Indexes Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Index of the Suttas of the
Aŋguttara Nikāya
Chakka-Nipāta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya

PTS: Aŋguttara Nikāya, The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
Volume III Fives and Sixes, ed. by E. Hardy, London: Pali Text Society 1897.

PTS: Aŋguttara Nikāya, The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text
Volume III Fives and Sixes.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT]. Pali vagga titles are links to this version of the Pali. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the WP Bhk. Bodhi and ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Much, but not all the Pali has been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many of the suttas have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Book of the Gradual Sayings Aŋguttara Nikāya or More-Numbered Suttas
ATI: Translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight
WP: The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha, Bhikkhu Bodhi translation
BD: The M. Olds translations

6. Chakka Nipāta) III.279

PTS: The Book of the Sixes
ATI: Book of the Sixes
WP: The Book of the Sixes

I. Āhuneyya Vagga, III.279

PTS: The Worthy, III.202
WP: Worthy of Gifts, 857

#1: Paṭhamā Huneyya Suttaɱ, III.279

A bhikkhu that remains detached when contacted with the objects of sense is worthy of veneration, offerings, and represents a unique opportunity to make good kamma.

PTS: Worthy of Offerings a, III.202
WP: 1. Worth of Gifts (1), 857

#2: Dutiya Huneyya Suttaɱ, III.280

A bhikkhu who experiences magic powers, is clairvoyant, knows the hearts of others, remembers past lives, sees the rebirth of beings according to their deeds and who has destroyed the corrupting influences is worthy of veneration, offerings, and represents a unique opportunity to make good kamma.

PTS: Worthy of Offerings b, III.202
WP: 2. Worth of Gifts (2), 858

#3: Indriya Suttaɱ, III.281

A bhikkhu who develops the forces of faith, energy, memory, serenity, and wisdom and who has destroyed the corrupting influences is worthy of veneration, offerings, and represents a unique opportunity to make good kamma.

PTS: Faculties, III.203
WP: 3. Faculties, 859

#4: Bala Suttaɱ, III.282

A bhikkhu who develops the powers of faith, energy, memory, serenity, and wisdom and who has destroyed the corrupting influences is worthy of veneration, offerings, and represents a unique opportunity to make good kamma.

PTS: Powers, III.203
WP: 4. Powers, 860

#5: Paṭhama Ājānīya Suttaɱ, III.282

The bhikkhu, who, like a king's thoroughbred horse, is able to withstand the assault of objects of sense is worthy of veneration, offerings, and represents a unique opportunity to make good kamma.

PTS: The Thoroughbred a, III.203
WP: 5. Thoroughbred (1), 860

#6: Dutiya Ājānīya Suttaɱ, III.283

The bhikkhu, who, like a king's thoroughbred horse, is able to withstand the assault of objects of sense is worthy of veneration, offerings, and represents a unique opportunity to make good kamma.

PTS: The Thoroughbred b, III.204
WP: 6. Thoroughbred (2), 861

#7: Tatiya Ājānīya Suttaɱ, III.283

The bhikkhu, who, like a king's thoroughbred horse, is able to withstand the assault of objects of sense is worthy of veneration, offerings, and represents a unique opportunity to make good kamma.

PTS 6-7: The Thoroughbred c, III.204
WP: 7. Thoroughbred (3), 861

#8: Anuttariya Suttaɱ, III.284

Six ways of framing the idea of what is above all else.

PTS: Above All, III.204
WP: 8. Unsurpassed Things, 862

#9: Anussatiṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, III.284

Six objects that are bases for the development of expanded recollection.

PTS: Ever Minding, III.204
WP: 9. Subjects of Recollection, 862

#10: Mahānāma Suttaɱ, III.284

Mahanama asks the Buddha about the things that should be made a big thing of by the Streamwinner. He is told to establish recollection of the Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha, his own ethical conduct, his generosity, and to reflect on the fact that it is by these means that the various Gods have become such as they are.

PTS: Mahānāma, III.204
WP: 10. Mahānāma, 862

II. Sārāṇīya Vagga, III.288

PTS: Be Considerate, III.208
WP: Cordiality, 862

#11: Paṭhama Sārāṇīya Suttaɱ, III.288

The Buddha describes six ways in which bhikkhus are considerate of one another.

PTS: On Being Considerate a, III.208
WP: 11. Cordiality (1), 865

#12: Dutiya Sārāṇīya Suttaɱ, III.289

The Buddha describes six ways in which bhikkhus are considerate of one another producing concord.

