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Samyutta Nikaya
IV. Salayatana Vagga
35: Salayatana Samyutta
Pannasa Catuttham
3. Samudda Vagga

The Connected Discourses of the Buddha
IV. The Book of the Six Sense Bases
35: Connected Discourses on the Six Sense Bases
The Fourth Fifty
3. The Ocean

Sutta 194 [WP: #235]

Aditta-Pariyaya Suttam

The Exposition on Burning

Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

"OBhikkhu Bodhi 2000., The Connected Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2000)
This selection from The Connected Discourses of the Buddha: A Translation of the Samyutta Nikaya by Bhikkhu Bodhi is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://www.wisdompubs.org/terms-use.

 


[168] [1233]

[1][pts][olds] "Bhikkhus, I will teach you a Dhamma exposition on the theme of burning.

Listen to that. ...

"And what, bhikkhus, is the Dhamma exposition on the theme of burning?

It would be better, bhikkhus, for the eye faculty to be lacerated by a red-hot iron pin burning, blazing, and glowing, than for one to grasp the sign through the features in a form cognizable by the eye.

For if consciousness should stand tied to gratification in the sign or in the features, and if one should die on that occasion, it is possible that one will go to one of two destinations: hell or the animal realm.

Having seen this danger, I speak thus.

"It would be better, bhikkhus, for the ear faculty to be lacerated by a sharp iron stake burning, blazing, and glowing, than for one to grasp the sign through the features in a sound cognizable by the ear.

For if consciousness should stand tied to gratification in the sign or in the features, and if one should die on that occasion, it is possible that one will go to one of two destinations: hell or the animal realm.

Having seen this danger, I speak thus.

[169] "It would be better, bhikkhus, for the nose faculty to be lacerated by a sharp nail cutter burning, blazing, and glowing, than for one to grasp the sign through the features in an odour cognizable by the nose.

For if consciousness should stand tied to gratification in the sign or in the features, and if one should die on that occasion, it is possible that one will go to one of two destinations: hell or the animal realm.

Having seen this danger, I speak thus.

"It would be better, bhikkhus, for the tongue faculty to be lacerated by a sharp razor burning, blazing, and glowing, than for one to grasp the sign through the features in a taste cognizable by the tongue.

For if consciousness should stand tied to gratification in the sign or in the features, and if one should die on that occasion, it is possible that one will go to one of two destinations: hell or the animal realm.

Having seen this danger, I speak thus.

"It would be better, bhikkhus, for the body faculty to be lacerated by a sharp spear burning, blazing, and glowing, than for one to grasp the sign through the features in a tactile object cognizable by the body.

For if consciousness should stand tied to gratification in the sign or in the features, and if one should die on that occasion, it is possible that one will go to one of two destinations: hell or the animal realm.

Having seen this danger, I speak thus.

"It would be better, bhikkhus, to sleep - for sleep, I say, is barren for the living, fruitless for the living, insensibility for the living - than to think such thoughts as would induce one who has come under their control to bring about a schism in the Sangha.

[170] Having seen this danger, I speak thus.

"In regard to this, bhikkhus, the instructed noble disciple reflects thus:

'Leave off lacerating the eye faculty with a red-hot iron pin burning, blazing, and glowing.

Let me attend only to this:

So the eye is impermanent, forms are impermanent, eye-consciousness is impermanent, eye-contact is impermanent, whatever feeling arises with eye-contact as condition - whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant - that too is impermanent.

"'Leave off lacerating the ear faculty with a sharp iron stake burning, blazing, and glowing.

Let me attend only to this:

So the ear is impermanent, sounds are impermanent, ear-consciousness is impermanent, ear-contact is impermanent, whatever feeling arises with ear-contact as condition ... that too is impermanent.

"'Leave off lacerating the nose faculty with a sharp nail cutter burning, blazing, and glowing.

Let me attend only to this:

So the nose is impermanent, odours are impermanent, nose-consciousness is impermanent, nose-contact is impermanent, whatever feeling arises with nose-contact as condition ... that too is impermanent.

"'Leave off lacerating the tongue faculty with a sharp razor burning, blazing, and glowing.

Let me attend only to this:

So the tongue is impermanent, tastes are impermanent, tongue-consciousness is impermanent, tongue-contact is impermanent, whatever feeling arises with tongue-contact as condition ... that too is impermanent.

"'Leave off lacerating the body faculty with a sharp spear burning, blazing, and glowing.

Let me attend only to this: So the body is impermanent, Sangha. [171] tactile objects are impermanent, body-consciousness is impermanent, body-contact is impermanent, whatever feeling arises with body-contact as condition ... that too is impermanent.

"'Leave off sleeping.

Let me attend only to this:

So the mind is impermanent, mental phenomena are impermanent, mind-consciousness is impermanent, mind-contact is impermanent, whatever feeling arises with mind-contact as condition ... that too is impermanent.'

"Seeing thus, bhikkhus, the instructed noble disciple experiences revulsion towards the eye, forms, eye-consciousness, eye-contact, and whatever feeling arises with eye-contact as condition - whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant ... towards the mind, mental phenomena, mind-consciousness, mind-contact, and whatever feeling arises with mind-contact as condition. ...

Experiencing revulsion, he becomes dispassionate.

Through dispassion [his mind] is liberated.

When it is liberated there comes the knowledge:

'It's liberated.'

He understands:

'Destroyed is birth, the holy life has been lived, what had to be done has been done, there is no more for this state of being.'

"This, bhikkhus, is the Dhamma exposition on the theme of burning."

 


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