Indexes Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as ASCII (aiumnntdnl). Alternatives:
[ IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Index to the Suttas of the Samyutta Nikaya
Maha Vagga
Magga Samyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

V. Maha Vagga

PTS: Samyutta Nikaya Volume 5, Maha-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1898. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Samyutta Nikaya Volume 5, Maha-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Great Chapter, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Great Book, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight,
BD: The translations of M. Olds.

I. Magga Samyutta, V.1

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on the The Way, V.1
WP: Connected Discourses on the Path, II.1523

 

I. Avijja Vagga, V.1

[1] Avijja Suttam, V.1

The Buddha explains in a paticca-samuppada-like style how blindness leads to shameful behavior and that gives rise to mistaken points of view which leads to false release. Where there is vision, 'seeing' the bad consequences of shameful acts, that gives rise to consummate point of view which leads to consummate release. Identical to AN 10.105

PTS: Ignorance, V.1
WP: Ignorance, II.1523
ATI: Ignorance

[2] Upaddha Suttam, V.2

Ananda, probably speaking of friendship with other beggars, declares that it is 'half of the Brahma life' to be associated with the lovely. Gotama corrects him saying it is the whole of the Brahma life, but he is speaking of a close association and companionship with the Dhamma.

PTS: The Half, V.2
WP: Half the Holy Life, II.1524
ATI: Half (of the Holy Life)

[3] Sariputta Suttam, V.3

Sariputta declares that it is 'the whole of the Brahma life' to be associated with the lovely. Gotama confirms him in this view.

PTS: Sariputta, V.3
WP: Sariputta, II.1525

[4] Brahmana Suttam, V.4

The Buddha explains how to understand the simile of the chariot.

PTS: The Brahmin, V.4
WP: The Brahmin, II.1525

[5] Kim Attha? Suttam, V.6

The Buddha insructs the bhikkhus in the way they should respond when asked why one lives the holy live under the Buddha, that is, that it is lived for the eradication of pain and that the Aristocratic Eight-dimensional Way is the walk to walk to the ending of pain.

PTS: To What Purpose?, V.6
WP: For What Purpose?, II.1526

[6] Annataro Bhikkhu Suttam, V.7

The Buddha insructs a bhikkhu in the meaning of the expression: 'Brahma's Carriage'.
That is 'Brahma-cariya'. Not really 'the holy life' or 'the godly life', possibly 'the best, or Brahma's ... behavior (except used better for bhava) conduct, deportment, comportment, manner, demeanor, mien, carriage, bearing ... 'carrying on like Brahma' the way Brahma carries himself. Carousing?

PTS: A Certain Monk (a), V.7
WP: A Certain Bhikkhu 1, II.1527

[7] Dutiya Annataro Bhikkhu Suttam, V.8

The Buddha explains a higher understanding of the expression 'The destruction of lust, the destruction of anger, the destruction of delusion. He then instructs a bhikkhu on the meaning of the expression 'The Deathless' and teaches him the way to the deathless.

PTS: A Certain Monk (b), V.7
WP: A Certain Bhikkhu 2, II.1528

[8] Vibhanga Suttam, V.8

The Buddha teaches the Aristocratic Eight-dimensional High Way giving brief summaries of the meaning of each of the steps of the way.

PTS: Analysis, V.7
WP: Analysis, II.1528
ATI: Analysis of the Path

[9] Suka Suttam, V.10

The Buddha likens success in attaining the aim of the Dhamma to the success of a spike booby-trap at piercing the foot: if it is badly aimed, it fails, if it is well-aimed it succeeds.

PTS: Bearded Wheat, V.9
WP: The Spike, II.1530

[10] Nandiya Suttam, V.11

The Wanderer Nandia asks the Buddha about what leads to Nibbana, results in Nibbana, has Nibbana as it's goal.

PTS: Nandiya, V.10
WP: Nandiya, II.1530

II. Vihara Vagga V.12

[11] Pathama Vihara Suttam, V.12

The Buddha lives in retreat for half a month living in a way similar to the way he did when first achieving awakening. When he emerges he relates his insights concerning the phenomena of experience to the bhikkhus.

PTS: Way of Dwelling (a), V.11
WP: Dwelling, II.1531
BD: Residence (1) Olds, trans.

