Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as ASCII (aiumnntdnl). Alternatives:
[ IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Samyutta Nikaya
IV. Salayatana Vagga
35: Salayatana Samyutta
Pannasaka Tatiya
2. Lokakamaguna Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
IV. Kindred Sayings on the 'Six-Fold Sphere' of Sense and Other Subjects
35: Kindred Sayings the Sixfold Sphere of Sense The 'Third Fifty' Suttas
2. The Chapter on the Worldly Sensual Elements

Sutta 120

Sariputta-Saddhi-Viharika Suttam

Sariputta

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[103] [63]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the venerable Sariputta was once staying near Savatthi,
at Jeta Grove, in Anathapindika's, Park.

Then a certain brother came to visit the venerable Sariputta.

After the exchange of greetings and friendly courtesies
he sat down at one side.

So seated
that brother thus addressed the venerable Sariputta: -

"Friend Sariputta, my fellow-lodger
has renounced the training
and gone back to the lower life."[1]

"So it happens, friend,
with one the door of whose faculties is unguarded,[2]
who is immoderate in eating,
and not given to watchfulness.

That brother, friend,
is of such a nature.

There is apparent confusion here as to how this should be read. It can be heard as 'This particular bhikkhu, so long as he lives will find it impossible...' or 'So living, a bhikkhu, will find it impossible ...' The former would be a more forceful lesson to the bhikkhu being addressed; the latter a more accessible lesson for later hearers.

p.p. explains it all - p.p.

So long as he lives
it will be impossible for him to apply himself[3]
to the righteous life
in all its fulness,
in all its purity.

Indeed, friend, a brother,[4]
the door of whose faculties is guarded,
who is moderate in eating
and given to watchfulness, -
for such an one,
so long as he lives,
it is possible to apply himself
to the righteous life
in all its fulness,
in all its purity.

 


 

And how, friend, has one
the door of his faculties guarded?

Herein a brother, seeing an object with the eye,
is not misled by its outer view,[5]
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil,
unprofitable states,
might overwhelm one who dwells
with the faculty of eye uncontrolled,
he applies himself to such control,
sets a guard over the faculty of eye,
attains control thereof.

When he hears a sound with the ear,
is not misled by its outer view,
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil,
unprofitable states,
might overwhelm one who dwells
with the faculty of ear uncontrolled,
he applies himself to such control,
sets a guard over the faculty of ear,
attains control thereof.

When he smells a scent with the nose,
is not misled by its outer view,
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil,
unprofitable states,
might overwhelm one who dwells
with the faculty of nose uncontrolled,
he applies himself to such control,
sets a guard over the faculty of nose,
attains control thereof.

When he tastes a savour with the tongue,
is not misled by its outer view,
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil,
unprofitable states,
might overwhelm one who dwells
with the faculty of tongue uncontrolled,
he applies himself to such control,
sets a guard over the faculty of tongue,
attains control thereof.

When he contacts tangibles with the body,
is not misled by its outer view,
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil,
unprofitable states,
might overwhelm one who dwells
with the faculty of body uncontrolled,
he applies himself to such control,
sets a guard over the faculty of body,
attains control thereof.

When he cognizes mental states with the mind,
is not misled by its outer view,
nor by its lesser details.

[64] Since coveting and dejection,
evil,
unprofitable states,
might overwhelm one who dwells
with the faculty of mind uncontrolled,
he applies himself to such control,
sets a guard over the faculty of mind,
attains control thereof.

 


 

And how, friend, is one moderate in eating?

Herein, friend, a brother takes his food thoughtfully[6] and prudently,
not for sport,[7]
not for indulgence,
not for personal charm or adornment,
but just enough for the support
and upkeep of the body,
to allay its pains,[8]
to help the practice of the righteous life,
with the thought:

'My former feeling I check,
and set going no new feeling.

So shall I keep going,[9]
be blameless,
and live at ease.

Thus, friend, is one moderate in eating.

 


 

And how, friend, is one given to watchfulness?

Herein, friend, by day
a brother walks up and down
and then sits,
and thus cleanses his heart
from states that may hinder.

By night, for the first watch
a brother walks up and down
and then sits,
and thus cleanses his heart
from states that may hinder.

In the middle watch of the night,
lying on his right side
he takes up the lion-posture,[10]
resting one foot on the other,
and thus collected and composed
fixes his thought on rising up again.

In the last watch of the night,
at early dawn,
he walks up and down,
and then sits,
and so cleanses his heart
from states that may hinder.

Thus, friend, is one given to watchfulness.

Wherefore, friend, thus should you train yourselves:

'We will be watchful over our faculties,
moderate in eating
and given to watchfulness.'

Thus, friend, must you train yourself."

 


[1] Cf. K.S. ii, 38.

[2] Cf. Buddh. Psych. Ethics, pp. 350 ff. and nn.; Dialog. i, 80; Vis. Magg., 16 and refs. (Comy. does not comment here, having done so elsewhere). For the passage following see I 198 (2).

[3] Santanessati = ghatessati. Comy.

[4] Text has so, which would refer to this particular brother. I read yo with MSS. S. 1-3.

[5] Nimitta-gahin.

[6] Cf. K.S. ii, 68; Expositor, 511.

[7] Not for athletic prowess.

[8] Vihinsa-uparatiya. Cf. Asl. 403.

[9] Yatra me bhavissati.

[10] Siha-seyyan. Cf. A. ii, 244 (trans. in Numerical Sayings by A. D. Jayasundere), where the four postures are given, here quoted by Comy.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement