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Index to the Suttas of the Saɱyutta Nikāya
Saḷāyatana Vagga
Saḷāyatana Saɱyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

IV. Saḷāyatana Vagga

PTS: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 4, Saḷāyatana-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1894. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 4, Saḷāyatana-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on the Sixfold Sphere of Sense and Other Subjects, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Book of the Six Sense Bases, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight.
BD: The translations of M. Olds

I. Saḷāyatana Saɱyutta, III.202

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on the Sixfold Sphere of Sense, IV.1
WP: Connected Discourses on the Six Sense Bases, II.1133

I. First Fifty

I. Anicca Vagga, IV.1

1. Ajjhatta Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.1

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind are inconstant, painful and not self and that seeing that brings freedom and recognizing that freedom as freedom rebirth is left behind, the godly life has been lived, duty's doing has been done and there is no more being any sort of an it at any place of atness left for one.
Note that in terms of the senses, the sixth sense organ is 'mano', 'mind', and refers to the mind of an individual. 'Mano' in other places will refer to the mind of the Arahant, freed from the corrupting influences. When 'mind' refers to an individual it incompasses 'citta', 'heart' (the center of the emotions and mental states), and 'sati', 'mind' (meaning remembering, investigating and paying attention).

PTS: Impermanent (i): the personal, IV.1
WP: The Internal as Impermanent, II.1133

2. Ajjhatta Dukkha Suttaɱ, IV.2

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind are painful and not self and that seeing that brings freedom and recognizing that freedom as freedom rebirth is left behind, the godly life has been lived, duty's doing has been done and there is no more being any sort of an it at any place of atness left for one.

PTS: Ill (i): The Personal, IV.2
WP: The Internal as Suffering, II.1134

3. Ajjhatta Anattā Suttaɱ, IV.2

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind are not self and that seeing that brings freedom and recognizing that freedom as freedom rebirth is left behind, the godly life has been lived, duty's doing has been done and there is no more being any sort of an it at any place of atness left for one.

PTS: Void of the Self (i): The Personal, IV.2
WP: The Internal as Nonself, II.1134

4. Bāhira Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.2

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that shapes, sounds, scents, savours, touches and things perceptable to the mind are inconstant, painful and not self and that seeing that brings freedom and recognizing that freedom as freedom rebirth is left behind, the godly life has been lived, duty's doing has been done and there is no more being any sort of an it at any place of atness left for one.
Note that here the object of the mind sense is 'dhamma', 'things'. Bhk. Bodhi: 'mental phenomena'; Woodward: 'mind-states' (which would be better reserved for 'citta' — look at the distinction between citta and dhamma in the the Maha Satipatthana Sutta). 'Dhamma' (lower case 'd') can correctly be translated 'phenomena', but the addition of 'mental' to this term here is an explanation, not a translation. The objects of the mind sense are the sense-consciousnesses of the other five senses plus memories. In the same way that a computer program is built up from short bits of information — some directly input, others held in memory — which interact in such a way as to produce intelligible images, actions, conclusions and new memories, the images produced by the five lower senses are composed in ways directed by memory into composite pictures which are in turn composed into animated stories ... (whether they make good sense or not! ... garbage in - garbage out.)

PTS: Impermanent (ii): the External, IV.
WP: The External as Impermanent, II.1134

5. Bāhira Dukkha Suttaɱ, IV.3

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that shapes, sounds, scents, savours, touches and things perceptable to the mind are painful and not self and that seeing that brings freedom and recognizing that freedom as freedom rebirth is left behind, the godly life has been lived, duty's doing has been done and there is no more being any sort of an it at any place of atness left for one.

PTS: Ill (ii): the External, IV.3
WP: The External as Suffering, II.1135

6. Bāhira Anattā Suttaɱ, IV.3

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that shapes, sounds, scents, savours, touches and things perceptable to the mind are not self and that seeing that brings freedom and recognizing that freedom as freedom rebirth is left behind, the godly life has been lived, duty's doing has been done and there is no more being any sort of an it at any place of atness left for one.