[12] Dutiya Vihara Suttam, V.13

The Buddha lives in retreat for three months living in a way similar to the way he did when first achieving awakening. When he emerges he relates his insights concerning the phenomena of experience to the bhikkhus.
The question is: What is the meaning of this and the previous sutta?
Bhk. Bodhi footnotes with explanations as to what it is that is experienced as a result of each of the conditions, but this cannot be the message of the suttas. How come? Because if the message were the results of each of the conditions the suttas would be as pointless as they appear - they would conclude without having provided a path to Nibbana to make it a lesson. It does not go, according to this scheme, past the sphere of neither-perception-nor-non-perception. And still further there is no follow-up sutta which says: "And what, bhikkhus, is that experience?" which one would expect in the case of this having been a teaching in brief. I say again what I often repeat: We must seek the meaning of a sutta in the sutta as given. I suggest therefore the message is that with all these conditions, positive or negative, up to the point of having tranquilized desire, or thought, or perception itself, whatever the result, the result is experience. Just experience. Not the goal. In other words the message is precisely contrary to that implied by the commentaries, that is that the goal is not well served by concentration on attainment of the various intermediate steps. They happen, they are not the point.

PTS: Way of Living (b), V.12
WP: Dwelling 2, II.1532
BD: Residence (2) Olds, trans.

[13] Sekha Suttam, V.14

The Buddha defines the meaning of the term 'seeker.' (sekha)

PTS: Learner, V.13
WP: A Trainee, II.1532

[14] Pathama Uppada Suttam, V.14

The eight dimensions of the Magga only come together upon the arising of a Buddha.

PTS: By the Uprising (a), V.13
WP: Arising, II.1533

[15] Dutiya Uppada Suttam, V.14

The eight dimensions of the Magga only come together upon the arising of the discipline of the Well-gone (the Buddha).

PTS: By the Uprising (b), V.13
WP: Arising 2, II.1533

[16] Pathama Parisuddha Suttam, V.15

The eight dimensions of the Magga only come together upon the arising of a Buddha.

PTS: Utterly Pure (a), V.13
WP: Purified, II.1533

[17] Dutiya Parisuddha Suttam, V.15

The eight dimensions of the Magga only come together upon the arising of the discipline of the Well-gone (the Buddha).

PTS: Utterly Pure (b), V.14
WP: Purified (2), II.1533

[18] Pathama Kukkutarama Suttam, V.15

Bhadda asks Ananda about the path of unrighteousness (a-Brahmacarin). Ananda responds that it is the opposite of the Aristocratic Eight-dimensional High Way.

PTS: Cock's Pleasaunce (a), V.14
WP: The Cock's Park (1), II.1533

[19] Dutiya Kukkutarama Suttam, V.16

Bhadda asks Ananda about the Brahma manner and the goal of living in the manner of Brahma.

PTS: Cock's Pleasaunce (b), V.15
WP: The Cock's Park 2, II.1534

[20] Tatiya Kukkutarama Suttam, V.16

Bhadda asks Ananda about the Brahma manner, who is called one who lives in the manner of Brahma, and what is the goal of living in the manner of Brahma.

PTS: Cock's Pleasaunce (c), V.15
WP: The Cock's Park 3, II.1534

III. Micchatta Vagga, V.17

[21] Micchatta Suttam, V.17

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about the mis-directed way and the consummate way.

PTS: Perversion, V.16
WP: Wrongness, II.1535

[22] Akusala-dhamma Suttam, V.18

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about unskillful things and skillful things.

PTS: Unprofitable States, V.16
WP: Unwholesome States, II.1535

[23] Pathama Patipada Suttam, V.18

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about the contrary way to walk the walk and the consummate way to walk the walk.

PTS: Practice (a), V.16
WP: The Way, II.1535

[24] Dutiya Patipada Suttam, V.18

Whether layman or bhikkhu, contrary practice is contrary practice and leads to no good end; whether layman or bhikkhu consummate practice is consummate practice and is the method, the skillful practice of Dhamma and the walk to walk.

PTS: Practice b, V.17
WP: The Way 2, II.1535

[25] Asappurisa Suttam, V.19

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the difference between the good man and the not so good man.

PTS: The Unworthy (a), V.18
WP: The Inferior Person, II.1536

[26] Dutiya Asappurisa Suttam, V.20

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the difference between the good man and the one superior to the good man and the not so good man and the one inferior to the not so good man.
The lesson here being that it's bad enough to be doing everything in a misguided way, but it's worse still to think this has lead to liberation, and on the other hand it is not sufficient to be doing everything in the consummate way - one must also have consummate knowledge and attain freedom with such behavior.

PTS: The Unworthy (b), V.18
WP: The Inferior Person (2), II.1536

[27] Kumbha Suttam, V.20

The Buddha illustrates the steadying effect of the Eightfold Way on the mind by the example of two pots, one with a stand and one without. The one without the stand is easily knocked over.

PTS: The Pot, V.19
WP: The Pot, II.1537

[28] Samadhi Suttam, V.21

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about serenity that can be said to be accompanied by its sources and adornments.

PTS: Concentration, V.19
WP: Concentration, II.1537
BD: Serenity, Olds, trans.

[29] Vedana Suttam, V.21

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the Eightfold Path is to be cultivated in order to understand the three experiences: pleasant sensation, painful sensation and sensation that is not painful but not pleasant.
Woodward has reversed the meaning of this sutta to make it that the Magga is to be understood by understanding the feelings.

PTS: Feeling, V.19
WP: Feeling, II.1537

[30] Uttiya Suttam, V.22

The venerable Uttiya is taught about the five cords of sense pleasure: sights, sounds, scents, tastes and touches.
Woodward has reversed the meaning of this sutta to make it that the Magga is to be understood by abandoning the five, but it is that the five are to be abandoned by cultivation of the Magga.

PTS: Uttiya, V.20
WP: Uttiya, II.1538

IV. Patipatti Vagga, V.23

[31] Patipatti Suttam, V.23

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus how not to walk the walk and how to walk the walk.

PTS: Conduct, V.21
WP: Practice, II.1538

[32] Patipanna Suttam, V.23

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the one who has not properly walked the walk and the one who has properly walked the walk.

PTS: Conducted, V.21
WP: Practice 2, II.1539

[33] Viraddha Suttam, V.23

Whoever neglects the Eightfold Path also neglects the way to the end of Pain.

PTS: Neglected and Undertaken, V.21
WP: Neglected, II.1539

[34] Parangama Suttam, V.24

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the way to going beyond.
The question here is: Is this "a-para aparangamanaya sanvattanti," (Woodward's: "conduces to that state in which no further shore and no hither shore exist") or "apara parangamanaya sanvattanti" Bhk. Bodhi's "lead to going beyond from the near shore to the far shore")? Woodward notes that: At A. v, 233 the Buddha says the two shores are breaking and keeping the precepts. At A. v, 232 (as here) it is the right and wrong eightfold way. The issue is the nature of Nibbana. In these translator's terms: Is it a far shore or is it without shores?
The PTS Pali text is: "aparaparangamanaya; the CSCD has: "apara param gamanaya," the BJT is: apara parangamanaya.
I suggest: aparapara be expanded to: apara a-paran "leads from the not-beyond to beyond" ('shore' enters the translation only through the simile and the minds of the translators). This takes one off the near shore without placing one on a further shore. On the not-beyond they go back and forth in misery, beyond they do not. This comports with the simile of the raft. The Magga and the precepts are the steps to the beyond, they are not the beyond. Following the precepts and the Magga does not lead to a place where both shores do not exist. This would be holding the theory of annihilationism. Arahantship is known by knowing that there is no more 'it'n and 'at'n' (itthattan). The further shore is surely an 'at'n; the beyond the not-beyond is not.

PTS: Crossing Over, V.22
WP: Going Beyond, II.1539

[35] Pathama Samanna Suttam, V.25

The Buddha defines shamanism and the benefits brought about by shaminism.

PTS: The Life of the Recluse a, V.23
WP: Asceticism, II.1540
BD: Shamanism 1]

[36] Dutiya Samanna Suttam, V.25

The Buddha defines shamanism and the attainments of shaminism.
I do not see how 'samana' can be argued to be anything other than 'shaman'. That it is defined differently by the Buddha than it is commonly understood to be is nothing unusual. I further suggest that the term 'samanna-brahmana' originally indicated the distinction 'practitioners and scholars' with no prejudice intended. Even farther out on that limb, I suggest that 'samana' came down from 'samma' so that in the combination 'samanna-brahmana' what we really have is 'highest-er/best-er'.

PTS: The Life of the Recluse b, V.23
WP: Asceticism 2, II.1540
BD: Shamanism 2]

[37] Pathama Brahmanna Suttam, V.25

The Buddha defines Brahminism and the benefits brought about by Brahminism.

