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Index of the Suttas of the
Aŋguttara Nikāya
Navaka-Nipāta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

Aŋguttara Nikāya

PTS: Aŋguttara Nikāya, The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
Volume IV Sevens, Eights and Nines, ed. by E. Hardy, London: Pali Text Society 1899.

BJT: Aŋguttara Nikāya, The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text
Volume IV Sevens, Eights and Nines.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT]. Pali vagga titles are links to this version of the Pali. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the WP Bhk. Bodhi and ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Much, but not all the Pali has been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many of the suttas have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Book of the Gradual Sayings or More-Numbered Suttas
ATI: Translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight
WP: The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha, Bhikkhu Bodhi translation
BD: The M. Olds translations

9. Nava Nipāta) IV.231

PTS: The Book of the Nines
ATI: Book of the Nines
WP: The Book of the Nines

I. Sambodha-Vagga, IV.351

PTS: The awakening, IV.231
WP: Enlightenment, 1245

#1: Sambodhi-Pakkhiya Suttaɱ, IV.350

Nine things called 'Wings to Awakening'.

PTS: The awakening, IV.231
ATI: Self-awakening
MNL: Enlightenment, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 1. Enlightenment, 1245

#2: Nissaya-Sampanna Suttaɱ, IV.353

Nine conditions which when present justify the thought that one is 'well-seated'.

PTS: Reliant, IV.233
MNL: Supportive Condition, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 2. Support, 1247

#3: Meghiya Suttaɱ, IV.354

Nine conditions which help to mature the immature mind.

PTS: The Venerable Meghiya, IV.234
MNL: Venerable Meghiya, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 3. Meghiya, 1247

#4: Nandaka Suttaɱ, IV.358

Four things which must be brought to perfection, and five advantages of hearing Dhamma.

PTS: The Venerable Nandaka, IV.237
MNL: Venerable Nandaka, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 4. Nandaka, 1251

#5: Balasaŋgahavatthu Suttaɱ, IV.363

The Buddha defines the powers of wisdom, energy, faultlessness and sympathy; having mastered these one has passed beyond fear that one is living in error, fear of a bad reputation, fear of being ill at ease in various groups, fear of death, and fear of a bad rebirth.

PTS: The powers, IV.241
MNL: Powers, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 5. Powers, 1254

#6: Sevitabbāsevitabba Suttaɱ, IV.365

Four sorts of persons, robes, food, shelter, villages and cities, and countries regarded in terms of whether they produce in one an increase of good conditions and a decrease in bad conditions.

PTS: To be sought after, IV.242
MNL: That Should Be Followed After, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 6. Association, 1256

#7: Sutavāparibbājaka Suttaɱ, IV.369

Nine ways in which it is impossible for an Arahant to transgress.

PTS: Sutavan the wanderer, IV.245
ATI: To Sutavan
MNL: To Sutavan, Sister Upalavana, trans.
BD: The Wanderer Sutava, Olds, trans.
WP: 7. Sutavā, 1259

#8: Sajjhāparibbājaka Suttaɱ, IV.371

Nine ways in which it is impossible for an Arahant to transgress.

PTS: Sajjha, the wanderer, IV.246
MNL: The Wandering Ascetic Sajjha, Sister Upalavana, trans.
BD: The Wanderer Sajjha, Olds, trans.
WP: 8. Sajjha, 1260

#9:Puggala Suttaɱ, IV.372

The Buddha lists the nine stages from commoner to Arahant.

PTS: Persons, IV.247
MNL: Great Beings, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 9. Persons, 1261
BD: Men, Olds trans.

#10: Ābuneyya-puggala Suttaɱ, IV.373

Persons on the nine stages to Arahantship are called venerable, worthy of honour, worthy of gifts, worthy of salutations, an excellent place to create good kamma.

