Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikaya
X. Dasaka-Nipata
I. Anisamsa Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
X. The Book of the Tens
I. Profit

Sutta 9

Santa-Vimokkha Suttam

The Blissful

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[11] [9]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Savatthi.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, a monk may be a believer
but yet not be virtuous.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be both a believer
and virtuous?"

But, monks, when a monk is both a believer
and virtuous,
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be both a believer
and virtuous
yet not learned.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be both a believer
and virtuous
and learned?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
yet no dhamma-preacher.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be a believer
and virtuous
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher
yet not a frequenter of debates.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be a believer
and virtuous
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher
and a frequenter of debates,
yet not be confident in expounding dhamma in a company.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be a believer
and virtuous
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and is confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
yet not be expert in discipline.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be a believer
and virtuous
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and be expert in discipline?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and is confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and is expert in discipline,
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and be expert in discipline,
yet be no forest-dweller,
a lodger in solitude.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be a believer
and virtuous
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and be expert in discipline,
and be a forest-dweller,
a lodger in solitude?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and is confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and is expert in discipline,
and is a forest-dweller,
a lodger in solitude,
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and be expert in discipline,
and be a forest-dweller,
a lodger in solitude,
yet not be one who abides experiencing with body
those blissful deliverances[1] in the formless,
experienced by him
who passes beyond objective forms.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be a believer
and virtuous
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and be expert in discipline,
and be a forest-dweller,
and be a lodger in solitude
and be one who abides experiencing with body
those blissful deliverances in the formless,
experienced by him
who passes beyond objective forms?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and is confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and is expert in discipline,
and is a forest-dweller,
a lodger in solitude,
and is one who abides experiencing with body
those blissful deliverances in the formless,
experienced by him
who passes beyond objective forms
he is complete in that respect.

 


 

Monks, a monk may be a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and be expert in discipline,
and be a forest-dweller,
a lodger in solitude,
and is one who abides experiencing with body
those blissful deliverances in the formless,
experienced by him
who passes beyond objective forms,
yet he does not, by destroying the cankers,
in this same visible state comprehending it of himself,
realize the heart's release,
the release by insight,
and attaining it abide therein.

Thus in that respect he is incomplete.

That defect must be remedied by the thought:

"How can I be a believer
and virtuous
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and be confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and be expert in discipline,
and be a forest-dweller,
and be a lodger in solitude
and is one who abides experiencing with body
those blissful deliverances in the formless,
experienced by him
who passes beyond objective forms,
and by destroying the cankers,
in this same visible state comprehending it of myself,
realize the heart's release,
the release by insight,
and attaining it abide therein?"

But, monks, when a monk is a believer
and virtuous,
and learned,
and a dhamma-preacher,
and a frequenter of debates,
and is confident in expounding dhamma in a company,
and is expert in discipline,
and is a forest-dweller,
a lodger in solitude,
and is one who abides experiencing with body
those blissful deliverances in the formless,
experienced by him
who passes beyond objective forms,
and by destroying the cankers,
in this same visible state comprehending it of himself,
realizes the heart's release,
the release by insight,
and attaining it abides therein,
he is complete in that respect.

Monks, if he be endowed with these ten qualities a monk is altogether charming and complete in every attribute.'

 


[1] Cf. A. ii, 183. 'The eightfold deliverance is to be experienced with body.' These eight are given at A. iv, 306, etc.; D. ii, III; Numbers 1-7 are discussed at Buddh. Psych. Eth., I 246 ff.; Expositor i, 255.


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