PTS: On Being Considerate b, III.208
ATI: Conducive to Amiability
WP: 12. Cordiality (2), 866

#13: Nissāraṇīya Suttaɱ, III.290

The Buddha, by six different means, teaches how to achieve freedom of heart, how to recognize the presence or absense of freedom of heart, and how to advise someone who erroneously believes he has achieved freedom of heart.

PTS: Amity, III.209
ATI: Means of Escape
WP: 13. Escape, 867

#14: Bhaddaka Suttaɱ, III.292

Sariputta teaches the way to an unlucky death through taking delight in worldly activities, talk, sleep, company, companionship and useless stuff and the way to a lucky death through taking no delight in worldly activities, talk, sleep, company, companionship and useless stuff.

PTS: The Lucky Fate, III.210
WP: 14. A Good Death, 869

#15: Anutappa Suttaɱ, III.294

Sariputta teaches the way to a fate of burning remorse through taking delight in worldly activities, talk, sleep, company, companionship and useless stuff and the way to a fate free from burning remorse through taking no delight in worldly activities, talk, sleep, company, companionship and useless stuff.

PTS: Without Remorse, III.211
WP: 15. Regret, 870

#16: Nakulapitu Suttaɱ, III.295

The story of how Nakula's Mother cured her husband of a grave illness by releaving him of all his possible worries about her.

PTS: Nakula's Parents, III.211
ATI: Nakula's Parents
WP: 16. Nakula, 871

#17: Kusala Suttaɱ, III.298

The Buddha attempts to inspire some novices to wakefulness by way of numerous examples of the energicic characteristics of great men.

PTS: Right Things, III.214
WP: 17. Wholesome, 873

#18: Macchika Suttaɱ, III.301

The Buddha points out that in his day the various trades of the butcher did not pay off in living in luxory, or possessing wealth and social acceptance and that those engaged in such trades could look forward to rebirth in Hell.

PTS: The Fish, III.216
WP: 18. The Fish Dealer, 875

#19: Paṭhama Maraṇasati Suttaɱ, III.303

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to practice rememberance of death and a number of them come forward with the way they put this instruction into practice. The Buddha praises only those who practice such rememberance in the immediate present.

PTS: Mindfulness of Death a, III.217
ATI: Mindfulness of Death (1)
WP: 19. Mindfulness of Death (1), 876

#20: Dutiya Maraṇasati Suttaɱ, III.306

The Buddha describes in detail the practice of remembering death.

PTS: Mindfulness of Death b, III.219
ATI: Mindfulness of Death (2)
WP: 20. Mindfulness of Death (2), 878

III. Anuttariya Vagga, III.309

PTS: Above all, III.220
WP: The Unsurpassed Things, 880

#21: Sāmagāmaka Suttaɱ, III.309

A deva reveals to Gotama three things that lead to the falling away of a bhikkhu in training. The Buddha relates the insident to the bhikkhus telling them that they should be ashamed that the devas know such things. Then he adds three other things that also lead to the falling away of a bhikkhu in training.

PTS: At Samagama, III.220
WP: 21. Sāmaka, 880

#22: Aparihānīya-Dhamma Suttaɱ, III.310

The Buddha teaches six things that lead to the success of a bhikkhu in training.

PTS: The Unfailing, III.221
WP: 22. Non-Decline, 881

#23: Bhaya Suttaɱ, III.310

Six terms that should be considered synonyms for sense pleasures: 'fear', 'pain', 'disease', 'inflammation', 'bondage', and 'swamp.'

PTS: Fear, III.221
WP: 23. Peril, 881

#24: Himavanta Suttaɱ, III.311

Six components of samadhi.

PTS: Himalaya, III.222
BD: Breaking up Mount Himalaya, Olds, trans.
WP: 24. Himalayas, 882

#25: Anussatiṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, III.312

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to establish recollection of the Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha, one's own ethical conduct, one's generosity, and to reflect on the fact that it is by these means that the various Gods have become such as they are and further it is by these means some attain Nibbana.

PTS: Ever Minding, III.223
WP: 25. Recollection, 883

#26: Mahā Kaccāna Suttaɱ, III.314

Maha Kaccana praises the the Buddha's exposition of the six establishments of further memory: recollection of the Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha, one's own ethical conduct, one's generosity, and to reflect on the fact that it is by these means that the various Gods have become such as they are and further it is by these means some attain Nibbana.

PTS: Kaccāna III.224
WP: 26. Kaccāna, 884

#27: Paṭhama Samaya Suttaɱ, III.317

A bhikkhu asks the Buddha about when it would be appropriate for one to approach someone who has become mind (attained arahantship) and is told of the six occasions when such a visit is called for.

