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Index to the Suttas of the Samyutta Nikaya
Maha Vagga
Bojjhanga Samyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

V. Maha Vagga

PTS: Samyutta Nikaya Volume 5, Maha-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1898. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Samyutta Nikaya Volume 5, Maha-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Great Chapter, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Great Book, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight,
BD: The translations of M. Olds.

II. Bojjhanga Samyutta, V.1

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on the Limbs of Wisdom, V.85
WP: Connected Discourses on the Factors of Enlightenment, II.1567
BD: Suttas Related to The Seven Dimensions of Awakening

I. Pabbata Vagga, V.63

[1] Himavanta Suttam, V.63

The Buddha likens the evolving growth of the bhikkhu in the Dhamma from it's base in ethical culture to the evolving growth of the great sea serpents from their birthplace in the Himalayas.

PTS: Himalaya, V.51
WP: The Himalayas, II.1567
ATI: The Himalayas (on the Factors for Awakening)

[2] Kaya Suttam, V.64

The buddha teaches the bhikkhus about the diversions and the things that help in the development of the dimensions of awakening.
I have always found this sutta to be particularly obscure in that in several places it seems to be self-referential and uninformative. "What is the food of the memory-self-awakening dimension? Things based on the memory-self-awakening-dimension." I did my translation to see if there was something in the Pali that was being overlooked, but the picture is not much clearer. It isn't that this doesn't make sense, or cannot be figured out, it is just that it does not much advance the story which is unusual. (Hint: I suspect it of having been partly forgotten and made up after.) Other than in the places where this occurs this is a valuable sutta for it's detail concerning how to manage the diversions (nivarana) and how to develop the seven dimensions of self-awakening (sambojjhanga).
Note: We can see in this sutta by the elaboration of 'dhamma-vicaya' that this is research into 'things', not research into 'The Dhamma.' Woodward's 'Norm'. I have also translated this 'The Dhamma' and also 'dhamma' and at this time I think I will not try to change what I have previously done as this points in any case to the ultimate goal of such research.

PTS: Body, V.52
WP: The Body, II.1568
BD: The Body, Olds trans.

[3] Sila Suttam, V.67

The Buddha describes how even just the sight of an Arahant can lead to Awakening or non-returning.
The translations of both Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi are easy to misunderstand. They give the impression that the whole sequence from first seeing an Arahant to attaining the result is virtually instantaneous. "When a monk, so dwelling aloof, remembers and turns over in his mind the teaching of the Norm, it is then that the limb of wisdom which is mindfulness is established in that monk. When he cultivates the limb of wisdom which is mindfulness then it is that the monk's culture of it comes to perfection." etc. Bhk. Bodhi: "Dwelling thus withdrawn, one recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over. Whenever, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwelling thus withdrawn recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over, on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness is aroused by the bhikkhu; on that occasion the bhikkhu develops the enlightenment factor of mindfulness; on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness comes to fulfilment by development in the bhikkhu." The idea is that when he starts one thing he has at that same time also started the next thing, to fully develop the first thing the second thing must be fully developed; when the first thing has been fully developed the other things are at that time also fully developed. Development is a circular thing; a revolving evolving enveloping developing.

BD: Ethical Culture, Olds, trans.
PTS: Virtue, Woodward, trans., V.55
WP: Virtue, II.1570

[4] Vatta Suttam, V.70

Sariputta describes the way he utilizes the Seven Dimensions of Awakening.

PTS: Practice, V.58
WP: Clothes, II.1573
BD: In Practice

[5] Bhikkhu Suttam, V.72

The Buddha explains the meaning of the term 'A dimension of Awakening'.

PTS: The Monk, V.59
WP: A Bhikkhu, II.1574
BD: The Beggar

[6] Kundali Suttam, V.73

The Buddha shows how guarding the senses culminates in giving up bad conduct of body, speech and mind which culminates in the culmination of the four settings up of the memory which culminates in the culmination of the seven dimensions of self-awakening which culminates in freedom through knowledge.
Details are given for each step. This is a very helpful sutta, especially in the description of guarding the senses which describes what is to be done in more than the usual detail.

PTS: Kundali, V.60
WP: Kundaliya, II.1575

[7] Kutagara Suttam, V.75

The Buddha likens the way that in a peaked-roof house, all the rafters slope towards the peak, aim towards the peak, terminate in the peak to the way when the seven dimensions of awakening are made a big thing of they slope towards Nibbana, aim towards Nibbana, terminate in Nibbana.

PTS: Peak, V.63
WP: The Peaked House, II.1577

[8] Upavana Suttam, V.76

The Venerable Upavana explains how by developing the seven dimensions of awakening one can know a pleasant way of living (that is, Arahantship).

PTS: Upavana, V.63
WP: Upavana, II.1578

[9] Pathama Uppanna (or Uppada) Suttam, V.77

The seven dimensions of awakening arise, but not without the appearance of a Buddha.

PTS: Arisen (or Arising), V.64
WP: Arisen (or Arising), II.1578

[10] Dutiya Uppanna (or Uppada) Suttam, V.77

The seven dimensions of awakening arise, but not without the appearance of a Buddha.