PTS: Void of the Self (ii): the External, IV.3
WP: The External as Nonself, II.1135

7. Dutiya Ajjhatta Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.4

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind were impermanent in the past, will be impermanent in the future and are impermanent now and that seeing that one should strive to be repelled by them, become dispassionate towards them, and look for their ending.

PTS: Impermanent (iii): the Personal, IV.3
WP: The Internal as Impermenent in the Three Times, II.1136

8. Dutiya Ajjhatta Dukkha Suttaɱ, IV.4

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind were painful in the past, will be painful in the future and are painful now and that seeing that one should strive to be repelled by them, become dispassionate towards them, and look for their ending.

PTS: Ill (iii): the Personal, IV.3
WP: The Internal as Suffering in the Three Times, II.1136

9. Dutiya Ajjhatta Anatta Suttaɱ, IV.4

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind were not self in the past, will be not self in the future and are not self now and that seeing that one should strive to be repelled by them, become dispassionate towards them, and look for their ending.

PTS: Void of the Self (iii): the Personal, (listed in error as 'external') IV.3
WP: The Internal as Nonself in the Three Times, II.1136

10. Dutiya Bāhira Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.5

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that visible objects, sounds, scents, savours, touches, and things were impermanent in the past, will be impermanent in the future and are impermanent now and that seeing that one should strive to be repelled by them, become dispassionate towards them, and look for their ending.

PTS: Impermanent (iv): the External, IV.4
WP: 10-12: The External as Impermanent in the Three times, Etc., II.1136

11. Dutiya Bāhira Dukkha Suttaɱ, IV.5

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that visible objects, sounds, scents, savours, touches, and things were painful in the past, will be painful in the future and are painful now and that seeing that one should strive to be repelled by them, become dispassionate towards them, and look for their ending.

PTS: Ill iv, the External, IV.4

12. Dutiya Bāhira Anatta Suttaɱ, IV.6

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that visible objects, sounds, scents, savours, touches, and things were not self in the past, will be not self in the future and are not self now and that seeing that one should strive to be repelled by them, become dispassionate towards them, and look for their ending.

PTS: Void of the Self iv: the External, IV.4

II. Yamaka Vagga, IV.6

13. Sambodha (Sambodhena) Suttaɱ, IV.6

The Buddha describes the reasoning that went on in his mind concerning the personal six senses that lead to his enlightenment.
A teaching which is repeated again and again throughout the suttas. Vital to understand and much more difficult to practice than it appears. Sit down and reviewing the sutta in your mind attempt to see in your own world the facts he is describing. Should be read and practiced along with the next sutta.

PTS: By Enlightenment, IV.4
WP: 13-14: Before My Enlightenment 1-2, II.1136

14. Dutiya Sambodha (Sambodhhena 2) Suttaɱ, IV.8

The Buddha describes the reasoning that went on in his mind concerning the six external objects of sense that lead to his enlightenment.

PTS: By Enlightenment 2, IV.5

15. Assādapariyesana (Assādena 1) Suttaɱ, IV.8

The Buddha describes the perceptions he had concerning the personal six senses that lead him to conclude he was enlightened.
This sutta should be read together with the next sutta. See also in this regard SN 3.22.26 for the description of the method but using in this case the khandhas, and SN 3.22.27 for the perceptions also using the khandhas. The lesson here is that these two sets of ideas are equivalents. Some people may find it easier to examine themselves by the one way, others by the other way. If you want confidence that you are capable of answering random questions concerning Dhamma (that is if you are interested in being a Dhamma teacher) it is vital to understand the variety of sets of equivalents.

PTS: By Satisfaction, IV.5
WP: 15-16: Seeking Gratification 1-2, II.1137

16. Dutiya Assādapariyesana (Assādena 2) Suttaɱ, IV.9

The Buddha describes the perceptions he had concerning the external six sense objects that lead him to conclude he was enlightened.