PTS: The Times a, III.224
BD: Visiting A Mind-Become One
WP: 27. Occasion (1), 886

#28: Dutiya Samaya Suttaɱ, III.320

A group of bhikkhus has gathered around to discuss the appropriate time for visiting a bhikkhu who has become mind. Their suggestions all have to do with the convenience of the visit for the mind-become bhikkhu. Maha Kaccana however heard the teaching of the Buddha himself on the subject when a bhikkhu asks the Buddha about the same issue. He then relates the sutta [AN 6.27.] in which the Buddha describes the six occasions when such a visit is called for: at the time a bhikkhu is harassed by lust for sense pleasures, the anger and hate resulting from deviance from the way, sluggishness, anxiety from remorse, uncertainty, and not knowing what indicates what such as to terminate the corrupting influences.

PTS: The Times b, III.226
WP: 28. Occasion (2), 888

#29: Udāyi Suttaɱ, III.322

The Buddha asks Udayi about the five establishments of memory and gets a wrong answer. Then he asks Ananda the same question and gets a satisfactory response.

PTS: Udāyin, III.227
WP: 29. Udāyī, 889

#30: Anuttariya Suttaɱ, III.325

The Buddha delivers a forceful sermon on distinguishing between material and spiritual values with regard to what is seen, what is heard, what is considered gain, what is useful to study, who is profitable to serve, and what is best to keep in mind.

PTS: Above All, III.229
WP: 30. Unsurpassed Things, 892

IV. Devatā Vagga, III.329

PTS: The Devas, III.232
WP: Deities, 892

#31: Sekha Suttaɱ, III.329

Six things that lead to the falling away of a bhikkhu in training, and six things that lead to not falling away.

PTS: In Training, III.232
WP: 31. Trainer, 895

#32: Paṭhama Aparihāna Suttaɱ, III.330

A deva visits the Buddha and tells him of six things that lead to a bhikkhu not falling away.

PTS: They Fail Not a, III.232
WP: 32. Non-Decline (1), 895

#33: Dutiya Aparihāna Suttaɱ, III.331

A deva visits the Buddha and tells him of six things that lead to a bhikkhu not falling away.

PTS: They Fail Not b, III.233
WP: 33. Non-Decline (2), 896

#34: Moggallāna Suttaɱ, III.331

Maha Moggallana in a dialog with a deva asks about which of the gods who have achieved Streamwinning are aware of the fact.

PTS: Maha Moggallana, III.233
WP: 34. Moggallāna, 896

#35: Vijjābhāgiya Suttaɱ, III.334

A paticca-samuppada-like progression leading to vision of a method to bring about Nibbana.

PTS: Parts of Wisdom, III.235
BD: Constituents of Vision, Olds, trans.,
WP: 35. Pertain to True Knowledge, 898

#36: Vivādamūla Suttaɱ, III.334

The Buddha lists and condemns six things that foster contention and urges the bhikkhus to get rid of them wherever they appear.

PTS: The Roots of Contention, III.235
WP: 36. Disputes, 898

#37: Jaḷaŋgadāna Suttaɱ, III.334

The three elements on the part of the giver and the three elements on the part of the receiver that go into the making of a gift of incalculably rich results.

PTS: Alms, III.236
ATI: Giving
WP: 37. Giving, 899

#38: Attakāra Suttaɱ, III.336

The Buddha refutes the idea that there is no self and no other.

PTS: Self-acting, III.237
BD: Self-doer, Olds, trans.
WP: 38. Self-Initiative, 900

#39: Kamma-nidāna Suttaɱ, III.337

Three pairs of ways of piling up deeds: through greed and not greed; hate and not hate; stupidity and wisdom.

PTS: The Means, III.239
WP: 39. Origination, 902

#40: Kimbila Suttaɱ, III.339

Venerable Kimbila asks about the factors involved in the longevity of the Dhamma. Gotama gives him six reasons the True Dhamma will not last long and six reasons it will last long.

PTS: The venerable Kimbila, III.239
WP: 40. Kimbila, 903

#41: Dārukkhandha Suttaɱ, III.340

Sariputta describes how one with magic powers is able to see even a block of wood as earth, or water, or fire, or wind.

PTS: The log of wood, Hare, trans., III.240
ATI: The Wood Pile, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.,
BD: The Tree-trunk, Olds, trans.
WP: 41. A Block of Wood, 904

#42: Nāgita Suttaɱ, III.341

The Buddha explains to Nagita, his attendant, his refusal to accept homage by a series of images progressively pointing out the disadvantages of proximity to society and the advantages of solitude.