PTS: Arisen (or Arising 2, V.64
WP: Arisen (or Arising) 2, II.1579

II. Gilana Vagga, V.78

[11] Pana Suttam, V.78

As the posture of all breathing things depends on the earth, so awakening depends on the development of the seven dimensions of awakening.
Pana = 'breathers', breathing things.

PTS: Creatures, V.65
WP: Living Beings, II.1579

[12] Pathama Suriyassa Upama Suttam, V.78

Just as the dawn is the first sign of the sunrise, so friendship with the good is the first sign of the arising of the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: The Simile of the Sun (a), V.65
WP: The Simile of the Sun 1, II.1579

[13] Dutiya Suriyassa Upama Suttam, V.79

Just as the dawn is the first sign of the sunrise, so studious etiological examination is the first sign of the arising of the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: The Simile of the Sun, V.66
WP: The Simile of the Sun 2, II.1580

[14] Pathama Gilana Suttam V.79

Maha Kassapa is cured of a sickness by hearing the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Sick (a), V.66
WP: Ill 1, II.1580
ATI: Ill (Factors of Enlightenment), Piyadassi Thera, trans
Ill, Thannisaro Bhikkhu, trans

[15] Dutiya Gilana Suttam, V.80

Maha Moggalana is cured of a sickness by hearing the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Sick 2, V.67
WP: Ill 2, II.1581

[16] Tatiya Gilana Suttam, V.81

The Buddha is cured of an illness by hearing Maha Cunda recite the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Sick 3, V.68
WP: Ill 3, II.1581
ATI: Piyadassi Thera, trans

[17] Parangami or Apara Suttam, V.81

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the way to going beyond.
The sutta proper does not mention 'shores' as translated by both Bhk. Bodhi and Woodward. Woodward, by his translation inserts a contradiction between the sutta and the verses.

PTS: Crossing Over or No More, V.68
WP: Going Beyond, II.1582

[18] Viraddha or Araddha Suttam, V.82

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that neglecting the seven dimensions of awakening is neglecting the path to Awakening; undertaking the seven dimensions of awakening is undertaking the path to awakening.
The interesting thing about this little sutta is the fact that it refers to the seven dimensions of awakening as the 'ariyo maggo samma dukkhakkhayagami;' the Aristocratic consummate way to the end of pain'. Woodward here understands this to be a reference to the Eightfold Way and inserts 'Eightfold' which is not there. Bhk. Bodhi translates properly as 'the noble path leading to the complete destruction of suffering,' but makes no comment. Could the 'bojjhanga' have been the original "Magga"? Not according to the 'First Sutta'. What is the explanation? Woodward translates the same phrase correctly (as 'the Ariyan way that goes on to the utter destruction of ill') at SN 5.51.2 where it refers to the Four Iddhipada. 'Ariyaa Magga' appears to be a term that could be broadly applied. That is, could it be applied to any 'path' that lead to Nibbana.

PTS: Neglected and Undertaken, V.69
WP: Neglected, II.1582

[19] Ariya Suttam, V.82

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that making live, making a big thing of the seven dimensions of awakening conduces to the complete eradication of pain.

PTS: Ariyan, V.69
WP: Noble, II.1583

[20] Nibbida Suttam, V.82

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that undertaking the seven dimensions of awakening leads to a singular inability to abide, dispassion, ending, calm, higher knowledge, self-awakening, Nibbana.
The Dude would understand: its 'abide' in the sense of live with, not in the sense of 'tolerate'. Singular, Unique, Utter world-weariness: ekanta-Nibbida: one-ended-dis-abidability > vindati = to find or to know (as in 'I found that to be ~" > 'It was my pleasure to know" > possess, enjoy, so dis-enjoy > singularly unenjoyable). Woodward: 'downright revulsion'; Bhk. Bodhi: 'utter revulsion'. The problem with 'revulsion' is the implication that it is an emotion within. What is being spoken of is a perception that a thing out there is revolting. Like water rolling off a duck's back, the duck is not 'wetted' by the water. Dis-taste. Having no inclination to indulge. Having the idea, perception or knowledge, but not the sensation, that a thing is revolting.

PTS: Revulsion, V.69
WP: Revulsion, II.1583

III. Udayi Vagga, V.83

[21] Bodhana Suttam, V.83

The Buddha explains the meaning of the term 'dimension of awakening'.

PTS: Knowing, V.70
WP: To Enlightenment, II.1583

[22] Desana Suttam, V.83

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Instruction, V.70
WP: A Teaching, II.1584

[23] Thana Suttam, V.84

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that it is giving study to things which cause them to arise, or if arisen, increase, and that whether they are diversions or dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Conditions, V.70
WP: A Basis, II.1584

[24] Ayoniso Suttam, V.84

The Buddha teaches that not tracing things back to their place of origin results in the arising or increase of the diversions and the failure to arise or the disappearance of the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Unsystematic, V.71
WP: Careless Attention, II.1584

[25] Aparihani Suttam, V.85

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the seven dimensions of awakening are things that lead to non-decline.

