action, II.112
WP: Seven Courses of Kamma, II.644

27. Dasakammapatha Suttam, II.167

The Buddha points out that people gather together in groups based on similarities in their characteristics. He identifies two groups with opposing characteristics that gather together. Identical in structure to the previous but adding three additional characteristics.

PTS: The Ten Courses of Action, II.112
WP: Ten Courses of Kamma, II.644

28. Atthangika Suttam, II.168

The Buddha points out that people gather together in groups based on similarities in their characteristics. He identifies two groups with opposing characteristics that gather together. Identical in structure to the previous but using what we have come to know as The Eightfold Path but which here is simply identified as 'Eightfold' or 'eight-dimensioned'. No 'Magga', no 'Ariya ~ Magga'.

PTS: The Eightfold, II.112
WP: The Eightfold Path, II.645

29. Dasangika Suttam, II.168

The Buddha points out that people gather together in groups based on similarities in their characteristics. He identifies two groups with opposing characteristics that gather together. It is interesting to note that although this sutta is, in the Pali, named 'Dasangika' 'ten-angika' and the previous sutta is 'Atthangika' 'eight-angika' (no 'magga') Mrs. Rhys Davids translates 'eightfold' and 'ten factors' while Bhk. Bodhi translates 'eightfold path' and 'ten factors'. I believe that in the same way we do not go around putting titles on the various conversations we have with people, that the suttas and such various lists as we find throughout the suttas were only given names when repeated reference to them made naming them a convenience. So it is a reasonable conclusion to think that what we have here is early relative to those places where the Eight-Dimensional Way or the Ariya Eight Dimensional Way and the (A)Sikkhapada are referred to by those names. Again to my mind this would tend to suggest that these 'tedious repetitions' were early, not later 'monkish' additions. This theory is confounded by the fact that in the first sutta (also found in the Sanyutta Nikaya) the 'Atthangika' is called ariyo atthangiko maggo. Could it possibly be that the first sutta was subject to 'monkish' tampering? To attain the Eye of Dhamma it is necessary only to have the first three of the Four Truths (to hear that 'this' is pain, that this pain has it's origin in thirst, and that it can be brought to an end by ending thirst), but the fourth truth, being the Way to do it, is not explained in detail sufficient to make it comprehensible. Even allowing that angikas 2-8 could be guessed at thinking the intent was 'the highest form in which these things are practiced) the first angika, 'ditthi' or 'view,' was unique to Gotama and would not have been known in any way prior to this utterance. But the fact is that the Magga is, in it's details, carefully and uniquely contstructed in units of intentional not-doing. No other contemporary set of instructions for attaining the goal of solving the problem of rebirth and pain in existence was constructed in this way. The Magga without knowledge of it's details is, if not useless in attaining the goal, almost as difficult a task as becoming self-awakened without a teacher. It leaves up to the individual to determine what, exactly is 'samma' 'consummate' this and that. And while that will in fact be helpful, it will not likely result in the intentional not-doing of all behavior intended to cause personal existence that is required for the goal. So this problem reaches another angika dimension: those places where it is given without the details look to be places where the details were assumed to be known or where it was assumed that they would be explained by the leaders of groups. Those places in the suttas where the details are given are relatively infrequent. All sorts of questions arise when thinking about this. Where were the details first introduced? Was the Magga itself a later compilation from the various angikas as developed individually or in groups? Why is there so little emphasis on the details of the Magga as a unit? Why the distinction between the eight-dimensioned and the ten-dimensioned? And why the change from 'fold' to 'factor'? What was the impulse that lead Bhk. Bodhi to insert 'Path' where it was not in the Pali? But as to that, just remember: 'a rose by any other name will smell as sweet.' This is all just a matter of curiosity.

PTS: Ten Factors
WP: Ten Factors, II.645

IV.

30. Catudhatu Suttam, II.169

The Buddha introduces the four basic bits of information we receive about things in the world: that things are Earth-like, Water-like, Firelight-like and Wind-like. PED gives one of the ideas in back of this term as dhatu, being the equivalent of 'dom' as in surf-dom. A footnote in the next sutta references the commentary in explaining the meaning as 'solidity, liquidity, heat, and motion.' Properties, characteristics, bits of information, not 'elements.'