PTS: The Venerable Nagita, III.241
ATI: To Nagita, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 42. Nāgita, 905

V. Dhammika Vagga, III.344

PTS: Dhammika, III.243
WP: Dhammika, 907

#43: Nāga Suttaɱ, III.344

The Buddha explains that whereas in the world any great bulky thing is called a Naga, the great Naga is one who commits no unskillful deed of body, speech or mind.

PTS: The Elephant, III.243
WP: 43. The Nāga, 907

#44: Migasālā Suttaɱ, III.347

Migasala confronts Ananda in a huff because of her confusion over the fates of her father and uncle. Both were declared to have been reborn in the Tusita realm as Once-returners by the Buddha. Her father was proficient in ethical conduct but deficient in wisdom, her uncle proficient in wisdom but deficient in ethical behavior, but Migasala only sees one side: that her father was proficient in ethical behavior and her uncle was not; and she proceds to judge the Buddha and the Dhamma as flawed. Gotama explains the issue to Ananda and gives three similar cases.

PTS: Migasala, III.246
WP: 44. Migasālā, 911

#45: Iṇa Suttaɱ, III.351

The Buddha likens to a debt the trouble one gets into when one's behavior is not governed by faith, conscientiousness, energy, and wisdom into in the good nor fear of blame for doing bad.

PTS: The Debt, III.249
ATI: Debt, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 45. Debt, 914

#46: Mahā Cunda Suttaɱ, III.355

Maha Cunda urges the Sutta Memorizers and the Meditation Practitioners to respect each other as both sorts of men are rarely found in the world.

PTS: Mahā Cunda, III.252
Cunda, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 46. Cunda, 917

#47: Paṭhama Sandiṭṭhika Suttaɱ, III.356

Sivaka the wanderer asks Gotama to explain the idea of a Dhamma which is to be seen for one's self.

PTS: For This Life a, III.253
ATI: Visible Here-and-Now, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: To Be Seen for One's Self, Olds, trans.,
WP: 47. Directly Visible (1), 919

#48: Dutiya Sandiṭṭhika Suttaɱ, III.357

A brahman asks Gotama to explain the idea of a Dhamma which is to be seen for one's self.

PTS: For This Life b, III.254
BD: To Be Seen for One's Self 2, Olds, trans.,
WP: 48. Directly Visible (2), 920

#49: Khema Suttaɱ, III.358

Two bhikkhus come to the Buddha to declare Arahantship and the Buddha approves, praising the fact that they speak of the Goal without mentioning the self.

PTS: Khema, III.254
ATI: With Khema, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 49. Khema, 921

#50: Indriya Saŋvara Suttaɱ, III.360

A paticca-samuppada-like sutta showing how lack of restraint of the sense-forces destroys the possibility of knowing and seeing freedom while restraint of the sense-forces results in knowing and seeing freedom.

PTS: The Senses, III.256
WP: 50. Sense Faculties, 922

#51: Ānanda Suttaɱ, III.361

Ananda speaks with Sariputta about hearing new doctrines, retaining and maintaining previously learned and understood doctrines and learning the unknown.

PTS: Ananda, III.256
ATI: Ven. Ananda, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 51. Ānanda, 923

#52: Khattiya Suttaɱ, III.362

When asked by Brahman Janussoni, Gotama explains the intentions, dreams, means, wants, and ultimate goals of the warrior, the brahman, the householder, the woman, the thief, and the Samana.

PTS: The Noble, III.258
WP: 52. Khattiya, 924

#53: Appamāda Suttaɱ, III.364

A brahman asks the Buddha if there is one thing which if properly cultivated can lead to welfare in both this life and the life hereafter. He is told that there is one thing that can do this: appamada, non-carelessness.

PTS: Earnestness, III.259
WP: 53. Heedfulness, 926

#54: Dhammika Suttaɱ, III.366

Dhammika, a short-tempered bhikkhu is making life so uncomfortable for other bhikkhus that they no longer wish to live with him. As a result the lay followers drive him away and goes to visit the Buddha. The Buddha, without chastizing him, leads him by parables to an understanding of the error of his ways.

PTS: Dhammika, III.260
WP: 54. Dhammika, 926

VI. Mahā Vagga, III.374

PTS: The Great Chapter, III.266
WP: The Great Chapter, 932

#55: Soṇa Suttaɱ, III.374

A famous sutta in which the simile of the overstrung and understrung lute is given to illustrate the technique of balancing ones energies in the struggle to attain the goal.