PTS: Undeclining, V.72
WP: Non-Decline, II.1585

[26] Khaya Suttam, V.86

The Buddha teaches the Venerable Udayi that which destroys thirst and the way to practice to destroy thirst.
Woodward has complicated this sutta by inserting the qualification, per his understanding, of the remarks made by the Commentator, of 'rooted in craving.' Where the Pali says: 'Tanhaya pahana kammam pahiyati. Kammassa pahana dukkham pahiyati. 'Letting go Thirst, kamma is let go. Kamma having been let go, pain is let go,' he has "By the abandoning of craving action (that is rooted in craving) is abandoned. By the abandoning of action (rooted in craving) Ill is abandoned." Which he justifies with the statement: "To say that action as such should be abandoned would be contrary to the Buddha's 'doctrine of the deed.'"
This is a misunderstanding. The Pali does not say 'let go kamma', it says 'let go thirst'. The 'doctrine of the deed' is the view that kamma is a fact, that there are consequences that follow intentional acts. The view that there is no action necessary to become free from pain is 'the doctrine of non-action". To free one's self from pain it is necessary to act in a way which ends kamma which is the intentional action of not acting in response to tanha. It is kamma which ends kamma and thus is not 'non-action.' The end result is the end of kamma.

PTS: Destruction, V.72
WP: The Destruction of Craving, II.1585

[27] Nirodha Suttam, V.87

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about that which ends thirst and the way to practice to end thirst.

PTS: Cessation, V.73
WP: The Cessation of Craving, II.1586

[28] Nibbedha Suttam, V.87

The Buddha teaches Venerable Udayi that the seven dimensions of awakening are part and parcel to extraction of lust, anger and blindness.

PTS: Penetration, V.73
WP: Partaking of Penetration, II.

[29] Eka-Dhamma Suttam, V.88

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that there is no other single thing more effective at ridding one of the yokes to rebirth than the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: The One Condition, V.74
WP: One Thing, II.1587

[30] Udayi Suttam, V.89

The Venerable Udayi declares streamwinning.
A good, detailed example of the declaration of streamwinning by a bhikkhu.

PTS: Udayi, V.74
WP: Udayi, II.1588

IV. Nivarana Vaggo, V.91

[31] Pathama Kusala Suttam, V.91

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that whatever is skillful is based on being careful and being careful is considered the most skillful of skillful things. He then tells them that one who is careful will develop the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: The Good (a), V.76
WP: Wholesome, II.1589

[32] Dutiya Kusala Suttam, V.91

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that whatever is skillful is based on tracing things back to their place of origin and tracing things back to their place of origin is considered the most skillful of skillful things. He then tells them that one who traces things back to their place of origin will develop the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: The Good (b), V.77
WP: Wholesome 2, II.1589

[33] Pathama Kilesa Suttam, V.92

The Buddha likens wanting, deviance, lazy ways and inertia, fear and anxiety, and doubt and wavering to the way other metals degrade gold.
This group of terms is here called 'kilesas' 'the slimes', elsewhere these are known as the diversions, 'nivarana'.

PTS: Corruptions (a), V.77
WP: Corruptions (1), II.1590

[34] Dutiya Kilesa Suttam, V.93

The seven dimensions of awakening do not slime and if practiced and made a big thing of lead to the liberation by knowledge that is Arahantship.

PTS: Corruptions 2, V.78
WP: Non-corruptions, II.1590

[35-36] Yoniso Suttam, V.93

Not tracing things back to their place of origin allows for wanting, deviance, lazy ways and inertia, fear and anxiety and doubt and vascillation to arise and when such arises it proliferates; but when one traces things back to their place of origin the seven dimensions of awakening arise and when such have arisen they roll on to complete development.
The PTS Pali and the Woodward translation have this as two suttas. This is clearly wrong as separate, the first would have no reference to the dimensions of awakening which is the theme of this chapter. They are combined here as one sutta but for clarity in referencing I have retained the numbering.
I did my translation because to me the sutta reads 'tracing or not tracing things back to their point of origin, this arises, because it has arisen it is the source of further development.' Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi read this as 'tracing or not tracing things such and such arises and goes on to further development.' I think they have not traced things to their place of origin, but it can be read both ways.

PTS: Systematic (a and b), V.78
WP: 35: Careful Attention, II.1591
BD: To the Place of Conception, Olds, trans.

[37] Vuddhi (or Aparihani?) Suttam, V.94

Making a big thing of the seven dimensions of awakening results in advancement, not to decline.

PTS: Increase or Not decrease, V.79
WP: #36: Growth, II.1591

[38] Avarana-Nivarana (or Nivaranavarana) Suttam, V.94

The Buddha lists the diversions, then states how when one focuses one's mind on the Dhamma and is not diverted at such a time the seven dimensions of awakening can develop and come to completion.
Bhk. Bodhi has divided this sutta into two and states that his perception is that they deal with two different subjects. I read this as dealing with one subject: first the statement of the diversions, then the statement as to how when they have been eliminated the seven dimensions of awakening can develop.
What I believe is going on here and in the previous sutta but one, is that we are seeing the work of late editors trying to organize what was likely originally one long lesson into the ten suttas usually making up a chapter.