PTS: By Satisfaction 2, IV.6

17. No Ve Assāda (No Cetena 1) Suttaɱ, IV.10

The Buddha explains that one must see the satisfactions, disadvantages, and the way of escape from the personal sense spheres in order to attain enlightenment.

PTS: Without Satisfaction, IV.6
WP: 17-18: If There Were No 1-2, II.1138

18. Dutiya No Ve Assāda (No Cetena 2) Suttaɱ, IV.12

The Buddha explains that one must see the satisfactions, disadvantages, and the way of escape from the spheres of the external sense objects in order to attain enlightenment.

PTS: Without Satisfaction 2, IV.7

19. Paṭhama Abhinanda Suttaɱ, IV.13

He who takes delight in the personal senses is not free from Pain; he who does not take delight in the personal senses is free from pain.
Note here the implication that 'taking delight' is a willful act, not something that simply happens to one.

PTS: By Taking Delight In, IV.7
WP: 19-20: Delight 1-2, II.1139

20. Dutiya Abhinanda Suttaɱ, IV.13

He who takes delight in external sense objects is not free from Pain; he who does not take delight in external sense objects is free from pain.

PTS: By Taking Delight In (ii), IV.7

21. Paṭhama Uppāda Suttaɱ, IV.14

The Buddha teaches that the setting up of the personal sense organs is the setting up of pain, the ending of the personal sense organs is the ending of pain.

PTS: By the Uprising (i), IV.7
WP: 21-22: Arising of Suffering 1-2, II.1139

22. Dutiya Uppāda Suttaɱ, IV.14

The Buddha teaches that the setting up of the external sense objects is the setting up of pain, the ending of the external sense objects is the ending of pain.
Note that the setting up of the sense objects is not the creation of the sense objects; it is the work of going about to get them.

PTS: By the Uprising 2, IV.8

III. Sabba Vaggo, IV.15

23. Sabba Suttaɱ, IV.15

The Buddha describes what in his system accounts for absolutely everything in existence, calling it 'The All.'
Bhikkhu Thanissaro discusses in a footnote the question as to whether or not The All is intended to encompass Nibbana and whether, if Nibbana is not a dhamma, it can be considered The Self.
The All describes all that which has been own-made, (sankhāra-ed), that which has become (or which has becoming), a development of the conjunction of nāma/rūpa with consciousness, what we call 'all existing things'; an equivalent of the khandhas. Beyond that there is no thing (dhamma) which can be said to have existence. Nibbāna on the other hand, is not own-made, it is not a thing, the consciousness arising from and conscious of named/shapes. So the All includes the individualized (sankhāra-ed) mind and dhammas (things) and the idea of Nibbāna, but not Nibbāna. Because Nibbāna is not-become, does not have existence as understood in this way, it is therefore impossible to point to it.

BD: The All
BD: The All
PTS: The All, IV.8
WP: The All, II.1140
ATI: The All

24. Paṭhama Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.15

The Buddha teaches Dhamma for letting go of The All.

PTS: Abandoning, IV.8
WP: Abandonment 1, II.1140
ATI: For Abandoning
BD: For Letting Go

25. Dutiya Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.16

The Buddha teaches Dhamma for letting go of The All through thoroughly known higher knowledge.
Accomplish letting go by way of abhiññā pariññā. Abhiññā could be, as Bhk. Bodhi has it, 'direct knowledge', if one thinks of over-knowing as observing directly, but the term is most frequently associated with higher knowledge or at least superior knowledge close to magic powers. I think now that 'superior knowledge' would work best for all situations. Seeing the origin and passing away of things is superior to the common way of seeing things as stable in one's world. Pariññā is easier. Pari = pass around = all-round = thorough. One is to see the unstable nature of a thing by obsering that it comes to be and passes out of existence. That is your superior knowledge. Then one applies one's understanding that that which is unstable is painful because we do not like our pleasures to end and that which is painful is not worthy to be called the self or one's own. Seeing and understanding in this way one sees that a thing can give no lasting satisfaction and is therefore not worth pursuiing and one lets one's desire for it fade out. By the ending of desire, the thing is let go.