PTS: Sona, Hare, trans., III.266
ATI: About Sona, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 55. Soṇa, 932

#56: Phagguṇa Suttaɱ, III.379

The Buddha describes six situations in which hearing Dhamma before dying can produce either non-returning or arahantship.

PTS: Phagguna, III.270
WP: 56. Phagguṇa, 936

#57: Chaḷābhijāti Suttaɱ, III.383

When Ananda describes what a teacher of another sect calls 'the six classes of life', the Buddha responds with his own list.

PTS: The Six Breeds, III.273
WP: 57. Six Classes, 939

#58: Āsava Suttaɱ, III.387

The Buddha gives a detailed run-down of the sources of corrupting influences [asavas] and how to deal with them.

PTS: The Cankers, III.276
WP: 58. Taints, 942

#59: Dārukammika Suttaɱ, III.391

A layman who has been giving alms only to forest-gone and rag-robe wearing bhikkhus believing that these outer signs of austerity indicated arahantship is shown a better way to judge an alms-worthy bhikkhu.

PTS: The Wood-Seller, III.278
WP: 59. Dārukammika, 944

#60: Hatthisāriputta Suttaɱ, III.392

Citta Hatthisariputta keeps interrupting the discourse of higher Dhamma by two elders and when told not to do so is defended by his friends who call him a wise bhikkhu capable of such a discussion. Maha Kotthita gently explains to them that although this bhikkhu has attained certain very high states of samadhi, he is nevertheless still world-bound and will soon leave the order. This happens and the bhikkhus are impressed and tell the Buddha who then tells them that Citta will soon tire of the worldly life and again join the order. And this too happens and Citta becomes an arahant.

PTS: Citta Hatthisariputta, III.279
WP: 60. Hatthi, 946

#61: Majjhe Suttaɱ, III.399

A number of bhikkhus debate the meaning of the riddle 'Who knows both ends - not midst that sage is soiled, him call I great man, he here hath passed the seamstress' in 'The Way to the Beyond'.

PTS: The Way to the Beyond, Hare, trans., III.284||
BD: The Middle, Olds, trans.
WP: 61. Middle, 950

#62: Purisindriyañāna Suttaɱ, III.402

A bhikkhu asks Ananda if the Buddha's statement that Devadatta was doomed to hell for a kalpa was made as a result of his encompassing Devadatta's mind with his own, or whether it was made as a result of being told this would happen by a deva. Gotama launches into a detailed account of encompassing a mind with the mind.

PTS: The Solemn Utterance, III.286
WP: 62. Knowledge, 953

#63: Nibbedhika Suttaɱ, III.410

The Buddha teaches acuriculum in Dhamma, and in drawing-from-experience; urging the bhikkhus to become expert on desire, on that from which desire springs, on desire's variety, desire's outcome, on desire's eradication, on the way to go to desire's eradication. He similarly treats of sensation, perception, corruption and kamma.

PTS: A penetrative discourse, Hare, trans., III.291
ATI: Penetrative, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Drawing from Experience, Olds, trans.
WP: 63. Penetrative, 958

#64. Sīhanāda Suttaɱ III.417

Six powers of the Buddha by which he claims leadership, has confidence in addressing any group, and rolls on the wheel of Dhamma.

PTS: The Lion-Roar, III.295
WP: 64. Lion's Roar, 965

VII. Devatā Vagga, aka Anāgāmi Vagga, III.421

PTS: The Devas, III.297
WP: Non-Returner, 967

#65: Anāgāmi-Phala Suttaɱ, III.421

Six things which must be givin up in order to experience the fruit of non-returning: lack of faith, shamelessness, having no fear of blame, sloth, forgetfulness, and stupidity.

PTS: The Non-Returner, III.297
WP: 65. Non-Returner, 967

#66: Arahatta Sacchikaroti Suttaɱ, aka Arahatta-phala III.421

Six things which must be givin up in order to experience Arahantship: thick-headedness, sluggishness, agitation, anxiety, faithlessness and carelessness.

PTS: The Arahant, III.297
WP: 66. Arahant, 967

#67: Mitta Suttaɱ, III.422

The Buddha describes how having good or bad friends affects higher behavior, proper training, the perfection of ethical behavior, and the abandoning of lust for sense pleasures, lust for forms and lust for the formless.

PTS: Friends, III.297
WP: 67. Friends, 968

#68: Saŋgaṇikārāma Suttaɱ, III.422

The Buddha describes how finding one's enjoyment in the pleasure of company spoils one's chances of attaining Nibbana and contrasts that with the way taking one's pleasure in the enjoyment of solitude smooths the way to Nibbana.