PTS: Restraint and Hindrance, V.79
WP: #37: Obstructions, II.1592
#38: Without Hindrances, II.1593

[39] Rukkha Suttam, V.96

Mighty oaks from little acorns grow! The Buddha likens the diversions to the seeds that produce great trees that dominate and destroy any small tree that is nearby. Then he points out that when the seven dimensions of awakening grow and reach fulfillment these diversions are eliminated and the practice culminates in arahantship.
The message of the striking image of the destructive powers of the small seed if allowed to grow is that even the person who has given up the world to become a homeless bhikkhu, if he still has even small traces of his former diversions and does not take measures to eliminate them is in great danger just because of the growth of mind made possible by the homeless life. An idle mind is the Devil's workshop

PTS: The Tree, V.80
WP: #38: Trees, II.1593

[40] Nivarana Suttam, V.97

The Buddha contrasts the Hindrances with the Dimensions of Self-Awakening.

PTS: Hindrance, V.81
WP: #39: Hindrances, II.1593

V. Cakkavatti Vagga, V.98

[41] Vidha Suttam, V.98

The Buddha states that whatever shaman or brahman in the past, future or present has or will abandon the notions 'better am I', 'equal am I', 'worse am I,' all did or will do so by making a big thing of the seven dimensions of awakening.
This is not some liberal meat-head coccamami commi pinko, egalatarian construction of an ideal mental state among beings: "we are all equals here!". It involves two perceptions: the first is the perception that there is no thing there that is the self not only of one's own, but of anyone; the second is that there being no self there of anyone in anything, there is no difference between any of it's elements in terms of self-importance and to hold that there is is an indication that one is not yet seeing things as they are, and hense is a 'conceit' as Woodward puts it. Bhikkhu Bodhi calls such a notion a 'discrimination,' thinking, presumably of the negative use of that word, but the situation here is not 'discriminating against or in favor of'. It is certainly reasonable within the context of seeking awakening for example, to discriminate between levels of accomplishment: that the Buddha's understanding is superior to, or that one's degree of awakening is inferior to or equal to those in the various stages. It is where notions of the self as having or possessing such or lacking such attainment accompanied by pride or shame or the idea of 'better' or 'worse' enter the picture that such notions become problematic. Otherwise the perception would be as detached as the cook's perception as to the donness of a loaf of bread in the oven: it's not a matter of better or worse, superior or inferior, but of having reached a certain point of development. Even the idea 'better for mankind' 'better for the world' is a value judgment placed over an opinion as to the existence of the world which depends on notion of self-in-existence.

PTS: Conceits, V.
WP: Discriminations, II.1594

[42] Cakkavatti Suttam, V.99

The Buddha describes the seven treasures of the Wheel-rolling King and the seven treasures of the Dhamma-wheel rolling Buddha.

PTS: Roller of the Wheel, V.82
WP: Wheel-Turning Monarch, II.1594

[43] Mara Suttam, V.99

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the way to destroy Mara's army is the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Mara, V.83
WP: Mara, II.1595

[44] Duppanno Suttam, V.99

The buddha explains the meaning of the expression: 'Dumb drip,' as being a person who has not cultivated the seven dimensions of awakening.
The Pali is: 'Duppanno ela-muga!' Bhk. Bodhi: 'unwise' (dup = difficult; [of] panna = wisdom; ? slack-wit, dim-wit, dim-bulb, half-wit, block-head, slow, dolt, dense, simple, thick-headed, numb-skull, bone-head, dope, empty-headed, nobody-home, space to let, feeble-mind, nit-wit, moron, unintelligent, brainless, lack-brain, stupid, dumb, dolt, oaf, dense, thick, dumb as a brick, hebetudinous, fat-head, blundering idiot, lunk-head, f--k head, feather-brain, weak-wit, sensless-, screwy, daft, loony, batty, sappy ...). Woodward: 'witless imbecile' (ela = drool, drivvle, drip, sap, boob; muga = mouth).

PTS: Witless, V.83
WP: Unwise, II.1595

[45] Pannava Suttam, V.100

The buddha explains the meaning of the expression: 'Wise, no drip,' as being a person who has cultivated the seven dimensions of awakening.

PTS: Intelligent, V.83
WP: Wise, II.1595

[46] Dalidda Suttam, V.100

The buddha explains the meaning of the expression: 'Hobo,' as being a person who has not cultivated the seven dimensions of awakening.
Dalidda. 'poor hiker', wanderer, vagrant. This should incorporate both the idea of poverty and the idea of wandering around. Migrant-laboror. The contrast naturally arises between such a one and the bhikkhu. For one thing, there is nothing in the term 'dilidda' that indicates that this sort of person does not do work for pay. Further than that, and deeper, though there have been some worldly-wise hobos, the further distinction is in the particular aim of the Buddhist bhikkhu to use this lifestyle as a tool in the search for awakening.

PTS: Wretched, V.83
WP: Poor, II.1596

[47] Adalidda Suttam, V.101

The buddha explains the meaning of the expression: 'No pauper!' as being a person who has cultivated the seven dimensions of awakening.
This is the negative (a-) of the term used in the previous sutta and is really 'non-pauper', but we have the expression 'He is no pauper' which fits here very well. 'Pauper' would probably be the best term to use there if it were not lacking in the element of wandering around. My feeling is that generally the better translation in these cases is to use the same term in both the positive and negative as this will most clearly support the closeness of the translation to the original. On the other hand the student should make himself aware that when two different terms are used for the positive and the negative, there is likely some divergence from the original intent in one or the other or both of the terms used. I suggest that the divergence here (the element of wandering around) is symbolic: One without the seven dimensions of awakening wanders around poor in understanding, one who possesses the seven dimensions of awakening does not wander around mentally and is wealthy in spirit.