PTS: The Highest Life a, V.24
WP: Brahminhood (1), II.1541

[38] Dutiya Brahmanna Suttam, V.26

The Buddha defines Brahminism and the attainments of Brahminism.

PTS: The Highest Life b, V.24
WP: Brahminhood 2, II.1541

[39] Pathama Brahmacariya Suttam, V.26

The Buddha defines the Brahma manner and the fruits of the Brahma manner.

PTS: The Best Practice a, V.24
WP: The Holy Life 1, II.1541

[40] Dutiya Brahmacariya Suttam, V.26

The Buddha defines the Brahma manner and the attainments of the Brahma manner.

PTS: The Best Practice b, V.24
WP: The Holy Life 2, II.1542

Annatitthiya-Peyyalo

PTS: Of Other Views - Repetition, V.25

 

[41] Viraga Suttam, V.27

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.

PTS: Dispassion, V.25
WP: The Fading Away of Lust, II.1542

[42] Samyojana Suttam, V.28

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.

PTS: Fetter, V.25
WP 42-48: The Abandoning of the Fetters, Etc., II.1542

[43] Anusaya Suttam, V.28

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.

PTS: Tendency, V.26

[44] Addhana Suttam, V.28

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.

PTS: The Way Out, V.26

[45] Asavakhaya Suttam, V.28

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.

PTS: Destruction of the Asavas, V.26

[46] Vijja-Vimutti Suttam, V.28

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.

PTS: Release by Knowledge, V.26

[47] Nana Suttam, V.28

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.

PTS: Knowing, V.26

[48] Anupada Suttam, V.29

The Buddha explains how the bhikkhus should answer if questioned as to what the purpose is of living under his Dhamma-Vinaya and then questioned as to the way that purpose is to be attained.
The aim of living as Brahma is dispassion, destruction of the yokes to rebirth, rubbing out residual tendencies, reaching one's final conclusion, destroying the corrupting influences, personally experiencing the rewards of freed vision, attaining knowing and seeing, and attaining final Nibbana without fuel. Living as Brahma is accomplished by walking the Magga, and because of that each unit as well as the group as a whole makes a path to Nibbana.

PTS: Without Grasping, V.26

Suriyassa-Peyyalo: Viveka-Nissitam

PTS: The Sun - Repetition: Based on Seclusion, V.
WP: The Sun Repetition Series: Based upon Seclusion Version, II.1543

 

[49] Kalyanamittata Suttam, V.29

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Friendship with the lovely, V.27
WP: Good Friend, II.1543
BD: Friendship with the Good, Olds, trans.

[50] Sila Suttam, V.30

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Virtue, V.27
WP 50-55: Accomplishment in Virtue, Etc, II.1543
BD: Possession of Ethics, Olds, trans.

[51] Chanda Suttam, V.30

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Desire, V.28
BD: Possession of Wanting, Olds, trans.

[52] Atta Suttam, V.30

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Self-possession, V.28
BD: Self-possession, Olds, trans.

[53] Ditthi Suttam, V.30

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Insight, V.28
BD: Possession of View, Olds, trans.

[54] Appamada Suttam, V.30

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Earnestness, V.28
BD: Possession of Caution, Olds, trans.

[55] Yoniso Suttam, V.31

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Systematic, V.28
BD: Possession of Studious Etiological Examination, Olds, trans.

Suriyassa-Peyyalo: Raga-vinaya-Nissitam

PTS: The Sun - Repetition: Restraint of Passion, V.
WP: The Sun Repetition Series: Removal of Lust Version, II.1544

 

[56] Dutiya Kalyanamittata Suttam, V.31

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Friendship with the lovely, V.29
WP: Good Friend, II.1544
BD: Friendship with the Good, Olds, trans.

[57] Dutiya Sila Suttam, V.31

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Virtue, V.29
WP 57-62: Accomplishment in Virtue, Ect., II.1544
BD: Possession of Ethics, Olds, trans.

[58] Dutiya Chanda Suttam, V.32

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Desire, V.29
BD: Possession of Wanting, Olds, trans.

[59] Dutiya Atta Suttam, V.32

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Self-possession, V.29
BD: Self-possession, Olds, trans.

[60] Dutiya Ditthi Suttam, V.32

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Insight, V.29
BD: Possession of View, Olds, trans.