PTS: Abandoning 2, IV.9
WP: Abandonment 2, II.1141

26. Paṭhama Parijānāna Suttaɱ, IV.17

The Buddha teaches that it is because of lack of mastery, thorough knowledge, dispassion, and letting go of The All that the body of pain is not destroyed, but that with mastery, thorough knowledge, dispassion towards and letting go of The All, the body of pain may be destroyed.

PTS: Comprehension (i), IV.9
WP: Full Understanding, II.1141

27. Dutiya Parijānāna Suttaɱ, IV.18

The Buddha teaches that with mastery, thorough knowledge, dispassion towards and letting go of The All, the body of pain may be destroyed.

PTS: Comprehension 2, IV.10
WP: Full Understanding 2, II.1142

28. Aditta Suttaɱ, IV.19

A fire-and-brimstone preaching in which the Buddha declares the realms of the senses to be in flames. The Woodward translation is fully rolled out as is the Pali. My translation of this was very early (for me) and was going for drama. None of the other translations is complete. Delivered by someone who can be taken seriously it is enough to make one get busy. Originally delivered to 'the Three Kassapas' and their followers, it resulted in the entire group of one thousand becoming Arahant on the spot. A really good case for those who argue that Arahantship can be had without going through the four jhāanas. This was the third sutta delivered by Gotama.

BD: In Flames!
The All is in Flames
PTS: On Fire, IV.10
WP: Burning, II.1143
ATI: The Fire Sermon Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans
The Fire Sermon, Nanamoli Thera, trans

29. Andhabhūtam Suttaɱ, IV.20

The Buddha teaches that the six sense realms are afflicted by aging, sickness and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair.
A variation on the previous.
Both Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi agree with the commentary in reading aḍḍhabhūtam for the andhabhūtam of the PTS text. Bhk. Bodhi translates 'weighed down'. I see no reason to object to andhabhūtam: which would be 'being blinded by'. The difference is orientation towards the being. Aḍḍhabhūtam suggests the affliction by these things of the being; andhabhūtam suggest the being blinded by these things of the mind. The latter would more closely adhere to the aims of the Dhamma.

PTS: Afflicted, IV.11
WP: Weighed Down, II.1144

30. Sāruppa-Paṭipadā Suttaɱ, IV.21

The Buddha presents the best method for the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'
The important word to understand here and in the next two suttas is maññati: to think about, to form an opinion about, to adopt a point of view about. PED: to think, to be of opinion, to imagine, to deem. Woodward's 'conceit' introduces more complexity to the idea than is necessary, and does not well fit the usual way the word is used (e.g.: in the expression: 'What do you think about this?' or 'What is your opinion about this?'). 'Conceit' is frequently used in the PTS translations with the apparent intent 'to have an unwarranted notion that a certain thing is the self or one's own', but in most cases, as here, would would better be understood in the sense of 'having an opinion about', 'having a point of view about'. It is not observation that is the danger, it is forming opinions about what is observed that is the danger. Bhk. Bodhi appears to be using the word 'conceive' in the sense of create, to think up, to imagine the thing itself, which is I suggest a misunderstanding of the suttas. At the least it doesn't hold up across the set of applications that are to be avoided. "He does not think about; he does not think about the sensations that arise from; he does not think 'in that', 'of that'; he does not think 'I am that' 'this is my'. What is being spoken of here is the formation of points of view subsequent to observation where it is being pointed out that whatever opinion one forms is immediately wrong because things being in a constant state of becoming, change and cannot, because of that, be or belong to the self. See also for this idea The Mulapariyaya Sutta.