PTS: Well-to-do, V.84
WP: Prosperous, II.1596

[48] Adicca Suttam, V.101

Just as the dawn is an early sign of the rising of the sun, so friendship with the good is an early sign of the appearance of the seven dimensions of awakening.
Birds of a feather flock together. Take a look around, are you friends with the good? Or do you have corrupt companions? If you can find no one you can be friendly with that appears to you to be intent on the good, then walk alone, 'like the bull elephant in the jungle keeping shy of the herd'. The whole issue of your being here in existence in the world is for the sake of companionship. If you cannot make that into an experience of the highest order, then the next most valuable thing you should do is cultivate the ability to tolerate loneliness. In any case the basis of companionship of the highest order is the mutual cultivation of detachment built on the appreciation of solitude. This is what should be understood as what is meant by 'the good'. That is, that it is ultimately not something to be sought for in persons, but in mental attitude. If one's companion is the appreciation of solitude, how can one ever be alone?

PTS: The Sun, V.84
WP: The Sun, II.1596

[49] Pathama Anga Suttam, V.101

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that as far as internal factors go, he sees no single other factor so important for the development of the seven dimensions of awakening as that of tracing things back to their place of origin.

PTS: Factor (a), V.84
WP: Internal Factor, II.1596

[50] Dutiya Anga Suttam, V.102

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that as far as external factors go, he sees no single other factor so important for the development of the seven dimensions of awakening as that of friendship with the good.

PTS: Factor (b), V.85
WP: External Factor, II.1597

VI. Bojjangasakacca Vagga, V.102

[51] Ahara Suttam, V.102

The Buddha teaches what is and what is not a food for the diversions (nivarana) and for the seven dimensions of self-awakening (satta sambojjhanga).

PTS: Food, V.85
ATI: Food (for the Factors of Awakening), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: Nutriment, 1597.

[52] Pariyaya Suttam, V.108

The exact similarity in the outward form of the practices of a group of ascetics with one method of instruction used by The Buddha leads to the question of what is the difference between the two sects. The Buddha reveals an interpretation of the doctrine unique to the understanding of the awakened mind, inaccesable through any other source.
A very rich, complex sutta. A lesson in how a complete path to the goal can be constructed in unlimited ways by the fitting together of various individual components of the Dhamma: in this sutta the Diversions [nivarana] and the Dimensions of Awakening [sambojjhanga]. Then the further flexibility of the system is shown by splitting in two the individual components of these Dhammas in various instructive ways.

PTS: The Method, V.90
WP: A Method of Exposition, II.1602

[53] Aggi Suttam, V.112

The exact similarity in the outward form of the practices of a group of ascetics with one method of instruction used by The Buddha leads to the question of what is the difference between the two sects. The Buddha reveals an interpretation of the doctrine unique to the understanding of the awakened mind, inaccesable through any other source.
In this case a very useful method for balancing the mind betweeen being sluggish and being over-excited.

PTS: Fire, V.95
WP: Fire, II.1605
ATI: Fire, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[54] Metta Suttam, V.115

The Buddha develops the four Brahma Viharas by way of the Seven Dimensions of Self-awakening showing the scope and maximum accomplishment successively of the thorough practice of projecting friendliness, compassion, empathy and detachment while developing memory, Dhamma-investigation, energy building, entheusiasm, impassivity, serenity, and detachment.
One of the most informative descriptions of the use of the Four Brahma-viharas. Here it is shown how it is to be used in conjunction with the seven dimensions of awakening. Also given are the results in each of the four of the practice when it falls short of complete freedom in Arahantship.
It is a wide-spread practice today [Wednesday, March 05, 2014 6:39 AM] to teach 'loving kindness' without the other three Brahma Viharas and with little or no reference to the other important doctrines of the system. Here it is made clear that however much this is a beneficial practice, it's final result is limited. One should not rest contented at this level! Here is a method for going deeper.
The BJT Pali text beginning at §12 where the Brahma-viharas are linked to the Sambojjhangas, is completely unrelated to this sutta as found in the PTS Pali, the CSCD or the Pali text used by Bhk. Bodhi.

PTS: Goodwill, V. 98
WP: Accompanied by Lovingkindness, II.1607

[55] Sangarava Suttam, V.121

The conversion of Sangarava the Brahmin. Sangarava asks the Buddha why it is that sometimes things that one has studied for a long time cannot be remembered and why sometimes things one has not studied are clear in mind.
I think that missing from the current translations is the fact that what is being spoken of is not simply remembering things one has only just casually glanced at, but is also recollecting things one has not previously seen at all. Sangarava is concerned with mantas, (mantras) or magic charms or spells, but this is something that concerns seeing in mind of any sort.

PTS: Sangarava, V.102
WP: Sangarava, II.1611

[56] Abhaya Suttam, V.126

Prince Abhaya of the Lacchavi visits the Buddha on Vulture-head Mountain. There he asks what the Buddha has to say in regard to Purana Kassapa's doctrine that there is no driving force that results in not knowing and seeing things as they are nor in seeing things as they are. The Buddha replies that wanting, deviance, lazy ways and inertia, fear and anxiety, and uncertainty and vascillation (the diversions) result in not knowing and seeing things as they are, that the seven dimensions of awakening result in seeing things as they are.

