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The Seven Dimensions of Self-Awakening

Satta Sambojjhangā

The Seven Dimensions of Self-Awakening, The Seven Limbs of Wisdom

References:

The Seventh Lesson
[MN 118]
PTS: Majjhima Nikaya III: #118 (Middle Length Sayings III #118: Mindfulness When Breathing, Horner trans., pp127)
WP: The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha, #118: Mindfulness of Breathing., Nanamoli/Bodhi, trans., pp946
[DN 22]
PTS, Dialogues of the Buddha II: #22: Mahasatipatthana Sutta -- Setting-Up of Mindfulness, Rhys Davids, trans, pp336
[AN 4.14]
PTS: The Book of the Gradual Sayings II: The Book of the Fours, II: Deportment iv: Restraint, Woodward, trans, pp16
Wings to Awakening
Puremind Publishers, Bhante Madawela Punnaji, Awakening Meditation, pp4-7 [SN 46:] Bojjhangasamyutta
[SN 10.102]
[SN 5 54 3] Ethical Culture, Olds, translation
AN 4.236 Woodward, as kamma that is neither dark nor bright, with a result that is neither dark nor bright, kamma that ends kamma
SN 5.46.52 The S. in a 2-fold aspect = 14.

 


 

Pali MO Hare Horner Punnaji Bodhi Nanamoli Rhys Davids (Mrs)Rhys Davids Thanissaro Walshe Woodward
Satta Sambojjhangā The Seven Dimensions of Self-Awakening; Awakening One's Own Wisdom parts in awakening the seven links in awakening Seven Components in the Process of Awakening the seven enlightenment factors the seven enlightenment factors the Seven Factors of Enlightenment The Seven Factors for Awakening The Seven Factors of Enlightonment The Seven Limbs of Wisdom, Factors [SN 4.43.12.xxxi-xxxvii]
Sati Memory, Mind, Mental Satisfaction mindfulness mindfulness Attention mindfulness mindfulness mindfulness mindfulness mindfulness Mindfulness Mindfulness
Dhamma-vicaya Researching things, Investigation of Dhamma Dhamma-testing investigation Observation of experience investigation-of-states; discrimination of states[SN 5.46.2] investigation-of-states search the truth Analysis of Qualities investigation of states investigation of Dhamma, of the Norm [SN 4.43.12.xxxi-xxxvii]
Viriya Energy energy energy Practice energy energy energy energy, effort Persistence energy energy
Pīti Enthusiasm, excitement zest, zest for joy rapture Rapture rapture rapture joy Rapture Rapture delight zest
Passaddhi Impassivity, Poise calming down, Serenity, Satisfaction tranquillity Relaxation tranquillity tranquillity serenity serenity Serenity tranquillity tranquillity, calm [SN 4.43.12.xxxi-xxxvii]
Samādhi Serenity, Getting High concentration concentration Mental repose concentration concentration rapture concentration concentration Concentration concentration
Upekkha Objective Detachment equanimity, poise equanimity introspection equanimity equanimity equanimity Equanimity equanimity equanimity, disinterestedness [SN 4.43.12.xxxi-xxxvii]

 


Walshe, The Long Discourses of the Buddha, PTS, #22: The Greater Discourse on the Foundations of Mindfulness, pp343:

"Again, monks, a monk abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in respect of the seven factors of enlightenment. How does he do so? Here, monks, if the enlightenment-factor of mindfulness is present in himself, a monk knows that it is present. If the enlightenment-factor of mindfulness is absent in himself, he knows that it is absent. And he knows how the unarisen enlightenment-factor of mindfulness comes to arise, and he knows how the complete development of the enlightenment-factor of mindfulness comes about. If the enlightenment-factor of investigation-of-states[1] is present in himself . . . If the enlightenment-factor of energy[2] is present in himself . . . If the enlightenment-factor of delight[3] is present in himself ... If the enlightenment-factor of tranquillity is present in himself ... If the enlightenment factor of concentration is present in himself ... If the enlightenment-factor of equanimity is present in himself, a monk knows that it is present. If the enlightenment-factor of equanimity is absent in himself, he knows that it is absent. And he knows how the unarisen enlightenment-factor of equanimity comes to arise, and he knows how the complete development of the enlightenment-factor of equanimity comes about.'