[61] Dutiya Appamada Suttam, V.32

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Earnestness, V.29
BD: Possession of Caution, Olds, trans.

[62] Dutiya Yoniso Suttam, V.32

Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: Systematic thought, V.29
BD: Possession of Studious Etiological Examination, Olds, trans.

Eka-Dhamma-Peyyalo I: Viveka-nissitam

Covering suttas 63-69. Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: The-One-Condition - Repetition: Based on Seclusion, V.30
WP: One Thing Repetition Series: Based upon Seclusion Version, II.1545

 

[63] Kalyanamittata Suttam, V.32

PTS: Friendship with the Lovely, V.30
WP: Good Friend, II.1545

[64] Sila Suttam, V.33

PTS: Virtue, V.30
WP: 64-69:Accomplishment in Virtue, Etc., II.1545

[65] Chanda Suttam, V.33

PTS: Desire, V.30

[66] Atta Suttam, V.33

PTS: Self-possession, V.30

[67] Ditthi Suttam, V.33

PTS: Insight, V.30

[68] Appamada Suttam, V.33

PTS: Earnestness, V.30

[69] Yoniso Suttam, V.33

PTS: Systematic Thought, V.30

Eka-Dhamma-Peyyalo I: Raga-vinaya-nissitam

Covering suttas 70-76. Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: The-One-Condition--Repetition: Restraint of Passion, V.30
WP: One Thing Repetition Series: Removal of Lust Version, II.1546

 

[70] Kalyanamittata Suttam, V.34

PTS: Friendship with the Lovely, V.30
WP: Good Friend, II.1546

[71] Sila Suttam, V.34

PTS: Virtue, V.30
WP: 71-76:Accomplishment in Virtue, Etc., II.1546

[72] Chanda Suttam, V.34

PTS: Desire, V.30

[73] Atta Suttam, V.34

PTS: Self-possession, V.30

[74] Ditthi Suttam, V.34

PTS: Insight, V.30

[75] Appamada Suttam, V.35

PTS: Earnestness, V.30

[76] Yoniso Suttam, V.35

PTS: Systematic Thought, V.30

Eka-Dhamma-Peyyalo II: Viveka-nissitam

Covering suttas 77-83. Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: The-One-Condition--Repetition, II: Based on Seclusion, V.31
WP: One Thing Repetition Series 2: Based upon Seclusion Version, II.1546

 

[77] Kalyanamittata Suttam, V.33

PTS: Friendship with the Lovely, V.31
WP: Good Friend, II.1546

[78] Sila Suttam, V.36

PTS: Virtue, V.31
WP: 78-83:Accomplishment in Virtue, Etc., II.1547

[79] Chanda Suttam, V.36

PTS: Desire, V.31

[80] Atta Suttam, V.36

PTS: Self-possession, V.31

[81] Ditthi Suttam, V.36

PTS: Insight, V.31

[82] Appamada Suttam, V.36

PTS: Earnestness, V.31

[83] Yoniso Suttam, V.36

PTS: Systematic Thought, V.31

Eka-Dhamma-Peyyalo II: ii. Raga-vinaya-nissitam

Covering suttas 84-90. Good friends, ethical culture, the wish to attain, self-knowledge, a view of the working hypothesis, being careful, tracing things back to their point of origin are all factors that herald the rise of the Aristocratic Eightfold Path.

PTS: The-One-Condition-Repetition II: ii. Restraint of Passion, V.31
WP: One Thing Repetition Series II: ii. Removal of Lust Version, II.1547

 

[84] Kalyanamittata Suttam, V.34

PTS: Friendship with the Lovely, V.30
WP: Good Friend, II.1546

[85] Sila Suttam, V.34

PTS: Virtue, V.30
WP: 85-90:Accomplishment in Virtue, Etc., II.1548

[86] Chanda Suttam, V.34

PTS: Desire, V.30

[87] Atta Suttam, V.34

PTS: Self-possession, V.30

[88] Ditthi Suttam, V.34

PTS: Insight, V.30

[89] Appamada Suttam, V.35

PTS: Earnestness, V.30

[90] Yoniso Suttam, V.35

PTS: Systematic Thought, V.30

Ganga Peyyalo I: Viveka-nissitam

Covering suttas 91-102. The Buddha likens the flow of great rivers to the way in which developing and making much of the Aristocratic Eightfold Way brings one to Nibbana.