PTS: Abhaya, V.107
WP: Abhaya, II.

VII. Anapana Vagga, V.129

[57] Atthika Suttam, V.129

Developing perception of the skeleton produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.
Woodward calls this 'the idea of the skeleton', Bhk. Bodhi: 'the perception of a skeleton'. I suggest the so-called 'after image' of the skeleton (a vision of the image of a great huge skeleton reclining in the cosmos) does not require having seen a real skeleton. (In the long distant past we have seen enough of skeletons!) Further, the message of the sutta is not that the goal is this image, but that in perceiving the skeleton when accompanied by the seven dimensions of awakening, the inference should be drawn that 'This body of mine, too, is just like that, is constructed just like that, has not got beyond the fate of that,' and that seeing that, any desire for body, ambition with regard to body is let go. Again I suggest that this is the meaning of: 'Living in a body, one regards body as body.' That is that we see body as it is, a thing subject to ending.

PTS: The Skeleton, V.109
WP: The Skeleton, II.1617

[58] Pulavaka Suttam, V.131

Developing perception of the worm-eaten corpse produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Worm-Eaten, V.111
WP: The Worm-Infested, II.1619

[59] Vinilaka Suttam, V.131

Developing perception of the discolored corpse produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Discoloured, V.111
WP: The Livid, II.1619

[60] Vicchiddaka Suttam, V.131

Developing perception of the fissured corpse produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: The Fissured, V.111
WP: The Fissured, II.1619

[61] Uddhumataka Suttam, V.131

Developing perception of the inflated corpse produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: The Inflated, V.111
WP: The Bloated, II.1619

[62] Metta Suttam, V.131

Developing friendly vibrations produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Goodwill, V.112
WP: Lovingkindness, II.1619

[63] Karuna Suttam, V.131

Developing sympathetic vibrations produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Compassion, V.112
WP: Compassion, II.1619

[64] Mudita Suttam, V.131

Developing empathetic vibrations produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Sympathy, V.112
WP: Altruistic Joy, II.1619

[65] Upekha Suttam, V.131

Developing detachment produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Equanimity, V.112
WP: Equanimity, II.1619

 

Pali Olds Woodward Bhk. Bodhi
Metta Friendliness Goodwill Loving Kindness
Karuna Sympathy Compassion Compassion
Mudita Empathy Sympathy Altruistic Joy
Upekha Detachment Equanimity Equanimity

 

[66] Anapana Suttam, V.132

Minding the in-and-exhalations produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Inbreathing and outbreathing, V.112
WP: Breathing, II.1620

VIII. Nirodha Vagga, V.132

[67] Asubha Suttam, V.132

Perception of the foul produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: The Foul, V.112
WP: Foulness, II.1620

[68] Marana Suttam, V.132

Perception of death produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Death, V.112
WP: Death, II.1620

[69] Patikkula Suttam, V.132

Perception of the repulive in food produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: The Repulsive, V.112
WP: Repulsiveness of Food, II.1620

[70] Anabhirati (or Sabbaloke) Suttam, V.132

Perception of distaste for the whole world produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Distaste or All the world, V.113
WP: Nondelight, II.1620

[71] Anicca Suttam, V.132

Perception of impermanence produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Impermanent, V.113
WP: Impermanence, II.1620

[72] Dukkha Suttam, V.132

Perception of pain in impermanence produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Ill, V.113
WP: Suffering, II.1620

[73] Anatta Suttam, V.133

Perception of not-self in the painful produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Not Self, V.113
WP: Nonself, II.1620

[74] Pahana Suttam, V.133

Perception of the advantages of letting go produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Abandoning, V.113
WP: Abandonment, II.1620

[75] Viraga Suttam, V.133

Perception of dispassion produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Dispassion, V.113
WP: Dispassion, II.1621

[76] Nirodha Suttam, V.133

Perception of ending produces great fruit, great benefits, either arahantship or non-returning, omniscience, psychic attainments, destruction of yokes, being greatly moved, and pleasant living in the present.

PTS: Cessation, V.113
WP: Cessation, II.1621

 

Note: There is confusion between versions in the following sub-chapters of this chapter. My reading is that the lot should follow the organization of SN 5.45 which is itself confused between versions but which I believe is properly straightened out in the version provided here. That yields the following scheme:

IX. Ganga Repetition

Eastward (a) Ganges based on seclusion flowing to Nibbana
Eastward (b.1) Yamuna
Eastward (b.2) Aciravati
Eastward (b.3) Sarabhu
Eastward (b.4) Mahi
Eastward (c) Ganges, Yamuna, Aciravati, Sarabhu, Mahi
Ocean (a) Ganges based on seclusion flowing to Nibbana
Ocean (b.1) Yamuna
Ocean (b.2) Aciravati
Ocean (b.3) Sarabhu
Ocean (b.4) Mahi
Ocean (c) Ganges, Yamuna, Aciravati, Sarabhu, Mahi

X. Earnestness

Tathagata

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

The Foot

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

The Roof-peak ... etc.