PTS: Company, III.298
WP: 68. Delight in Company, 968

#69: Devatā Suttaɱ, III.423

A Deva visits the Buddha and describes six things that do not lead to a bhikkhu falling away. Gotama repeats the episode to the bhikkhus. Sariputta elaborates the detailed meaning. Gotama confirms and repeats what Sariputta has said.

PTS: The Deva, III.298
WP: 69. A Deity, 969

#70: Samādhi Suttaɱ, III.425

Without serenity (samadhi) developed to a high degree, it is not possible to obtain the various magic powers, arahantship or the three visions of the Arahant.

PTS: Psychic Power, III.299
WP: 70. Concentration, 970

#71: Sakkhibhabba Suttaɱ, III.426

The Buddha describes the six elements that go into being able to see a thing for one's self.

PTS: The Eyewitness, III.299
WP: 71. Capable of Realizing, 971

#72: Bala Suttaɱ, III.427

Six things which give one ability in Serenity (samadhi).

PTS: Strength, III.300
WP: 72. Strength, 972

#73: Paṭhama Jhāna Suttaɱ, III.428

Six things which are required to enter and abide in the First Jhana.

PTS: Musing, III.300
WP: 73. First Jhāna (1), 972

#74: Dutiya Paṭhama Jhāna Suttaɱ, III.428

Six things which are required to enter and abide in the First Jhana.

PTS: Musing 2, III.300
BD: Second First Jhāna Sutta, Olds, trans.
WP: 74. First Jhāna (2), 972

VIII. Arahatta Vagga, III.429

PTS: Arahantship, III.301
WP: Arahantship, 973

#75: Dukkha Suttaɱ, III.429

Six things which constitute living in Pain, and six which constitute living at ease.

PTS: Ill at Ease, III.301
WP: 75. In Suffering, 973

#76: Arahatta Suttaɱ, III.430

Unless these six things are given up, there is no attaining Arahantship.

PTS: Arahantship, III.301
WP: 76. Arahantship, 973

#77: Uttarī-Manussa-Dhamma Suttaɱ, III.430

Unless one give up these six things one will be unable to realize states beyond those of mankind.

PTS: Beyond, III.302
WP: 77. Superior, 974

#78: Sukhasomanassa Suttaɱ, III.431

Six practices for living happily here and now which also set up the conditions for attaining Arahantship.

PTS: Happiness, III.302
WP: 78. Happiness, 974

#79: Adhigama Suttaɱ, III.431

Six guidlines for getting and keeping things.

PTS: Attainment, III.302
WP: 79. Achievement, 974

#80: Mahantatta Suttaɱ, III.432

Six things that result in great achievement in things.

PTS: Greatness, III.303
WP: 80. Greatness, 975

#81: Paṭhama Niraya Suttaɱ, III.432

Six things that land one in Hell, and six things that land one in heaven.

PTS: Hell (1), III.303
WP: 81. Hell (1), 975

#82: Dutiya Niraya Suttaɱ, III.433

Six things that land one in Hell, and six things that land one in heaven.

PTS: Hell (2), III.303
WP: 82. Hell (2), 976

#83: Aggadhamma Suttaɱ, III.433

Six things that if engaged in prevent and if abstained from enable attainment of Arahantship.

PTS: The Chief Thing, III.303
WP: 83. The Foremost State, 976

#84: Ratatidivasa Suttaɱ, III.434

Six things which predict, as night follows day, decline not advancement; and six things which predict, as night follows day, advancement not decline.

PTS: Day and Night, III.
WP: 84. Nights, 976

IX. Sīti Vagga, III.435

PTS: The Cool, III.304
WP: Coolness, 977

#85: Sītibhāva Suttaɱ, III.435

Six ways of managing things that prevent access to the cool, six which provide access to the cool.

PTS: The Cool, Hare, trans., III.304
ATI: Cooled, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 85. Coolness, 977

#86: Āvaraṇa Suttaɱ, III.435

Six obstructions in the way.

PTS: The Stops, Hare, trans., III.304
ATI: Obstructions, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 86. Obstructions, 977

#87: Voropita Suttaɱ, III.436

Six cases under the heading of 'obstructions in the way resulting from deeds'.

PTS: The Stop of Action, III.305
ATI: Kamma Obstructions, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 87. A Murderer, 978

#88: Sussūsati Suttaɱ, III.437

Six cases under the heading of 'obstructions in the way resulting from lack of a sense of urgency.