PTS: The venerable, IV.247
MNL: Worthy of Honour, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 10. Worthy of Gifts, 1261

II. Sīhanāda-Vagga IV.373

PTS: The Lion Roar, IV.248
WP: The Lion's Roar, 1261

#11: Sāriputta Sīhanāda Suttaɱ, IV.373

The venerable Sariputta is accused of offending a bhikkhu and utters a 'lion's roar' in response.

PTS: After the rainy season, IV.248
MNL: The Lion's Roar, Sister Upalavana, trans.
WP: 11. Lion's Roar, 1261

#12: Sa-upādisesa Suttaɱ, IV.378

Nine sorts of persons who when they die with some attachment remaining are nevertheless free from rebirths in states lower than the human form.

PTS: With attached remainder, Hare, trans., IV.252
BD: With Holding-on, Olds, trans.
MNL: With Substratum Remaining, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 12. With Residue Remaining, 1264

#13: Mahākoṭṭhita Suttaɱ, IV.382

When questioned about the reason for living the Godly life under The Buddha, Sariputta explains that it is for the sake of knowing, seeing, understanding and mastering the Four Truths.

PTS: The venerable MahaKotthita, IV.254
ATI: With Kotthita, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
MNL: Venerable MahaKotthita, Sister Upalavana, trans.
BD: Kotthita, Olds, trans.
WP: 13. Koṭṭhita, 1267

#14: Samiddhi Suttaɱ, IV.385

Sariputta and Samiddhi engage in a dialogue concerning principled thoughts. A short but very instructive sutta pointing to the junction of nama/rupa and consciousness where liberation is to be found. The Olds translation is very close to the Pali in style, so note the severity of the style! Sāriputta's caution at the end would indicate that Samiddhi was not yet Arahant.

PTS: The venerable Samiddhi,, Hare, trans. IV.256
ATI: About Samiddhi, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
BD: Samiddhi, Olds, trans.
MNL: Venerable Samiddhi, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 14. Samiddhi, 1269

#15: Gaṇḍopama Suttaɱ, IV.386

The Buddha describes a boil which has been gatheringfor many years, with nine openings oozing foulness, stench and loathsomness. He does not mention the body.

PTS: A boil, IV.257
ATI: A Boil, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
MNL: An Abscess, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 15. Boil, 1270

#16: Saññā Suttaɱ, IV.387

Nine perceptions which are of great fruit and of great profit.

PTS: Thoughts, IV.258
ATI: Perception, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
MNL: Perceptions, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 16. Perceptions, 1270

#17: Kulopagamana Suttaɱ, IV.387

Nine characteristics of families that make them unwise to visit, and nine that make them fit to visit.

PTS: The family, IV.258
MNL: Families, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 17. Families, 1270

#18: Navaŋāguposatha Suttaɱ, IV.388

Nine thoughts to think about on Uposatha days which makes this observance day very profitable. The BJT Pali is completely mangled and has been straightened up for this version

PTS: Amity, IV.259
MNL: Full Moon Observance with Nine Factors, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 18. Loving-Kindness, 1271

#19: Devatā Suttaɱ, IV.390

Devas report to the Buddha on the sad results of nine flaws in their attitude towards homeless wanderers and the happy results when these flaws were eliminated.

PTS: The Deva Host, IV.260
MNL: The Gods, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 19. Deities, 1273

#20: Velāma Suttaɱ, IV.392

What makes a gift very profitable with an example story from the past.

PTS: Velama, IV.262
ATI: About Velama, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Brahmin Velama, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 20. Velāma, 1273

III. Sattāvāsa-Vagga, IV.396

PTS: Spheres of Beings, IV.265
WP: Abodes of Beings, 1277

#21: Ṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.396

Three ways three sets of beings each excel the other two.

PTS: In three ways, IV.265
WP: 21. Respects, 1277

#22: Khaḷuŋka Suttaɱ, IV.397

Excitable, well-bread, thoroughbred men compared to excitable, well-bread and thoroughbred steeds.