PTS: The Four, II.113
WP: Four Elements, II.645
See: On translating 'Dhatu'

31. Pubba Suttam, II.169

The Buddha describes how it was through perception of the satisfaction in, problems with and escape from the characteristics of solidity, liquidity, heat and motion that he was assured that he had attained awakening and was no more to be subject to rebirth.

PTS: Before, II.113
WP: Before My Enlightenment, 645

32. Acarim [Assadapariyesana] Suttam, II.171

The Buddha describes how it was through seeking, finding and gaining insight into the satisfaction in, problems with and escape from the characteristics of solidity, liquidity, heat and motion that he was assured that he had attained awakening and was no more to be subject to rebirth.

PTS: I Walked, II.114
WP: I Set Out, II.646

33. Yo no cedam [No cedam] Suttam, II.172

The Buddha describes how if there were no satisfaction to be got from the properties of solidity, liquidity, heat, and motion, there would be no lust for them, how if there were no pain associated with them there would be no dissatisfaction with them, how if there were no way to escape from them there would be no escaping from them, but since there is, there is, and that it is only insofar as one has understood these things as they are that there is any living of the religious life and attaining to freedom. An apparently simple idea but one which is essential to understand to keep from swinging from the lust for the world that makes one blind to the problems of life to a hate for the world that makes one blind to the reasons one gets attached and bound up.

PTS: If There Were Not This, II.115
WP: If There Were No, 647

34. Dukkha [Dukkhalakkhana] Suttam, II.173

The Buddha describes how if there were no pleasure to be got from the properties of solidity, liquidity, heat, and motion, there would be no lust for them, how if there were no pain associated with them there would be no repugnance for them, but since there is, there is. If you didn't get it the first time, here it is expressed in another way.

PTS: Pain, II.115
WP: Exclusively Suffering, II.648

35. Abhinandana Suttam, II.175

The Buddha declares that he who takes delight in the earthly, the watery, the fiery, and the windy is not free from pain, but he who is free from such delight is free from pain. For my translation of this sutta I have taken advantage of the PED mention of the fact that the term 'dhatu' acts almost as the suffix 'dom' which I have extended to 'y' = 'iness', etc. and which it looks to me now to be for at least some cases where this term is used the best of all solutions. See also: SN 3.22.29

PTS: Taking Delight In, II.116
BD: Free from Pain, Olds, trans.,
WP: Delight, II.648

36. Uppada Suttam, II.175

The Buddha states that whatsoever is the arising of the Earthy, Watery, Fire-like, and Windy is just simply the arising of Pain and that whatever is the ending of such is simply the ending of pain.

PTS: Uprising, II.116
WP: Arising, II.649

37. Samanabrahmana Suttam, II.175

The Buddha defines what it means to be a shaman or a Brahmin in terms of understanding the satisfaction, pain, and escape from the Earthy, Watery, Fire-like, and Windy. The definition of the 'recluse and brahmin' is a recurring theme ending many chapters and books.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins, II.117
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins, II.649

38. Dutiya Samanabrahmana Suttam, II.176

The Buddha defines what it means to be a shaman or a Brahmin in terms of understanding the rise and fall of the Earthy, Watery, Fire-like, and Windy.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins 2, II.117
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins 2, II.649

39. Tatiya Samanabrahmana Suttam, II.176

The Buddha defines what it means to be a shaman or a Brahmin in terms of understanding earth, water, firelight and wind, understanding the way they arise, understanding the way that they end, and understanding the way to go to bring about their ending. This is The Four Truths verbatum except for the specific reference to the four dhatu. In other words what this is saying is that the four dhatu is another way of describing everything that exists.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins 3, II.117
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins 3, II.650


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Nidanasamyutta]  [Abhisamayasamyutta]  [Dhatusamyutta]  [Anamataggasamyutta]  [Kassapasamyutta]  [Labhasakkarasamyutta]  [Rahulasamyutta]  [Lakkhanasamyutta]  [Opammasamyutta]  [Bhikkhusamyutta]

 


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