PTS: Proper, IV.11
WP: Appropriate for Uprooting, II.1144

31. Sappāya-Paṭipadā Suttaɱ, IV.23

The Buddha presents a walk to walk to begin the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'
A variation on the previous sutta. The curious thing here is the omition of the reference to The All. Substituted for that is the identical construction but using the khandhas. Some ideas that occur: The omition is a mistake. The omition is deliberate and points to the equivalence of the khandhas with The All. The titles may point to the significance. The first 'Sāruppa-Paṭipadā'  SĀRUPPA: 'a shapely walk to walk' PED: fit, suitable, proper. > SA = with; RŪPA = shape, taken to mean 'equal to'; PAṬIPADĀ = path to walk; PED: means of reaching a goal or destination, path, way, means, method, mode of progress; Woodward: a way that is proper; Bhk. Bodhi: 'a way that is appropriate'. The second: 'Sappāya-Paṭipadā' 'a walk to walk to begin' SAPPĀYA > SAṄ = with, own, con; + (according to PED) = pass, but possibly also + PĀYA > PĀ+Ā+YA = 'pass to whatever', 'to begin with'; PED: to start out; nstr. pāyena (adv.) for the most part, commonly, usually; PED: likely, beneficial, fit, suitable; Woodward: 'a way that is helpful'; Bhk. Bodhi: 'a way that is suitable'. Reading with me the possibility exists that what the Buddha is suggesting is a good way to begin the analysis is to conceptualize the all in terms of the khandhas, to fit the eye and sights, etc. into the scheme of the khandhas.

PTS: Helpful (i), IV.12
WP: Suitable for Uprooting, II.1145

32. Dutiya Sappāya-Paṭipadā Suttaɱ, IV.24

The Buddha presents a walk to walk to begin the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'
A variation on the previous sutta using dialogue between the bhikkhus and himself concerning the impermanance of things and the wisdom of not identifying with such as the self or belonging to the self.

PTS: Helpful 2, IV.12
WP: Suitable for Uprooting 2, II.1146

IV. Jāti-Dhamma Vaggo, IV.26

PTS: The Chapter on Quality of Rebirth, IV.14.

 

33. Jāti Suttaɱ, IV.26

Coversing suttas 33-42. The Buddha lists ten things that are aspects of the senses which when seen as they really are lead to dispassion and freedom from them leading to Arahantship.
Each of these things is '-dhamma', which both Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi translate 'subject to'. But this is torturing the word 'dhamma': Woodward's note: "dhamma: having the quality of, the rule of; hence 'subject to,' 'liable to.'" The simple: "Is a rebirth-thing ... an aging-thing, etc." would do just as well.
There is in the series both the term 'jarā' and 'vaya'. Woodward translates: 'age' and 'growing old'; Bhk. Bodhi: 'aging' and 'vanishing'. 'jarā' is most commonly encountered in the compound 'jarā-maraṇa' usually translated 'aging and death'; The etymology of 'vayā' found in PED is interesting: ... vayo (age) is connected with Sanskrit vīra = Latin vir. man, hero, vīs strength; Gr.i)/s sinew, i)/fios strong; Sanskrit vīḍayati to make fast, also veshati; whereas vayas (fowl) corresponds with Sanskrit vayasa (bird) and vih. to Gr. ai)eto/s eagle, oi)wno/s bird of prey, Latin avis bird] age, especially young age, prime, youth; meaning "old age" when characterized as such or contrasted to youth (the ord. term for old age being jarā). To form a more distinct difference we might translated vaya: 'weakening.'

PTS: Birth, IV.14
WP: Subject to Birth, II.1147

34. Jarā Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Age, IV.14
WP: 34-42: Subject to Aging, etc., II.1147

35. Vyādhi Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Sickness, IV.14

36. Maraṇa Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Death, IV.14

37. Soko Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Sorrow, IV.14

38. Saɱkilesa Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Impurity, IV.14

39. Khaya Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Dissolution, IV.14

40. Vaya Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Growing Old, IV.14

41. Samudaya Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Uprising, IV.14

42. Nirodha Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Ceasing to Be, IV.14

V. Sabbā Nicca Vagga, IV.28

PTS: The Chapter on Impermanence, IV.14.