PTS: No Desire to Listen, Hare, trans., III.305
ATI: Listening Well, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 88. One Wishes to Listen, 978

#89: Appahāya Suttaɱ, III.438

Six things which must be given up in order to attain high view.

PTS: To Be Given Up, III.305
WP: 89. Without Having Abandoned, 979

#90: Pahīṇa Suttaɱ, III.438

Six things which are given up by one who attains high view.

PTS: They Are Given Up, III.306
WP: 90. Abandoned, 979

#91: Abhabba Suttaɱ, III.438

A person of high view is one who is not of these six things.

PTS: Cannot Be Framed, III.306
WP: 91. Incapable, 980

#92: Abhabbaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, III.438

Six things which are impossible for one who has attained high view.

PTS: The Teacher, III.306
WP: 92. Cases (1), 980

#93: Dutiya Abhabbaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, III.439

Six things which are impossible for one who has attained high view.

PTS: Any Phenomenon, III.306
WP: 93. Cases (2), 980

#94: Tatiya Abhabbaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, III.439

Six things which are impossible for one who has attained high view.

PTS: His Mother, III.306
WP: 94. Cases (3), 980

#95: Catuttha Abhabbaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, III.440

Six things which are impossible for one who has attained high view.

PTS: Self-Wrought, III.307
WP: 95. Cases (4), 981

X. Ānisaɱsa Vagga, III.441

PTS: Advantages, III.307
WP: Benefit, 981

#96: Pātubhāva Suttaɱ, III.441

Six things which are hard to come by in the world.

PTS: The Manifesting, Hare, trans., III.307
WP: 96. Manifestation, 981

#97: Ānisaɱsa Suttaɱ, III.441

Six advantages gained by the Streamwinner.

PTS: Advantages, Hare, trans., III.307
ATI: Rewards, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 97. Benefits, 981

#98: Anicca Suttaɱ, III.441

The Buddha points out how viewing everything own-made as impermanent leads to synchronization with the world and patience and that that results in the behavior and mental attitudes that produce Streamwinning, Once-returning, Non-Returning and Arahantship.

PTS: Impermanence, Hare, trans., III.308
WP: 98. Impermanent, 982

#99 Dukkha Suttaɱ, III.442

The Buddha points out how viewing everything own-made as pain leads to synchronization with the world and patience and that that results in the behavior and mental attitudes that produce Streamwinning, Once-returning, Non-Returning and Arahantship.

PTS: Ill, Hare, trans., III.308
WP: 99. Suffering, 982

#100: Anatta Suttaɱ, III.442

The Buddha points out how viewing all things as not-self leads to synchronization with the world and patience and that that results in the behavior and mental attitudes that produce Streamwinning, Once-returning, Non-Returning and Arahantship.

PTS: Not-self, Hare, trans., III.308
WP: 100. Non-Self, 983

#101: Nibbāna Suttaɱ, III.442

The Buddha points out how viewing happiness in Nibbana leads to synchronization with the world and patience and that that results in the behavior and mental attitudes that produce Streamwinning, Once-returning, Non-Returning and Arahantship.

PTS: Nibbāna, Hare, trans., III.308
WP: 101. Nibbāna, 983

#102: Ānisaɱsa Suttaɱ, III.443

Seeing the advantage of putting into practice six mental resolutions is sufficient to firmly establish certainty that all own-made things are unstable.

PTS: Without Reserve a, Hare, trans., III.308
ATI: Without Exception, Hare, trans.
WP: 102. Unlasting, 983

#103: Ukkhittāsika Suttaɱ, III.443

Seeing the advantage of putting into practice six mental resolutions is sufficient to firmly establish certainty that all own-made things are pain.

PTS: Without Reserve b, Hare, trans., III.309
ATI: Without Exception, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 103. Uplifted Dagger, 984

#104: Atammaya Suttaɱ, III.444

Seeing the advantage of putting into practice six mental resolutions is sufficient to firmly establish certainty that all things are not-self.

PTS: Without Reserve c, Hare, trans., III.309
ATI: Without Exception, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 104. Without Identification, 984

#105: Bhava Suttaɱ, III.444

The three spheres of existence (the sphere of sense-pleasures; the sphere of existence in form, and the sphere of existence without form) must be given up and one must train in higher standards of ethical conduct, higher development of the heart and higher wisdom before one can say one has eliminated thirst and then further one must completely elimiinate pride before one can say one has brought pain to an end.

PTS: Becoming, Hare, trans., III.309
WP: 105. Existence, 984

#106: Taṇhā Suttaɱ, III.445

Three forms of thirst (for sense pleasures, for being and for ending) and pride, self-deprication, and arrogance must be let go and then further pride in this accomplishment must be got rid of before one can say one has brought pain to an end.