XI. Deeds Requiring Strength

Strength

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

Seed

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

The Snake ... etc.

XII. Longing

Longing

a. Full Comprehension

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

b. Realization

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

c. Wearing Out

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

d. Abandoning

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

Conceits

a. Full Comprehension

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

b. Realization

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

c. Wearing Out

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

d. Abandoning

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

Asava ... etc. ...

XIII. The Flood

The Flood

a. Full Comprehension

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

b. Realization

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

c. Wearing Out

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

d. Abandoning

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

Bond

a. Full Comprehension

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

b. Realization

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

c. Wearing Out

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

d. Abandoning

i. Seclusion
ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion
iii. Ending in the Deathless
iv. Ending in Nibbana

Grasping ... etc. ...

PTS Pali and Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi translations would break up sub-chapters IX-XIII into two sets (repeating the sub-chapter headings, creating sub-chapters XIV-XVIII each according to the following (I use 'X. Earnestness' because I do not understand how 'IX. Ganga Repetition' could be divided up and make sense*:

X. Earnestness

Tathagata

i. Seclusion

XV. Earnestness

Tathagata

ii. Ending in Restraint of Passion

... etc. ...

which would create a different scheme for them than is found in SN 5.45 and not include the sub-sub heads 'Ending in the Deathless' and 'Ending in Nibbana'.

*All versions are abridged so there is no clue. I speculate that the version as found in SN 5.45 was the first and that it was elaborated on to create the subsequent chapters. If this was the case then my X in this chapter could have been expanded to include the four sub-sub-sections. In any event the confusion here should certainly be considered a place to look for clues as to the original organization.

 

Ganga-Peyyalo: Viveka

Covering suttas 77-88. The Buddha likens the flow of great rivers to the way in which developing and making much of the Seven Dimensions of Self-Awakening brings one to Nibbana.

PTS: Ganga-Repetition, V.114

 

[77] Pathama Pacina Suttam, V.134

PTS: Eastward a, V.114
WP: Slanting to the East, II.1622

[78] Dutiya Pacina Suttam, V.134

PTS: Eastward b.1, V.114
WP: 78-96: Slanting to the East, II.1622

[79] Tatiya Pacina Suttam, V.134

PTS: Eastward b.2, V.114

[80] Catuttha Pacina Suttam, V.134

PTS: Eastward b.3, V.114

[81] Pancama Pacina Suttam, V.134

PTS: Eastward b.4, V.114

[82] Chattha Pacina Suttam, V.134

PTS: Eastward c, V.114

[83] Pathama Samudda Suttam, V.134

PTS: Ocean (a), V.114
WP: 92-96: The Ocean 83-102, II.1622

[84] Dutiya Samudda Suttam, V.134

PTS: Ocean (b.1), V.114

[85] Tatiya Samudda Suttam, V.134

PTS: Ocean (b.2), V.114

[86] Catuttha Samudda Suttam, V.134

PTS: Ocean (b.3), V.114

[87] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.134

PTS: Ocean (b.4), V.114

[88] Pancama Samudda Suttam, V.134

PTS: Ocean (c), V.114

Appamada Vagga: Viveka

Covering suttas 89-98. Nine similes for the caution that is the fundamental condition that leads to the bringing to life of the Seven Dimensions of Self-Awakening.

PTS: Earnestness, V.115
WP: Diligence, II. 1622

 

[89] Tathagata Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Tathagata, V.115
WP: The Tathagata, II.1622

[90] Pada Suttam, V. 135

PTS: The foot, V.115
WP: The Footprint, II.1622

[91] Kuta Suttam, V. 135

PTS: The roof-peak, V.115
WP: The Roof Peak, II.1622

[92] Mula Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Wood, V.115
WP: Roots, II.1622

[93] Saro Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Heart Wood, V.115
WP: Heartwood, II.1622

[94] Vassika Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Jasmine, V.115
WP: Jasmine, II.1622

[95] Raja Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Prince, V.115
WP: Monarch, II.1622

[96] Canda Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Moon, V.115
WP: The Moon, II.1622

[97] Suriya Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Sun, V.115
WP: The Sun, II.1622

[98] Vattha Suttam, V. 135

PTS: Cloth, V.115
WP: The Cloth, II.1622

Balakaraniya Vagga:

Covering suttas 99-110. The Buddha provides twelve similes illustrating various aspects of the Dhamma.

PTS: Deeds Requiring Strength, V.115

 

[99] Bala Suttam, V.135

PTS: Strength, V.115
WP: Strenuous, II.1623

[100] Bija Suttam, V.135

PTS: Seed, V.115
WP: Seeds, II.1623

[101] Naga Suttam, V.135

PTS: The Snake, V.115
WP: Nagas, II.1623

[102] Rukkha Suttam, V.135

PTS: The Tree, V.115
WP: The Tree, II.1623

[103] Kumbha Suttam, V.135

PTS: The Pot, V.115
WP: The Pot, II.1623

[104] Sukiya Suttam, V.135

PTS: Bearded Wheat, V.115
WP: The Spike, II.1623

[105] Akasa Suttam, V.135

PTS: The Sky, V.115
WP: The Sky, II.1623

[106] Pathama Megha Suttam, V.135

PTS: The Rain-cloud a, V.115
WP: The Rain Cloud, II.1623

[107] Dutiya Megha Suttam, V.135

PTS: The Rain-cloud b, V.115
WP: The Rain Cloud 2, II.1623

[108] Nava Suttam, V.135

PTS: The Ship, V.115
WP: The Ship, II.1623

[109] Agantuka Suttam, V.135

PTS: For All Comers, V.115
WP: The Guest House, II.1623

[110] Nadi Suttam, V.135

PTS: The River, V.115
WP: The River, II.1623

XII. Esana Vagga

Covering suttas 111-120. The buddha explains how the seven dimensions of self-awakening is to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of wishes, delusions, corrupting influences, existence, pain, closed-mindedness, flare-ups, sense-experience, and thirst.