PTS: Ganga - Repetition: Based on Seclusion, V.
WP: First Ganges Repetition Series: Based upon Seclusion Version, II.1548

 

[91] Pathama Pacina Suttam, V.38

PTS: Eastward a, V.32
WP: Slanting to the East, II.1548

[92] Dutiya Pacina Suttam, V.38

PTS: Eastward b.1, V.32
WP: 92-96: Slanting to the East 92-96, II.1549

[93] Tatiya Pacina Suttam, V.39

PTS: Eastward b.2, V.32

[94] Catuttha Pacina Suttam, V.39

PTS: Eastward b.3, V.32

[95] Pancama Pacina Suttam, V.39

PTS: Eastward b.4, V.32

[96] Chattha Pacina Suttam, V.39

PTS: Eastward c, V.32

[97] Pathama Samudda Suttam, V.39

PTS: Ocean (a), V.32
WP: 97-102: The Ocean 97-102, II.1549

[98] Dutiya Samudda Suttam, V.39

PTS: Ocean (b.1), V.32

[99] Tatiya Samudda Suttam, V.39

PTS: Ocean (b.2), V.32

[100] Catuttha Samudda Suttam, V.39

PTS: Ocean (b.3), V.32

[101] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.39

PTS: Ocean (b.4), V.32

[102] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.39

PTS: Ocean (c), V.32

Ganga-Peyyalo II: Raga-nissitam

Covering suttas 103-114. The Buddha likens the flow of great rivers to the way in which developing and making much of the Aristocratic Eightfold Way brings one to Nibbana.

PTS: Ganga-Peyyalo II: Restraint of Passion, V.32
WP: Second Ganges Repetition Series: Removal of Lust Version, II.1549

 

[103] Pathama Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward a, V.32
WP: Slanting to the East, II.1548

[104] Dutiya Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.1, V.33
WP: 104-108: Slanting to the East, II.1549

[105] Tatiya Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.2, V.33

[106] Catuttha Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.3, V.33

[107] Pancama Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.4, V.33

[108] Chattha Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward c, V.33

[109] Pathama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (a), V.33
WP: 109-114: The Ocean, II.1549

[110] Dutiya Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.1), V.33

[111] Tatiya Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.2), V.33

[112] Catuttha Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.3), V.33

[113] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.4), V.33

[114] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (c), V.33

Ganga Peyyalo III: Amatogadha-nissitam,

Covering suttas 115-126. The Buddha likens the flow of great rivers to the way in which developing and making much of the Aristocratic Eightfold Way brings one to Nibbana.

PTS: Ganga-Peyyalo III: Plunging into the Deathless, V.33
WP: Third Ganges Repetition Series: The Deathless as Its Ground Version, II.1549

 

[115] Pathama Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward a, V.32
WP: Slanting to the East, II.1549

[116] Dutiya Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.1, V.33
WP: 116-120: Slanting to the East, II.1549

[117] Tatiya Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.2, V.33

[118] Catuttha Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.3, V.33

[119] Pancama Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.4, V.33

[120] Chattha Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward c, V.33

[121] Pathama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (a), V.33
WP: 120-126: The Ocean, II.1549

[122] Dutiya Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.1), V.33

[123] Tatiya Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.2), V.33

[124] Catuttha Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.3), V.33

[125] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.4), V.33

[126] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (c), V.33

Ganga-Peyyalo IV: Nibbanannino-nissitam

Covering suttas 127-138. The Buddha likens the flow of great rivers to the way in which developing and making much of the Aristocratic Eightfold Way brings one to Nibbana.

PTS: Ganga-Peyyalo IV: Flowing to Nibbana, V.33
WP: Fourth Ganges Repetition Series: Slants towards Nibbana Version, II.1550

 

[127] Pathama Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward a, V.32
WP: Slanting to the East, II.1549

[128] Dutiya Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.1, V.33
WP: 128-132: Slanting to the East, II.1549

[129] Tatiya Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.2, V.33

[130] Catuttha Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.3, V.33

[131] Pancama Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward b.4, V.33

[132] Chattha Pacina Suttam, V.40

PTS: Eastward c, V.33

[133] Pathama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (a), V.33
WP: 133-138: The Ocean, II.1549

[134] Dutiya Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.1), V.33

[135] Tatiya Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.2), V.33

[136] Catuttha Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.3), V.33

[137] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (b.4), V.33

[138] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.40

PTS: Ocean (c), V.33

V. Appamada Vagga, V.41

Covering suttas 139-148. Nine similes for the caution that is the fundamental condition that leads to the bringing to life of the Aristocratic Eight-dimensional High Way.