[1] Dhamma-vicaya: sometimes taken to mean 'investigation of the Doctrine', but the meaning is rather 'investigation of bodily and mental phenomena'. (MO: which amounts to the same thing.)

[2] Viriya: This corresponds to Right Effort in the Noble Eightfold Path.

[3] Piti: a term variously translated ... difficult to translate. Renderings vary from 'interest' through 'zest' to 'rapture'. It is classified not as a feeling (vedana) but as part of the group of mental formations (sankhara), i.e. as a mental reaction. BDic says: 'It may be described psychologically as "joyful interest"' — for which the simplest term would seem to be 'delight'. (Ed — no big deal problem with this, really, but plug "delight" into the search engine here and see what comes up ... a lot of different places where the word "delight" is used, very few of them having anything to do with Piti, many of them discouraging this 'mental reaction'. What we are looking for in this term is a factor in awakening. Delight is 'delight with' something that has happened; Piti is 'enthusiasm for' an aspect of one's practice that is leading to the goal. One should not, simply because of some small apparent progress, take delight in one's accomplishments.)


PTS: The Book of the Gradual Sayings II: The Book of the Fours, II: Deportment iv: Restraint, Woodward, trans, pp16

And of what sort is the effort to make become?

Herein a monk makes to become the limb of wisdom that is mindfulness, that is based on seclusion, on dispassion, on ending, that ends in self-surrender. He makes to become the limb of wisdom that is investigation of Dhamma ... the limb of wisdom that is energy, that is so based. He make to become the limb of wisdom that is zest ... that is tranquillity ... that is concentration ... that is equanimity, based on seclusion, on dispassion, on ending, that ends in self surrender. This, monks, is called "the effort to make become."

 


 

SN 5.46.52
The Seven are Fourteen
Woodward's translation

'And what, monks, is the method of explanation
according to which
the seven limbs of wisdom are fourteen?

Mindfulness, monks, as to one's own personal conditions -
that is the limb of wisdom that is mindfulness.

Mindfulness, monks, as to external conditions, -
that is the limb of wisdom that is mindfulness.

So in speaking of the limb of wisdom which is mindfulness,
that is what is meant.

So by this method it is twofold.

 

 

The limb of wisdom that is Norm-investigation,
in the sense of searching,
investigation,
scrutinizing,
for insight into one's own personal conditions,
that is the limb of wisdom that is Norm-investigation.

The limb of wisdom that is Norm-investigation,
in the sense of searching,
investigation,
scrutinizing,
for insight into externals conditions,
that is the limb of wisdom that is Norm-investigation.

So when we speak of the limb of wisdom that is Norm-investigation,
that is what is meant.

Thus by this method it is twofold.

 

 

Now, monks, that which is bodily energy,
is energy as a limb of wisdom.

That which is mental energy,
that also is energy as a limb of wisdom.

So when we speak of the limb of wisdom which is energy,
that is what is meant.

So by this method it is twofold.

 

 

Now, monks, zest
that is accompanied by thought directed and sustained, -
that is zest as a limb of wisdom.

Zest unaccompanied by thought directed and sustained, -
that also is zest as a limb of wisdom.

So when we speak of the limb of wisdom that is zest,
that is what is meant.

Thus by this method it is twofold.

 

 

Now, monks, tranquillity of body, -
that is a limb of wisdom that is tranquillity.

Tranquillity of mind, -
that also is a limb of wisdom that is tranquillity.

So when we speak of the limb of wisdom that is tranquillity,
that is what is meant.

Thus by this method it is twofold.

 

 

Again, monks, concentration
accompanied by thought directed and sustained, -
that is concentration as a limb of wisdom.

Concentration
unaccompanied by thought directed and sustained, -
that also is a limb of wisdom that is concentration.

Thus when we speak of the limb of wisdom that is concentration,
that is what is meant.

Thus by this method it is twofold.

 

 

Now, monks, equanimity
as to one's own personal conditions, -
that is equanimity as a limb of wisdom.

Equanimity
as to external conditions, -
that also is equanimity as a limb of wisdom.

So when we speak of the limb of wisdom that is equanimity,
that is what is meant.

Thus by this method it is twofold.

So, monks, this is the method of explanation
according to which the seven limbs of wisdom
are fourteen.'

 


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