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Samyutta Nikaya
IV. Salayatana Vagga
35: Salayatana Samyutta
Pannasaka Dutiya
3. Gilana Vagga

The Connected Discourses of the Buddha
IV. The Book of the Six Sense Bases
35: Connected Discourses on the Six Sense Bases
The Second Fifty
3. Sick

Suttas 74-75

Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

"OBhikkhu Bodhi 2000., The Connected Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2000)
This selection from The Connected Discourses of the Buddha: A Translation of the Samyutta Nikaya by Bhikkhu Bodhi is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.wisdompubs.org/terms-use.

 


[46] [1157]

Sutta 74

Pathama Gilana Suttam

Sick 1

[1][pts][than] At Savatthi.

Then a certain bhikkhu approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to him:

"Venerable sir, in such and such a dwelling there is a certain newly ordained bhikkhu, not well known, who is sick, afflicted, gravely ill.

It would be good, venerable sir, if the Blessed One would approach that bhikkhu out of compassion."

Then, when the Blessed One heard the words "newly ordained" and "sick," and understood that he was not a well-known bhikkhu, he went to him.

That bhikkhu saw the Blessed One coming in the distance and stirred on his bed.

The Blessed One said to him:

"Enough, bhikkhu, do not stir on your bed.

There are these seats ready, I will sit down there."

The Blessed One then sat down on the appointed seat and said to that bhikkhu:

"I hope you are bearing up, bhikkhu, I hope you are getting better.

I hope that your painful feelings are subsiding and not increasing, and that their subsiding, not their increase, is to be discerned."

"Venerable sir, I am not bearing up, I am not getting better.

Strong painful feelings are increasing in me, not subsiding, and their increase, not their subsiding, is to be discerned."

"I hope then, bhikkhu, that you are not troubled by remorse and regret."

"Indeed, venerable sir, I have quite a lot of remorse and regret."

[47] "I hope, bhikkhu, that you have nothing for which to reproach yourself in regard to virtue."

"I have nothing, venerable sir, for which to reproach myself in regard to virtue."

"Then, bhikkhu, if you have nothing for which to reproach yourself in regard to virtue, why are you troubled by remorse and regret?"

"I understand, venerable sir, that it is not for the sake of purification of virtue that the Dhamma has been taught by the Blessed One."

"If, bhikkhu, you understand that the Dhamma has not been taught by me for the sake of purification of virtue, then for what purpose do you understand the Dhamma to have been taught by me?"

"Venerable sir, I understand the Dhamma to have been taught by the Blessed One for the sake of the fading away of lust."

"Good, good, bhikkhu!

It is good that you understand the Dhamma to have been taught by me for the sake of the fading away of lust.

For the Dhamma is taught by me for the sake of the fading away of lust.

"What do you think, bhikkhu, is the eye permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, venerable sir."

"Is the ear ... the mind permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, venerable sir."

"Is what is impermanent suffering or happiness?"

"Suffering, venerable sir."

"Is what is impermanent, suffering, and subject to change fit to be regarded thus:

'This is mine, this I am, this is my self'?"

"No, venerable sir."

"Seeing thus ...

He understands:

'... there is no more for this state of being."

This is what the Blessed One said.

Elated, that bhikkhu delighted in the Blessed One's statement.

And while this discourse was being spoken, there arose in that bhikkhu the dust-free, stainless vision of the Dhamma:

"Whatever is subject to origination is all subject to cessation."

 


 

Sutta 75

Dutiya Gilana Suttam

Sick 2

[1][pts][than] (As above down to:)

[48] "If, bhikkhu you understand that the Dhamma has not been taught by me for the sake of purification of virtue, then for what purpose do you understand the Dhamma to have been taught by me?"

"Venerable sir, I understand the Dhamma to have been taught by the Blessed One for the sake of final Nibbana without clinging."

"Good, good, bhikkhu!

It is good that you understand the Dhamma to have been taught by me for the sake of final Nibbana without clinging.

For the Dhamma is taught by me for the sake of final Nibbana without clinging.

"What do you think, bhikkhu, is the eye permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, venerable sir."

"Is the ear ... the nose ... the tongue ... the body ... the mind ... mind-consciousness ... mind-contact ... whatever feeling arises with mind-contact as condition - whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant - permanent or impermanent?"

"Impermanent, venerable sir."

"Is what is impermanent suffering or happiness?"

"Suffering, venerable sir."

"Is what is impermanent, suffering, and subject to change fit to be regarded thus:

'This is mine, this I am, this is my self'?"

"No, venerable sir."

"Seeing thus ...

He understands:

'... there is no more for this state of being."

This is what the Blessed One said.

Elated, that bhikkhu delighted in the Blessed One's statement.

And while this discourse was being spoken, that bhikkhu's mind was liberated from the taints by nonclinging.

 


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