PTS: Craving, Hare, trans., III.310
WP: 106. Craving, 985

XI. Tika Vagga, III.445

PTS: The Threes, Hare, trans., III.310
WP: Chapters Extra to theSet of Fifty: Triads, 985

#107: Rāga Suttaɱ, III.445

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Passion, Hare, trans., III.310
WP: 107. Lust, 985

#108: Duccarita Suttaɱ, III.446

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Doing Ill, Hare, trans., III.311
WP: 108. Misconduct, 985

#109: Vitakka Suttaɱ, III.446

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Thinking, Hare, trans., III.311
WP: 109. Thoughts, 986

#110: Saññā Suttaɱ, III.446

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Thoughts, Hare, trans., III.311
WP: 110. Perceptions, 986

#111: Dhātu Suttaɱ, III.447

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Principles, Hare, trans., III.311
WP: 111. Elements, 986

#112: Assāda Suttaɱ, III.447

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Complacence, Hare, trans., III.311
WP: 112. Gratification, 987

#113: Arati Suttaɱ, III.448

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Discontent, Hare, trans., III.312
WP: 113. Discontent, 987

#114: Asantuṭṭhi Suttaɱ, III.448

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Being Satisfied, Hare, trans., III.312
WP: 114. Contentment, 987

#115: Dovacassatā Suttaɱ, III.448

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Unruliness, Hare, trans., III.312
WP: 115. Difficult to Correct, 987

#116: Uddhacca Suttaɱ, III.449

Three disadvantageous states and the three methods to counteract them.

PTS: Flurry, Hare, trans., III.312
WP: 116. Restlessness, 988

[Past this point there is no agreement between versions of the Pali or the translations with regard to numbering and a reasonable way short of renumbering everything has not been found to avoid the fact that some numbers overlap.]

XII. Sāmañña Vagga, aka Vaggāsaŋgahitā Suttantā, III.449

Contemplation (of the Body as Body)

PTS: The Recital, Hare, trans., III.313
WP: Asceticism, 988

#117-132: Kāyānupassī — Ajjhattabahiddha Dhammesu Dhammānupassī Suttaɱ, III.449 [the PTS text has this numbered as 117 and 118]

PTS: Contemplation (of Body — of Thoughts as Thoughts Both in Relation to Self and Outside), Hare, trans., III.313 [The PTS has this numbered as 117 and 118-130 and has abridged the latter group and has either omitted to count, or intends not to include (it is not clear from the abridgment) (following the PTS text, but not the BJT text) the first case of Vedana, Citta, and Dhamma.]
WP: 117. Contemplating the Body, 988
WP: 118. Contemplating the Body Internally, 988

#119: Tapussa Suttaɱ, III.450

WP: 119. Tapussa, 989

#120: Bhallikādi Visati Suttāni, III.451

A declaration by the Buddha that 21 different laymen had achieved the deathless (attained Arahantship).

WP: 120-139. Bhallika, Etc.v

PTS 131-151: He sees the deathless, III.313
BD: #131-151 Lay Arahants Olds trans.
anIII.XII.131.mp3

BD: #132-151 Lay Arahants Olds trans.
[132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141] [142] [143] [144] [145] [146] [147] [148] [149] [150] [151]
PTS: 132-151, III.314 [132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141] [142] [143] [144] [145] [146] [147] [148] [149] [150] [151]

#152-154: Chakkanipāte Rāgādipeyyāla Sūttāni, III.451 [PTS Pali Text has these numbered 121-123]

PTS 152-154: (For Full Understanding) of Passion, III.452

WP: Lust and So Forth Repetition Series, 990

WP: 140, 141, 142, 143-169, 170-649. 990-991.

#155-181: Chakkanipāte Rāgādipeyyāla Sūttāni, III.451 [PTS Pali Text has these included in 124]

For the Comprehension of Passion Series.

PTS 155-181: (For Full Understanding) of Passion, III.315

#182-661: Chakkanipāte Rāgādipeyyāla Sūttāni, III.451 [PTS Pali Text has these included in 124]

For the Comprehension of Passion Series.

PTS 182-661: Of Other Conditions, III.315


 [Anguttara Nikaya Index]  [Ekanipata]  [Dukanipata]  [Tikanipata]  [Catukkanipata]  [Pancakanipata]  [Chakkanipata]  [Sattakanipata]  [Atthakanipata]  [Navakanipata]  [Dasakanipata]  [Ekadasakanipata]


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement   Webmaster's Page