PTS: The excitable steed, IV.266
WP: 22. Wild Colts, 1277

#23: Taṇhā Mūlaka Suttaɱ, IV.400

A paticca samuppada-like sutta progressing from thirst to violence. A digression also found in DN 15.

PTS: Craving, IV.269
WP: 23. Craving, 1280

#24: Sattāvāsa Suttaɱ, IV.401

Nine ways in which beings tend to find rebirth stated in terms of body and consciousness.

PTS: Beings, IV.269
WP: 24. Beings, 1280

#25: Paññāparicita Suttaɱ, IV.402

The Buddha says that one with abundant wisdom may declare arahantship; then he defines what he means by wisdom.

PTS: Wisdom, IV.270
WP: 25. Wisdom, 1281

#26: Silāyūpopama Suttaɱ, IV.402

A debate between Sariputta and Candikaputta concerning what Devadatta taught about declaring arahantship. This is a very interesting sutta. On the surface it is simply a lesson as to precision of speech: the huge difference it can make when saying 'heaped around with thought' versus 'well heaped around with thought'. Then there is the contrast of this sutta with the previous which conveys the basic message but using the term for 'wisdom'. But the most interesting thing going on in the sutta is that it is concerning a statment supposedly made by Devadata. It speaks of Devadata in the past tense, and here Sariputta corrects the bhikkhu quoting Devadatta in a way which makes Devadatta sound wiser than would be the case taking the quote as originally given. Now Devadatta is often painted in solid black where we know from stories here and there that he was, in fact, a highly developed individual who was simply overcome with ambition, so in the name of truth and fairness it is well done that he be defended where he was not being represented well, but I suspect the sutta has been remembered confusidly: that is that the bhikkhu is correctly quoting Devadatta's incorrect recollection of Gotama's utterance in AN 9.25, and Sāriputta was correcting that and that his correction has been misremembered. Maybe not, but if it is as I suggest the deeper message would be in the illustration of Devadatta's fate in the difference in the way he remembered Gotama's instruction. There is some slight evidence that the sutta has been misremembered in the differences between different versions of the Pali where in one case at least there is no difference in the way Candikaputto quotes Devadatta and the way Sāriputta corrrects Candikaputto.

PTS: The Stone Column, IV.271
WP: 26. The Stone Piller, 1282

#27: Paṭhama Verabhaya Suttaɱ, IV.405

The Buddha instructs Anathapindika on the attributes of a Streamwinner that eliminate fear and hate. He also tells him that if he knows he possesses these attributes he may declare himself to be a Stream-winner.

PTS: Dread and hatred a, IV.272
WP: 27. Enmity (1), 1284

#28: Dutiya Verabhaya Suttaɱ, IV.407

The Buddha instructs the bhikkhus that any disciple of the Buddha possessing the attributes that eliminate fear and hate may declare himself to be a Stream-winner. The attributes are defined.

PTS: Dread and hatred b, IV.275
WP: 28. Enmity (2), 1286

#29: Āghāta-vatthu Suttaɱ, IV.406

The nine thoughts which serve as a basis for strife.

PTS: Strife a, IV.275
WP: 29. Resentment (1), 1286

#30: Āghāta-paṭivinaya Suttaɱ, IV.406

The nine thoughts which serve to counteract the nine thoughts which serve as a basis for strife.

PTS: The same b (Dispelling Strife), IV.275
WP: 30. Resentment (2), 1286

#31: Anupubba-nirodha Suttaɱ, IV.409

Nine states which are brought to an end one-by-one as one progresses through the four jhanas and the four arupa jhanas and emerges from the ending of sense-perception and sense-experience.
A short but difficult sutta to understand/translate clearly. My translation offered as food-for-thought.