PTS: Longings, V.115

 

[111] Esana Suttam, V.136

PTS: Longing, V.115
WP: Searches, II.1623

[112] Vidha Suttam, V.136

PTS: Conceits, V.115
WP: Discriminations, II.1623

[113] Asava Suttam, V.136

PTS: Asava, V.115
WP: Taints, II.1623

[114] Bhava Suttam, V.136

PTS: Becoming, V.115
WP: Existence, II.1623

[115] Dukkhata Suttam, V.136

PTS: Suffering, V.115
WP: Suffering, II.1623

[116] Khila Suttam, V.136

PTS: Obstructions, V.115
WP: Barrenness, II.1623

[117] Mala Suttam, V.136

PTS: Stain, V.115
WP: Stains, II.1623

[118] Nigha Suttam, V.136

PTS: Pains, V.115
WP: Troubles, II.1623

[119] Vedana Suttam, V.136

PTS: Feelings, V.115
WP: Feelings, II.1623

[120] Tanha Suttam, V.136

PTS: Craving, V.115
WP: Cravings, II.1623

120.2 Tasina or Tanha Suttam, V.136

PTS: Thirst, V.115
WP: Thirst, II.1623

Ogha Vagga: Viveka

Covering suttas 121=130. The buddha explains how the seven dimensions of self-awakening are to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of the floods, the bonds, yokes to rebirth, ties to the body, risidual inclinations, sense pleasures, diversions, the fuel stockpiles, the yokes to lower rebirths, the yokes to higher rebirths.

PTS: The Flood, V.116

 

[121] Ogha Suttam, V.136

PTS: The Flood, V.116
WP: Floods, II.1623

[122] Yoga Suttam, V.136

PTS: Bond, V.116
WP: Bonds, II.1623

[123] Upadanam Suttam, V.136

PTS: Grasping, V.116
WP: Clinging, II.1623

[124] Gantha Suttam, V.136

PTS: (Bodily) Ties, V.116
WP: Knots, II.1623

[125] Anusaya Suttam, V.136

PTS: Tendency, V.116
WP: Underlying Tendencies, II.1623

[126] Kamaguna Suttam, V.136

PTS: The Sense-Pleasures, V.116
WP: Cords of Sensual Pleasure, II.1623

[127] Nivaranani Suttam, V.136

PTS: Hindrances, V.116
WP: Hindrances, II.1623

[128] Khanda Suttam, V.136

PTS: Factors, V.116
WP: Aggregates Subject to Clinging, II.1623

[129] Orambhagiya Suttam, V.136

PTS: The Lower Set (of Fetters), V.116
WP: Lower Fetters, II.1623

[130] Uddhambhagiya Suttam, V.136

PTS: The Higher Set (of Fetters), V.116
WP: Higher Fetters, II.1623

 

The below represents the listing in the PTS Pali, Woodward translation and Bhk. Bodhi translation. The content is incorporated above. See 'Note' above.

Ganga-Peyyalo: Raga-vinaya

PTS: Ganga--Repetition: Restraint of Lust, V.116

 

[131-142] (As above but ending in restraint of lust), V.137

PTS: Restraint of lust, V.116
WP: The River Ganges, Etc., II.1624

Appamada Vagga: Raga-vinaya

PTS: Earnestness--Restraint of Lust, V.117

[143-152] (As above but ending in restraint of lust), V.138

PTS: Restraint of lust, V.117
WP: The Tathagata, Etc., II.1625

Balakaraniya Vagga: Raga-vinaya)

PTS: Deeds Requiring Strength: Restraint of Lust, V.117

[153-164] (As above but ending in restraint of lust), V.138

PTS: Restraint of lust, V.117
WP: Strenuous, Etc., II.1625

Esana Vagga: Raga-vinaya

PTS: Longings: Restraint of Lust, V.117

[165-174] (As above but ending in restraint of lust), V.139

PTS: Restraint of lust, V.117
WP: Searches, Etc, II.1625

Ogha Vagga: Raga-vinaya

PTS: The Flood: Restraint of Lust, V.117

[175-184] (As above but ending in restraint of lust), V.139

PTS: Restraint of lust, The higher sort (of fetters), V.
WP: Floods, II.1626


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Maggasamyutta]  [Bojjhangasamyutta]  [Satipatthanasamyutta]  [Indriyasamyutta]  [Sammappadhanasamyutta]  [Balasamyutta]  [Iddhipadasamyutta]  [Anuruddhasamyutta]  [Jhanasamyutta]  [Anapanasamyutta]  [Sotapattisamyutta]  [Saccasamyutta]

 


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