Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as ASCII (aiumnntdnl). Alternatives:
[ IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Samyutta Nikaya
IV. Salayatana Vagga
35: Salayatana Samyutta
Pannasaka Dutiya
5. Sala Vagga

The Book of the
Kindred Sayings
35: Kindred Sayings the Sixfold Sphere of Sense The 'Second Fifty' Suttas
5. The Chapter of the Six

Sutta 103

Uddaka Suttam

Uddaka

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[83] [49]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

The Exalted One once staying near Savatthi.

Then the Exalted One addressed the brethren, saying:

"Brethren."

"Lord," responded those brethren to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One thus spake:

"It was Uddaka,[1] Brethren,
the son of Rama,
who spoke these words:

Lo! Versed in lore,[2] all-conqueror am I!
'Tis I that have dug out the root of ill,[3]
Not rpoted out before.

As to that, Brethren,
Uddaka, son of Rama,
though unversed in lore,
exclaims:

'Versed in lore am I.'

Though he was no conqueror of all,
he exclaims:

'All-conqueror am I.'

[50] Though the root of ill was not uprooted,
yet he exclaims:

'I have dug out the root of ill,
not rooted out before.'

Now herein, Brethren, a brother would be right in saying:

Lo! Versed in lore, all-conqueror am I!
'Tis I that have dug out the root of ill,
Not rpoted out before.

And how, Brethren, is a brother
versed in lore?

In so far as he understands,
as they really are,
the arising,
the destruction,
the satisfaction,
the misery,
the way of escape
from the sixfold sphere of sense, -
that is how a brother is versed in lore.

And how, Brethren, is a brother
all-conqueror?

In so far as he sees,
as they really are,
the arising,
the destruction,
the satisfaction,
the misery,
the way of escape
from the sixfold sphere of sense, -
he is freed without grasping, -
that is how a brother is all-conqueror.

And how, Brethren, is a brother
one who has dug out the root of ill,
that imposthume not rooted out before?

'Imposthume,' Brethren,
is a term for this body,
of the four elements compounded,[4]
of parents sprung,
on rice and gruel fed,
impermanent,
of a nature to be worn away,
pounded away,[5]
broken
and scattered.

'Root of the imposthume,' Brethren,
is a term for craving.

When a brother has rooted out craving,
cut it down at the root,
made it like a palm-tree stump,
made it something that has ceased to be,
so that it cannot grow up again in future time, -
that, Brethren, is how a brother
has rooted up the root of the imposthume,
never rooted out before.

It was Uddaka, Rama's son, Brethren, who said:

Lo! Versed in lore, all-conqueror am I!
'Tis I that have dug out the root of ill,
Not rpoted out before.

But a brother (who has dug out the root of -craving) might well indeed exclaim:

Lo! Versed in lore, all-conqueror am I!
'Tis I that have dug out the root of ill,
Not rpoted out before.

 


[1] Cf. M. i, 165. He was the teacher whom Gotama followed on his way to enlightenment. Dissatisfied with his doctrine, he left him as he had left Alara.

"Oyez" = "Hoya! Hoya! Hoya!" or "Hoyeah" or "Hoyez" "Hear ye! Hear ye! Hear ye!" "Now hear this!".

p.p. explains it all - p.p.

[2] Jatu vedagu. Jatu is a doubtful word, used as an adverb. Sanskrit dictionaries derive it from jantu (man), and it generally means 'ever,' 'surely.' Possibly it is for janatu ('take notice '), as I translate here. Cf. K.S. i, 178 n. Comy. has ekansena vedagu, veda-sankhatena nanena neyyesu gato, pandit' asmi.
Idan: See here! Ecce! Idan jatu, the Oyez of the town-crier.

[3] Ganda-mulan = dukkha-mulan. Comy. Cf. Dhp. 60, tanhaya mulan khanatha. Ganda means 'root' or 'stalk' as well as 'boil,' in which sense the Buddha interprets. Text reads palikhitan, but Comy. has apalikhitan, expl. as apalikhatan. We mast read palikhatan, as in the repetition below, for the sake of the metre, but the Buddha's quotation seems to favour apalihhatan in the gatha, and I have translated accordingly.

[4] Cf. Dialog, i, 87 and n.; infra. xli, 5; S. v, 369.

[5] Comy. describes the shampooing (sambahana) of the body from childhood onwards, which wears it gradually away (tanu-vilepana).


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement