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Samyutta Nikaya
III. Khandha Vagga
22: Khandha Samyutta
5. Attadipa Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
III: The Book Called The Khandha-Vagga
Containing Kindred Saings
on the Elements of Sensory Existence
and Other Subjects
XXII: Kindred Sayings on Elements (Khandha)
5: On Being an Island to Self

Sutta 49

Pathama Sona Suttam

Sona (1)[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[48] [42]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:-

Once the Exalted One was staying near Rajagaha
in the Bamboo Grove
at the Squirrels' Feeding-Ground.

Then Sona,
the housefather's son,
came to the Exalted One
and sat down.

As he thus sat,
the Exalted One thus addressed Sona,
the housefather's son:

"Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold views about the impermanent body,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but non-seers
of what really is?[2]

[43] Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold views about impermanent feeling,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but non-seers
of what really is?

Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold views about impermanent perception,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but non-seers
of what really is?

Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold views about impermanent activities,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but non-seers
of what really is?

Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold views about impermanent consciousness,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but non-seers
of what really is?

 


 

But, Sona,
whatsoever recluses and brahmins
hold not views about the impermanent body,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but seers
of what really is?

Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold not views about impermanent feeling,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but seers
of what really is?

Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold not views about impermanent perception,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but seers
of what really is?

Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold not views about impermanent activities,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but seers
of what really is?

Whatsoever recluses and brahmins, Sona,
hold not views about impermanent consciousness,
the sorrow-fraught,
the unstable,
such as 'better am I,'
'equal am I,' or
'worse am I' (than thou),
what else are they but seers
of what really is?

 


 

Now what think you, Sona?

Is body permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"And what is impermanent,
is that woe or weal?"

"Woe, lord."

"And is it fitting to hold such views as
'this is mine,'
'this am I,' or
'this is the self of me,'
about that which is impermanent
and unstable?

"Surely not, lord."

Is feeling permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"And what is impermanent,
is that woe or weal?"

"Woe, lord."

"And is it fitting to hold such views as
'this is mine,'
'this am I,' or
'this is the self of me,'
about that which is impermanent
and unstable?

"Surely not, lord."

Is perception permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"And what is impermanent,
is that woe or weal?"

"Woe, lord."

"And is it fitting to hold such views as
'this is mine,'
'this am I,' or
'this is the self of me,'
about that which is impermanent
and unstable?

"Surely not, lord."

Are activities permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"And what is impermanent,
is that woe or weal?"

"Woe, lord."

"And is it fitting to hold such views as
'this is mine,'
'this am I,' or
'this is the self of me,'
about that which is impermanent
and unstable?

"Surely not, lord."

Is consciousness permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"And what is impermanent,
is that woe or weal?"

"Woe, lord."

"And is it fitting to hold such views as
'this is mine,'
'this am I,' or
'this is the self of me,'
about that which is impermanent
and unstable?

"Surely not, lord."

 


 

"Wherefore, Sona,
whatsoever body there be,
whether past,
future or
present,
inward or outward,
gross or subtle,
low or lofty,
far or near -
every body should thus be regarded
as it really is
by right insight
thus:
'this is not mine,'
'this am not I,'
'this of me is not the self.'

Whatsoever feeling there be,
whether past,
future or
present,
inward or outward,
gross or subtle,
low or lofty,
far or near -
every feeling should thus be regarded
as it really is
by right insight
thus:
'this is not mine,'
'this am not I,'
'this of me is not the self.'

Whatsoever perception there be,
whether past,
future or
present,
inward or outward,
gross or subtle,
low or lofty,
far or near -
every perception should thus be regarded
as it really is
by right insight
thus:
'this is not mine,'
'this am not I,'
'this of me is not the self.'

Whatsoever activities there be,
whether past,
future or
present,
inward or outward,
gross or subtle,
low or lofty,
far or near -
all activities should thus be regarded
as it really is
by right insight
thus:
'this is not mine,'
'this am not I,'
'this of me is not the self.'

Whatsoever consciousness there be,
whether past,
future or
present,
inward or outward,
gross or subtle,
low or lofty,
far or near -
every consciousness should thus be regarded
as it really is
by right insight
thus:
'this is not mine,'
'this am not I,'
'this of me is not the self.'

Thus seeing, Sona,
the well-taught Ariyan disciple
feels disgust at body,
feels disgust at feeling,
feels disgust at perception,
feels disgust at the activities
feels disgust at consciousness.

Feeling disgust,
he is repelled thereby.

Being repelled he is released.

In being released,
there is knowledge thereof,
so that he knows:

'Destroyed is rebirth,
lived is the righteous life,
done is my task,
for life in these conditions
there is no hereafter.'"

 


[1] Sona (to be distinguished from Sona). This may have been one of the three bhikkhus of the name mentioned in Theragatha: one of whom gives a name to a section in Uddana.

[2] The three forms of mano (conceit). See Dialog. iii, 209 n.; also S. i. 12; K.S. i, 17. I quote the verse:

'Whoso doth build fancies concerning values: -
"Equal am I, better, or worse (than thou art)" -
Hereby he may quarrels provoke. But whoso
In all three ways holdeth his mind unshaken,
"Equal (am I), or "different" oocurs not.'

Cf. S. ii, 253.


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