PTS: Gradual Endings, IV.275
ATI: Step-by-step Stopping, Bhk. Thanissaro translation
BD: Following-earlier-Endings, Olds translation
WP: 31. Progressive Cessation, 1287

IV. Mahā-Vagga, 410 IV.

PTS: The Great Chapter, IV.276
WP: The Great Chapter, 1287

#32: Paṭhama Anupubba-vihāra-samāpatti Suttaɱ, IV.410

Nine states which are brought to an end one-by-one as one progresses through the four jhanas and the four arupa jhanas and emerges from the ending of perception and sense-experience characterized as 'abidings.'

PTS: The abidings a, IV.276
ATI: Dwellings (1)
WP: 32. Dwellings (1), 1287

#33: Dutiya Anupubba-vihāra-samāpatti Suttaɱ, IV.410

The four jhanas and the four arupa-jhanas and the ending of perception and sense-experience are described as a gradual series of abidings.

PTS: The same b, IV.277
ATI: Dwellings (2)
WP: 33. Dwellings (2), 1288

#34: Nibbāna-sukha Suttaɱ, IV.414

Udayin questions Sariputta as to the possibility that where sensation ends, there can be any experience of happiness. Sariputta explains that it is the very ending of sensation that is the happiness being spoken of.

PTS: The cool, IV.279
ATI: Unbinding
WP: 34. Nibbāna, 1292

#35: Gāvīupamā Suttaɱ, IV.418

This is an elegant and very instructive sutta which has been mangled in both the Pali and in translations by abbreviations. The full versions of both the Pali and Hare's translation have been reconstructed here. The Buddha emphasizes with a simile the importance of fully developing each step of the way as one progresses through the jhanas.

PTS: The cow, IV.281
ATI: The Cow
WP: 35. The Cow, 1294

#36: Jhāna-nisasaya Suttaɱ, IV.422

A sutta which shows how at each step from the first jhana through to the ending of perception and sense-experience there is a sequence of thoughts or perceptions or realizations which can bring one to arahantship. A sutta in which it is clearly stated that Arahantship can be attained from the first jhana.
The full versions of Hare's translation has been reconstructed here; the Pali has been left in the BJT expanded version. There is some food for thought here for those concerned with the tampering that may have gone on in the editing of the Pali. A good sutta for those interested in the jhānas. I would caution readers to examine the meaning of 'nissāya'. Here (and with Bhk. Bodhi and Bhk. Thanissaro) it is translated as 'depend.' Literally the word means 'seated on' and I believe the distinction is important. It is especially so in light of the fact that 'paṭicca' and 'nidāna' are all also being translated 'depend' (as well as 'conditioned' ... along with 'sankhāra' ... confused yet?). It is also interesting that in this sutta the scheme changes at the 'Sphere of Nothing's Had' (Nothingness) in a way which illuminates the understanding of 'attainment of perception' [Hare: as far as 'perception prevails'; Bhk. Thanissaro: 'perception-attainments'; Bhk. Bodhi: (combining this and the next term) 'penetration to final knowledge as far as meditative attainments accompanied by perception reach'] [saññā-samāpatti] and 'penetration of gnosis' [aññā-paṭivedho].

PTS: Musing, IV.
ATI: Mental Absorption
WP: 36. Jhāna, 1298

#37: Ānanda Suttaɱ, IV.426

Another in a growing collection of suttas which describes an impersonal consciousness. Not 'Bodhi Mind'! Not something that is always there and simply needs to be realized, not something which when attained is the same as that which was left behind, but a stable, happy, fear-free mind-made freedom-sustained serenity where eye is such that of the realm of shapes there is no resultant personal experience. Please read the M. Olds translation of this sutta for its most reasonable exposition.

PTS: The venerable Ānanda, IV.286
ATI: With Ānanda, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
BD: Ānanda, Olds, trans.
MNL: Venerable Ānanda, Str. Upalavana, trans.
WP: 37. Ānanda, 1301

#38: Lokāyatika Brāhmaṇa Suttaɱ, IV.428

The Buddha explains why it is incorrect to speak of the world as a finite entitity and how it comes about that one can come to the end of the world.
On the theme of reaching the end of the world as in AN 4.45. This sutta ends abruptly and looks to be a fragment only.