PTS: Earnestness, V.33
WP: Diligence, II.1550

 

[139] Tathagata Suttam, V.41

PTS: Tathagata, V.33
WP: The Tathagata, II.1550
BD: Tathagata, Olds, trans.

[140] Pada Suttam, V.43

PTS: The foot, V.34
WP: The Footprint, II.1551
BD: The Foot Olds, trans.

[141] Kuta Suttam, V.43

PTS: The roof-peak, V.35
WP: The Roof Peak, II.1551
BD: The Roof-peak Olds, trans.

[142] Mula Suttam, V.44

PTS: Wood, V.35
WP: Roots, II.1552
BD: Root Olds, trans.

[143] Saro Suttam, V.44

PTS: Heart Wood, V.35
WP: Heartwood, II.1552
BD: Heart-wood Olds, trans.

[144] Vassika Suttam, V.44

PTS: Jasmine, V.35
WP: Jasmine, II.1552
BD: Jasmine Olds, trans.

[145] Raja Suttam, V.44

PTS: Prince, V.35
WP: Monarch, II.1552
BD: Kings Olds, trans.

[146] Canda Suttam, V.44

PTS: Moon, V.35
WP: The Moon, II.1552
BD: Moon Olds, trans.

[147] Suriya Suttam, V.44

PTS: Sun, V.36
WP: The Sun, II.1552
BD: Sun Olds, trans.

[148] Vattha Suttam, V.44

PTS: Cloth, V.36
WP: The Cloth, II.1552
BD: Cloth Olds, trans.

VI. Balakaraniya Vagga, V.45

Covering suttas 149-160. The Buddha provides twelve similes illustrating various aspects of the Dhamma.

PTS: Deeds Requiring Strength, V.36
WP: Strenuous Deeds, II.1553

 

[149] Bala Suttam, V.45

PTS: Strength, V.36
WP: Strenuous, II.1553

[150] Bija Suttam, V.46

PTS: Seed, V.37
WP: Seeds, II.1553

[151] Nago Suttam, V.47

PTS: The Snake, V.37
WP: Nagas, II.1554

[152] Rukkha Suttam, V.47

PTS: The Tree, V.38
WP: The Tree, II.1554

[153] Kumbha Suttam, V.48

PTS: The Pot, V.38
WP: The Pot, II.1555

[154] Sukiya Suttam, V.48

PTS: Bearded Wheat, V.39
WP: The Spike, II.1555

[155] Akasa Suttam, V.49

PTS: The Sky, V.39
WP: The Sky, II.1555

[156] Pathama Megha Suttam, V.50

PTS: The Rain-cloud a, V.40
WP: The Rain Cloud, II.1556

[157] Dutiya Megha Suttam, V.50

PTS: The Rain-cloud b, V.40
WP: The Rain Cloud 2, II.1556

[158] Nava Suttam, V.51

PTS: The Ship, V.40
WP: The Ship, II.1557

[159] Agantuka Suttam, V.51

PTS: For All Comers, V.41
WP: The Guest House, II.1557

[160] Nadi Suttam, V.53

PTS: The River, V.42
WP: The River, II.1558

VII. Esana Vagga, V.54

Covering suttas 161-170. The buddha explains how the Eightfold Path is to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of wishes, delusions, corrupting influences, existence, pain, closed-mindedness, flare-ups, sense-experience, and thirst.

PTS: On Longing, V.43
WP: Searches, II.1550

 

[161] Esana Suttam, V.54

PTS: Longing, V.43
WP: Searches, II.1559

[162] Vidha Suttam, V.56

PTS: Conceits, V.44
WP: Discriminations, II.1560

[163] Asava Suttam, V.56

PTS: Asava, V.45
WP: Taints, II.1560
BD: Issues, Olds, trans.