 

43. Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.26

Covering suttas 43-52. The Buddha lists ten things that are aspects of the senses which when seen as they really are lead to dispassion and freedom from them leading to Arahantship.

PTS: Impermanent, IV.14
WP: 43-52: Impermanent, Etc., II.1147

44. Dukkha Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Woeful, IV.14

45. Anattā Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Void of Self, IV.14

46. Abhiññeyya Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: To Be Fully Known, IV.14

47. Pariññeyya Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: To Be Comprehended, IV.14

48. Pahātabba Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: To Be Abandoned, IV.14

49. Sacchikātabba Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: To Be Realized, IV.14

50. Abhiññāpariññeyya Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: To Be Comprehended by Full Knowledge, IV.14

51. Upadduta Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Oppressed, IV.14

52. Upassaṭṭha Suttaɱ, IV.26

PTS: Afflicted, IV.14

II. Second Fifty

I. Avijjā Vagga, IV.30

53. Avijjā-Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.30

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu what it is that causes blindness to vanish and knowledge to arise.

PTS: Ignorance, IV.15
WP: Abandoning Ignorance, II.1148

54. Saŋyojana-Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.31

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu what it is that results in letting go of the yokes to rebirth

PTS: Fetters (i), IV.15
WP: Abandoning the Fetters, II.1148

55. Saŋyojana-Samugghāta Suttaɱ, IV.31

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu the method for exterpating the yokes to rebirth.

PTS: Fetters (ii), IV.15
WP: Uprooting the Fetters, II.1148

56. Āsava-Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.32

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu what it is that results in letting go of the disrupting influences.

PTS: The Āsavas (i), IV.15
WP: 56-59: Abandoning the Taints, Etc., II.1148

57. Āsava-Samugghāta Suttaɱ, IV.32

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu the method for exterpating the disrupting influences.

PTS: The Āsavas (ii), IV.15

58. Anusya-Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.32

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu what it is that results in letting go of the secondary associations of a bad habit.

PTS: Lurking Tendency 1, IV.15

59. Anusya-Samugghāta Suttaɱ, IV.32

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu the method for exterpating the secondary associations of a bad habit.

PTS: Lurking Tendency 2, IV.15

60. Sabbūpādāna-Pariññā Suttaɱ, IV.32

The Buddha delivers a lecture on a method for the complete understanding of all that is comprised under the heading of 'set-ups' or 'fuel' for further existence.

PTS: Comprehension, IV.16
WP: The Full Understanding of All Clinging, II.1149

61. Paṭhama Sabbūpādāna-Pariyādinna Suttaɱ, IV.33

The Buddha delivers a lecture on a method for the complete breaking open of all that is comprised under the heading of 'set-ups'.

PTS: Exhausting (i), IV.16
WP: The Exhaustion of All Clinging 1, II.1149

62. Dutiya Sabbūpādāna-Pariyādinna Suttaɱ, IV.34

The Buddha delivers a lecture on a method for the complete breaking open of all that is comprised under the heading of 'set-ups'.

PTS: Exhausting 2, IV.16
WP: The Exhaustion of All Clinging 2, II.1150

II. Migajāla Vagga, IV.35

63. Paṭhama Migajālena Suttaɱ, IV.35

The Buddha defines what it really means to be considered one who lives in solitude.

PTS: By Migajāla, IV.16
WP: Migajāla 1, II.1150
ATI: To Migajala

64. Dutiya Migajālena Suttaɱ, IV.37

Migajala asks for a teaching in brief and is told that with desire for things of the senses there comes bondage, with the end of desire for things of the senses, the end of bondage.
A variation of the previous sutta with a change of context. It is interesting that the previous sutta did not have the effect of stimulating Migajala to attain arahantship, whereas the second time he heard the same message, this time within the context of a teaching that would lead to arahantship, it did.