PTS: The brahmans, IV.287
ATI: To Two Brahmans
WP: 38. The Brahmins, 1302

#39: Devāsurasaŋgāma Suttaɱ, IV.432

The Buddha describes a false sense of security and refuge and escape from Mara and the true way that there comes about a sense of security that one is free from Mara.

PTS: The devas, IV.290
ATI: The Devas (About Jhāna)
WP: 39. The Devas, 1305

#40: Āraññakanāgopama Suttaɱ, IV.435

The Buddha praises living in solitude.

PTS: The tusker, IV.291
ATI: The Tusker, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
WP: 40. A Bull Elephant, 1307

#41. Tapussa Gahapati Suttaɱ, IV.438

The Buddha describes the benefits of giving all up and the dangers in pleasures of the senses.

PTS: Tapussa, IV.293
ATI: To Tapussa (On Renunciation)
BD: How Come? AN 9 41 [excerpt] as retold by Olds.
WP: 41. Tapussa, 1309

V. Pañcāla-Vagga aka: Sāmañña Vagga, 449 IV.

PTS: The Pañcāla Chapter, IV.295
WP: Similarity, 1318

#42: Pañcāla Suttaɱ, aka Sambādha Suttaɱ, IV.449

The noose and the escape from the noose. The progression of stages on the path to Arahantship is described as a matter of continuously identifying the noose in the present situation and the way to escape.

PTS: Pañcālacaṇḍa, IV.295
ATI: Pañcala's Verse
WP: 42. Confinement, 1318

#43: Kāyasakkhi Suttaɱ, IV.451

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of 'bodily realization.' A seer-in-body is described as one who advances through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body.

PTS: The seer-in-body, IV.297
ATI: Bodily Witness
WP: 43. Body Witness, 1320
BD: Bodily Realization, Olds, trans.

#44: Paññāvimutta Suttaɱ, IV.452

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of being 'wisdom-freed.' One who is wisdom-freed has advanced through the stages to arahantship seeing the wisdom of each stage.

PTS: The wisdom-freed, IV.297
ATI: Released Through Discernment
WP: 44. Wisdom, 1321
BD: Wisdom-Freed, Olds, trans.

#45: Ubhatobhāgavimutta Suttaɱ, IV.453

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of being 'by two-measures freed.' Such a one is both a seer-in-body and wisdom-freed. A seer-in-body is described as one who advances through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body. One who is wisdom-freed has advanced through the stages to arahantship seeing the wisdom of each stage.

PTS: The freed-both-ways, IV.297
ATI: (Released) Both Ways
WP: 45. Both Respects, 1322
BD: By Two Measures Freed, Olds, trans.

#46: Sandiṭṭhiko Suttaɱ, IV.453

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea that Dhamma is to be seen for oneself. One who advances through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom has seen Dhamma for himself in each case.

PTS: To be seen for oneself, IV.297
WP: 46. Directly Visible (1), 1323

#47: Sandiṭṭhikaɱ Nibbānaɱ Suttaɱ, IV.453

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea that Nibbana is to be seen for oneself. One who advances through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom has seen Nibbana for himself in each case.

PTS: The same, IV.298
WP: 47. Directly Visible (2), 1323

#48: Nibbānaɱ Suttaɱ, IV.454

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of Nibbana. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: The cool, IV.298
WP: 48. Nibbāna, 1324

#49: Parinibbānaɱ Suttaɱ, IV.454

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of Final Nibbana. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: The complete cool, IV.298
WP: 49. Final Nibbāna, 1324

#50: Tadaŋga-nibbānaɱ Suttaɱ, IV.454

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of this dimension of Nibbana. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: By these means, IV.298
WP: 50. That Particular Respect, 1324

#51: Diṭṭhadhamma-Nibbānaɱ Suttaɱ, IV.454

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of Nibbana in this seen thing. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: Here and now, IV.298
WP: 51. In This Very Life, 1324

VI. Khema-Vagga, IV.455

PTS: The Security, IV.298
WP: Security, 1324

#52: Khema Suttaɱ, IV.455

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea Security. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: The security, IV.298
WP: 52. Security (1), 1324

#53: Khemappatto Suttaɱ, IV.455

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea The Attainer of Security. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: One who attains the security, IV.298
WP: 53. Security (2), 1325

#54: Amata Suttaɱ, IV.455

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea The Deathless. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: The deathless, IV.298
WP: 54. The Deathless (1), 1325

#55: Amatapatto Suttaɱ, IV.455

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of One Who Attains The Deathless. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: One who attains the deathless, IV.298
WP: 55. The Deathless (2), 1325

#56: Abhaya Suttaɱ, IV.455

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of The Fearless. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: The fearless, IV.298
WP: 56. The Fearless (1), 1325

#57: Abhayappatta Suttaɱ, IV.455

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of One Who Attains The Fearless. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: One who attains the fearless, IV.299
WP: 57. The Fearless (2), 1325

#58: Passaddhi Suttaɱ, IV.455

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of Impassivity. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: Tranquillity, IV.299
WP: 58. Tranquility (1), 1325

#59: Anupubba-passaddhi Suttaɱ, IV.456

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of Gradual Attainment of Impassivity. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: Gradual tranquillity, IV.299
WP: 59. Tranquility (2), 1325

#60: Nirodha Suttaɱ, IV.456

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of Ending. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: Ending, IV.
WP: 60. Cessation, 1326

#61: Anupubba Nirodha Suttaɱ, IV.456

Ananda explains the extent of what the Buddha meant by the idea of Gradually Attained Ending. It is explained as advanceing through the stages to arahantship in each case living in contact with the body and understanding with wisdom.

PTS: Gradual Ending, IV.299
WP: 61. Progressive Cessation, 1326

#62: Arahattā Bhabbābhabba-dhamma Suttaɱ, IV.456

Nine things which must be put away to attain arahantship.

PTS: Possible by putting away things, IV.299
ATI: Capable
WP: 62. Possible and Impossible, 1326

VII. Satipaṭṭhāna-Vagga, IV.457

PTS: The Arisings of Mindfulness, IV.299
WP: Establishments of Mindfulness, 1326

#63: Sikkhādubbalya Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.457

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five obstructions to training.

PTS: The Training, IV.299
ATI: Things That Weaken the Training
WP: 63. The Training, 1326

#64: Nīvaraṇa Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.457

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the the five diversions.

PTS: Hindrances, IV.300
ATI: Nivarana Sutta Hindrances
WP: 64. Hindrances, 1327

#65: Kāmaguṇa Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.458

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five sources of sense desire.

PTS: Sense desire, IV.300
WP: 65. Sensual Pleasure, 1327

#66: Upādānakkhandha Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.458

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five stockpiles that fuel existence.

PTS: The aggregates, IV.301
WP: 66. Aggregates, 1327

#67: Orambhāgiya Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.459

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five yokes to rebirth in lower states.

PTS: The lower fetters, IV.301
WP: 67. Lower Fettters, 1328

#68: Gati Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.459

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the the five realms of existence.

PTS: The courses, IV.301
WP: 68. Destinations, 1328

#69: Macchariya Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.459

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five sorts of meanness

PTS: Meanness, IV.302
WP: 69. Miserliness, 1328

#70: Uddhamabhāgiya Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.460

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five yokes to higher realms of existence.

PTS: The upper fetters, IV.302
WP: 70. Higher Fetters, 1328

#71: Cetokhila Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.460

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five sorts of mental barrenness.

PTS: Mental barrenness, IV.
WP: 71. Mental Barrenness, 1328

#72: Vinibandha Satipaṭṭhāna Suttaɱ, IV.461

The Four settings-up of Mind should be used to eliminate the five sorts of mental bondage

PTS: Mental bondage, IV.
WP: 72. Bondage, 1329

VIII. Sammappadhāna Vagga, IV.462

Using the same formula as for suttas 63-72, but replacing the four settings-up of mind with the four consummate efforts.

PTS: Right Effort, IV.303
WP: Right Strivings, 1330

Pali:

73: Sikkhādubbalya Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
74: Nīvaraṇa Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
75: Kāmaguṇa Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
76: Upādānakkhandha Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
77: Orambhāgiya Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
78: Gati Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
79: Macchariya Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
80: Uddhamabhāgiya Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
81: Cetokhila Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ
82: Vinibandha Sammappadhāna Suttaɱ

PTS:

73: The Training
74: Hindrances
75: Sense Desire
76: The Aggregates
77: The Lower Feters
78: The Courses
79: Meanness
80: The Upper Fetters
81: Mental Barrenness
82: Mental Bondage

WP: 73. The Training, 1330
74-82. Hindrances, Etc., 1330

IX. Iddhipāda Vagga, IV.463

Using the same formula as for suttas 63-72, but replacing the four settings-up of mind with the four paths to magic powers.

PTS: Chapter IX: Psychic Power, 304
WP: Bases for Psychic Potency, 1330

Pali:

83: Sikkhādubbalya Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
84: Nīvaraṇa Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
85: Kāmaguṇa Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
86: Upādānakkhandha Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
87: Orambhāgiya Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
88: Gati Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
89: Macchariya Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
90: Uddhamabhāgiya Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
91: Cetokhila Iddhipāda Suttaɱ
92: Vinibandha Iddhipāda Suttaɱ

PTS:

83: The Training
84: Hindrances
85: Sense Desire
86: The Aggregates
87: The Lower Feters
88: The Courses
89: Meanness
90: The Upper Fetters
91: Mental Barrenness
92: Mental Bondage

WP: 83. The Training, 1330
WP: 84-92. Hindrances, Etc., 1330

X. Rāgādi Peyyālaɱ Vaggo, #93-432 IV.463

From here to the end should be regarded as one sutta. The wheel 'repetition series' on the understanding, etc. of passion, etc.
340 suttas grouped together. Seventeen concepts (passion, hatred, illusion, anger, enmity, hypocrisy, malice, envy, avarice, deceit, craftiness, obstinacy, impetuosity, pride, arrogance, intoxication and indolence) played off against 10 concepts (understanding, comprehension, exhaustion, abandonment, destruction, decay, freedom from desire, ending, quittance, and renunciation), played off against each of two sets of 9 concepts (1. the thought of foulness, of death, of the repulsiveness of food, of universal wretchedness, of impermanence, of ill inimpermanence, of no self in ill, of renunciation, of freedom from passions; and 2. the first musing (jhāna), second musing, third musing, fourth musing, sphere of infinite space, sphere of infinite consciousness, sphere of nothingness, sphere of neither perception nor non-perception, and the ending of perception and feeling). The Pali has been left in it's abbreviated state as for most users this will actually be easier to compare with the English than if fully rolled out.
This is the first time these have been seen in English fully rolled out. A truly mind-stretching exercise! Thank goodness for copy and paste.

PTS: Passion, IV.305
WP: Lust and So Forth Repetition Series, 1330

Pali 93: Navasaññā Suttaɱ
PTS 93: The understanding of passion a, IV.305
WP: 93. 1330

Pali 94: Jhānasamāpatti Suttaɱ
PTS 94: The same b, IV.305
WP: 94. 1330

Pali: 95-112
PTS 95-112: Of passion, IV.305
WP: 95-112. 1330

Pali: 113-432
PTS 113-432: Of other conditions, IV.305
WP: 113-432. 1330


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