[164] Bhava Suttam, V.56

PTS: Becoming, V.45
WP: Existence, II.1561

[165] Dukkhata Suttam, V.56

PTS: Suffering, V.45
WP: Suffering, II.1561

[166] Khila Suttam, V.57

PTS: Obstructions, V.45
WP: Barrenness, II.1561

[167] Mala Suttam, V.57

PTS: Stain, V.46
WP: Stains, II.1561

[168] Nigha Suttam, V.57

PTS: Pains, V.46
WP: Troubles, II.1562

[169] Vedana Suttam, V.57

PTS: Feelings, V.46
WP: Feelings, II.1562

[170] Tanha Suttam, V.57

PTS: Craving, V.46
WP: Cravings, II.1562

170.2 Tasina or Tanha Suttam, V.58

The buddha explains how the Eightfold Path is to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of wishes, delusions, corrupting influences, existence, pain, closed-mindedness, flare-ups, sense-experience, and thirst.
There is a difference of opinion as to the arrangement of the suttas in this and the following vagga (or maybe it is just me). The PTS, CSCD and Woodward appears to arrange the suttas: Subject: Division (Comprehension, Realization, Wearing out, Abandoning): 3 versions of the 8-fold path without repeating the beginning of the sutta each time (seclusion, dispassion, deathlessness, nibbana). The BJT and Bhk. Bodhi (though abridged), have the organization as: Subject: Division I: 1 version of the 8-fold path, Division I, 2nd version of the 8-fold path, etc. then Division II, etc. I have followed the PTS organization as described above.

PTS: Thirst, V.47
WP: Thirst, II.1562

VIII. Ogha Vagga, V.59

Covering suttas 171-180. The buddha explains how the Eightfold Path is to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of the floods, the bonds, yokes to rebirth, ties to the body, risidual inclinations, sense pleasures, diversions, the fuel stockpiles, the yokes to lower rebirths, the yokes to higher rebirths.
In addition to the questions raised regarding the orginization of the previous chapter, the final sutta of this chapter, in the Burmese MSS B1-2 (and only it) includes at its end what is, in the case of Bhk. Bodhi's interpretation, the equivalant of I91; in the case of Woodward's interpretation a repetion of the entire sutta.
Taking a wild guess I suggest that there was in some original manuscript some abridged indication that there was to follow here some sort of final conclusion. A terminal knot. I suspect this is also the case with the end of the previous chapter and explains the inclusion of the second Sutta #170. What then I would conclude would be the final conclusion in both Chapters is what Bhk. Bodhi suggests for this chapter alone: a repetition of I91. This would then bring the number of 'takes' on the Eightfold path to five, and would show that the five takes were a progression which flowed, slided and tended towards Nibbana.

Putting together the repetition collections beginning with I49, if colors or symbols were given to each component part and they were laid out or woven together or arranged as a mandalla in the order of these suttas (and unabridged!!!), what we would see is a magnificant tapistry. I keep trying to encourage people to read these without skipping. Perhaps this is misguided. What would serve just as well would be to read them carefully enough to remember the sequence and then, in meditation, to reconstruct the whole. The vision of this work of art could then be seen in mind and it could never be forgotten.

PTS: The Flood, V.47
WP: Floods, II.1563

 

[171] Ogha Suttam, V.59

PTS: The Flood, V.47
WP: Floods, II.1563
ATI: Floods

[172] Yoga Suttam, V.59

PTS: Bond, V.48
WP: Bonds, II.1563

[173] Upadana Suttam, V.59

PTS: Grasping, V.48
WP: Clinging, II.1563

[174] Gantha Suttam, V.59

PTS: (Bodily) Ties, V.48
WP: Knots, II.1564

[175] Anusaya Suttam, V.60

PTS: Tendency, V.48
WP: Underlying Tendencies, II.1564

[176] Kamaguna Suttam, V.60

PTS: The Sense-Pleasures, V.48
WP: Cords of Sensual Pleasure, II.1564

[177] Nivaranani Suttam, V.60

PTS: Hindrances, V.49
WP: Hindrances, II.1564

[178] Khanda Suttam, V.60

PTS: Factors, V.49
WP: Aggregates Subject to Clinging, II.1565

[179] Orambhagiya Suttam, V.61

PTS: The Lower Set (of Fetters), V.49
WP: Lower Fetters, II.1565

[180] Uddhambhagiya Suttam, V.61

PTS: The Higher Set (of Fetters), V.49
WP: Higher Fetters, II.1565


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Maggasamyutta]  [Bojjhangasamyutta]  [Satipatthanasamyutta]  [Indriyasamyutta]  [Sammappadhanasamyutta]  [Balasamyutta]  [Iddhipadasamyutta]  [Anuruddhasamyutta]  [Jhanasamyutta]  [Anapanasamyutta]  [Sotapattisamyutta]  [Saccasamyutta]

 


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement