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Samyutta Nikaya
IV. Salayatana Vagga
35: Salayatana Samyutta
Pannasaka Tatiya
2. Lokakamaguna Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
IV. Kindred Sayings on the 'Six-Fold Sphere' of Sense and Other Subjects
35: Kindred Sayings the Sixfold Sphere of Sense The 'Third Fifty' Suttas
2. The Chapter on the Worldly Sensual Elements

Sutta 121

Rahul'ovada Suttam

Rahula[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[105] [64]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was once staying near Savatthi,
at Jeta Grove, in Anathapindika's, Park.

Then as the Exalted One was meditating in solitude this [65] thought occurred to him:

"Ripe now in Rahula
are those states
that bring release to perfection.[2]

Suppose now I give Rahula
the last teachings
for the destruction of the asavas.

So the Exalted One,
robing himself at early dawn,
and taking bowl and robe
set out for Savatthi on his begging-round,
and after completing his round
and eating his meal,
said to the venerable Rahula: -

"Rahula, take a mat.

Let us go to Dark Wood[3] for the noonday rest."

"Very good, lord,"
replied the venerable Rahula to the Exalted One,
and taking a mat
followed behind
in the footsteps of the Exalted One.

Now at that time
countless thousands of devas
were following the Exalted One, thinking:

"To-day the Exalted One will give the venerable Rahula
the last teachings
for the destruction of the asavas..

So the Exalted One plunged into the depths of Dark Wood
and sat down at the foot of a certain tree
on the seat prepared for him.

And the venerable Rahula,
saluting the Exalted One,
sat down also at one side.

As he thus sat
the Exalted One said to the venerable Rahula: -

"Now what think you, Rahula?

Is the eye permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Are objects
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is eye-consciousness
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is eye-contact
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

That experience of feeling,
perception,
the activities
and consciousness,
which arises owing to eye-contact, -
is that permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

 

§

 

Now what think ye, Rahula?

Is the ear permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Are sounds
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is ear-consciousness
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is ear-contact
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

That experience of feeling,
perception,
the activities
and consciousness,
which arises owing to ear-contact, -
is that permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

 

§

 

Now what think ye, Rahula?

Is the nose permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Are scents
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is nose-consciousness
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is nose-contact
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

That experience of feeling,
perception,
the activities
and consciousness,
which arises owing to nose-contact, -
is that permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

 

§

 

Now what think ye, Rahula?

Is the tongue permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Are savours
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is tongue-consciousness
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is tongue-contact
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

That experience of feeling,
perception,
the activities
and consciousness,
which arises owing to tongue-contact, -
is that permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

 

§

 

Now what think ye, Rahula?

Is the body permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Are things tactile
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is body-consciousness
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is body-contact
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

That experience of feeling,
perception,
the activities
and consciousness,
which arises owing to body-contact, -
is that permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

 

§

 

Now what think ye, Rahula?

Is the mind permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Are mind-states
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is mind-consciousness
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

Is mind-contact
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

That experience of feeling,
perception,
the activities
and consciousness,
which arises owing to mind-contact, -
is that permanent
or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, lord."

"What is impermanent,
is that weal or woe?"

"Woe, lord."

"Now what is impermanent,
woeful,
by nature changeable, -
is it fitting to regard that as:

'This is mine.

This am I.

This is my self?'"

"Surely not, lord."

 


 

So seeing, Rahula, the well-taught Triyan disciple
is repelled by the eye,
is repelled by objects,
is repelled by eye-consciousness,
is repelled by eye-contact,
is repelled by that weal or woe or neutral state experienced,
which arises owing to eye-contact.

So seeing, Rahula, the well-taught Triyan disciple
is repelled by the ear,
is repelled by sounds,
is repelled by ear-consciousness,
is repelled by ear-contact,
is repelled by that weal or woe or neutral state experienced,
which arises owing to ear-contact.

So seeing, Rahula, the well-taught Triyan disciple
is repelled by the nose,
is repelled by scents,
is repelled by nose-consciousness,
is repelled by nose-contact,
is repelled by that weal or woe or neutral state experienced,
which arises owing to nose-contact.

So seeing, Rahula, the well-taught Triyan disciple
is repelled by the tongue,
is repelled by savours,
is repelled by tongue-consciousness,
is repelled by tongue-contact,
is repelled by that weal or woe or neutral state experienced,
which arises owing to tongue-contact.

So seeing, Rahula, the well-taught Triyan disciple
is repelled by the body,
is repelled by things tactile,
is repelled by body-consciousness,
is repelled by body-contact,
is repelled by that weal or woe or neutral state experienced,
which arises owing to body-contact.

So seeing, Rahula, the well-taught Triyan disciple
is repelled by the mind,
is repelled by mind-states,
is repelled by mind-consciousness,
is repelled by mind-contact,
is repelled by that weal or woe or neutral state experienced,
which arises owing to mind-contact.

Being repelled by these,
he lusts not for them.

Not lusting he is set free.

In this freedom
comes insight
that it is a being free.

Thus he realizes:

'Rebirth is destroyed,
lived is the righteous life,
done is the task.

For life in these conditions
there is no hereafter.'"

Thus spake the Exalted One.

And the venerable Rahula was delighted with the words of the Exalted One
and welcomed them.

And when this instruction was given,
the venerable Rahula's heart
was freed from the asavas
without grasping.

And in those countless thousands of devas
arose the pure and spotless eye of the Norm,[4]
so that they knew:

"Whatsoever is of a nature to arise,
all that is of a nature to cease."

 


[1] Cf. K.S. ii, 165; iii, 114, 115.

[2] Vimutti-paripacaniya dhamma, i.e. saddhindriya, etc. (faith, energy, mindfulness, concentration, insight), which lead to Path-concentration. Cf. A. ii, 145. Comy. quotes Patisambhida, ii, 1, in full, and Udana, iv.

[3] Cf. K.S. i, 160 n. About two miles from Savatthi. It is really 'Blind Wood,' owing to its having been the haunt of bandits who blinded their victims! So Comy., ad loc. cit.

[4] Dhamma-cakkhu = 'the four paths and path-fruits.' Comy.


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