PTS: Migajāla 2, IV.18
WP: Migajāla 2, II.1151

65. Samiddhi-Māra-Pañha Suttaɱ, IV.38

Samiddhi inquires about Mara, the Evil One, and is told that whatever there is of the realm of the senses, that is Mara and that is what defines a being, and that is where there is Pain and that is a description of the world.

PTS: Samiddhi (i), IV.19
WP: Samiddhi 1, II.1152

66. Samiddhi-Satta-Pañha Suttaɱ, IV.39

Samiddhi inquires about Beings, and is told that whatever there is of the realm of the senses, that is a being.

PTS: Samiddhi (ii), IV.20
WP: Samiddhi 2, II.1153

67. Samiddhi-Dukkha-Pañha Suttaɱ, IV.39

Samiddhi inquires about Dukkha (Pain), and is told that whatever there is of the realm of the senses, that is Pain.

PTS: Samiddhi (iii)-4, IV.20
WP: Samiddhi 3, II.1153

68. Samiddhi-Loka-Pañha Suttaɱ, IV.39

Samiddhi inquires about the World, and is told that whatever there is of the realm of the senses, that is the World.

PTS: Samiddhi (iv), IV.20
WP: Samiddhi 4, II.1153

69. Upasena Suttaɱ, IV.40

Upasena has been bitten by a snake and wishes to die outdoors. He is taken out and before he dies is questioned by Sariputta as to why it is that he shows no change in his sense-faculties or countenance. Upasena declares that there is not in him any idea of I-making or mine-making with regard to the senses.
Woodward translates the last part of the dialogue "Now the venerable Upasena had ... Therefore the venerable Upasena had..." giving the impression that this is a comment being made by the narrator, but it is a comment being made in response to Upasena by Sariputta so I have altered it slightly to make that point clearer. I have noted this fact in a footnote. Bhk. Bodhi in his translation puts this more clearly.
Note here the use of the terms 'ahaṃ-kāra-mamiṃ-kāra'  'I-making-mine-making' (PED: kāra from "from kr") which I suggest provides precident for understanding saŋ-khāra as 'own-making.' PED spells 'Sankhāra' but has "from saŋ+kr"

PTS: Upasena, IV.20
WP: Upasena, II.1154
ATI: Upasena

70. Upavāṇa Suttaɱ, IV.41

The venerable Upavana inquires about the description of the Dhamma as being within view, timeless, come-see-able, leading-on, individually to be experienced by the cognizant.
A very informative sutta! As well as being a description of what it means when it is said that this Dhamma is to be seen by one's self in this visible state, it describes the awakened and the blind mind as being identical in the experience of the sense-realms but differing only in the presence or absense of lust for such together with knowledge of it's internal presence or absense.

PTS: Upavāṇa IV.21
WP: Upavāṇa, II.1154

71. Paṭhama Chaphassāyatana Suttaɱ, IV.43

The Buddha explains to a bhikkhu that seeing the six sense realms as not-self or belonging to the self is the end of pain.
A bhikkhu is thrown into doubt when the Buddha tells the bhikkhus that those who do not see the appearance, the retirement, the satisfaction and misery, and the escape from the sixfold sphere of contact do not understand the Dhamma or follow the Discipline, for he perceives himself as not yet seeing these things as they really are. Then when the Buddha asks him if he sees the eye as 'me', 'mine' 'my self' the bhikkhu answers he does not. And the Buddha says that there you have it, that seeing the eye in this way is the method for seeiing the the appearance, the retirement, the satisfaction and misery, and the escape from the eye, etc.

PTS: Concerning the Sixfold Sphere of Contact 1, IV.22
WP: The Six Bases for Contact 1, II.1155

72. Dutiya Chaphassāyatana Suttaɱ, IV.44

The Buddha explains to a bhikkhu that seeing the six sense realms as not-self or belonging to the self the contrary perception does not arise again.
The same as the previous sutta but concluding "...so as to become again no more in future time" for 'that is the end of ill'.
Here the Buddha is pointing to the necessity of taking the perception 'this is not' to the point where, like the last fading out of the temptation to engage in a bad habit, the idea 'This is' does not arise again.

PTS: 72: Concerning the Sixfold Sphere of Contact 2, IV.22
WP: The Six Bases for Contact 2, II.1156

73. Tatiya Chaphassāyatana Suttaɱ, IV.44

The Buddha presents a walk to walk to begin the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'

PTS: 73: Concerning the Sixfold Sphere of Contact 3, IV.22
WP: The Six Bases for Contact 3, II.1156

III. Gilāna Vagga, IV.46

74. Gilāna Suttaɱ, IV.46

A sick bhikkhu is visited by the Buddha and taught the walk to walk to begin the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'

PTS: Sick (i), IV.23
WP: Sick (1), II.1157
ATI: Ill (1) Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

75. Dutiya Gilāna Suttaɱ, IV.47

A sick bhikkhu is visited by the Buddha and taught the walk to walk to begin the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'

PTS: Sick (ii), IV.25
WP: Sick (2), II.1159
ATI: Ill (2) Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

76. Anicca Suttaɱ (aka: Rādha Suttaɱ (i)), IV.48

Radha asks the Buddha for a teaching in brief and is told desire for that which is impermanent must be let go.
What is impermanent is explained as the eye, visible objects, visual consciousness, eye-contact, and the sensations that result from contact with the eye; ear ...; nose...; tongue...; body...; and mind.
There is no explanation as to why this and the following two suttas are placed in a chapter on the sick.

PTS: Rādha (i), IV.25
WP: Rādha 1, II.1159

77. Dukkha Suttaɱ (aka: Rādha Suttaɱ (ii)), IV.49

Radha asks the Buddha for a teaching in brief and is told desire for that which is painful must be let go.

PTS: 77: Rādha (ii), IV.26
WP: Rādha 2, II.1160

78. Anatta Suttaɱ (aka: Rādha Suttaɱ (iii)),, IV.49

Radha asks the Buddha for a teaching in brief and is told desire for that which is not self must be let go.

PTS: 77: Rādha (iii), IV.26
WP: Rādha 3, II.1160

79. Pathama Avijjā Suttaɱ, IV.49

A bhikkhu asks if there might just one thing which if let go will result in blindness disappearing and vision arising. He is told that there is.
Note that here is at least one case of where 'avijja' ('blindness', or 'not-vision') is directly contrasted with 'vijja' ('vision').

PTS: Ignorance (i), IV.26
WP: Abandoning Ignorance 1, II.1160

80. Dutiya Avijjā Suttaɱ, IV.50

A bhikkhu asks if there might just one thing which if let go will result in blindness disappearing and vision arising. He is told that there is.
A different answer. The BJT Pali for this sutta repeats the opening refrain for each of the senses. This is not found in the PTS or CSCD texts and is out of place and has been eliminated here.
Woodward has translated the word 'aññato' 'other', by 'changeable'. This is, with a certain amount of contortion, not incorrect, but misses the idea which is that the eye, etc. should be regarded as 'other'. That is other than the self or one's own. One can regard a thing as changeable but still regard it as one's own or one's self. Bhk. Bodhi has 'differently'; Bhk. Thanissaro: 'something separate'. Something different or separate can also be regarded as one's own.

PTS: Ignorance (ii), IV.26
WP: Abandoning Ignorance 2, II.1161
ATI: Ignorance, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
BD: The Second Blindness, Olds, trans.

81. Sambahula-bhikkhu Suttaɱ, IV.50

A group of bhikkhus inquires as to how they should answer when questioned as to the point of the Buddha's teaching.
See the Discussion for more on this issue.

PTS: A Brother, IV.27
WP: A Number of Bhikkhus, II.1161
Discussion

82. Loka Suttaɱ, IV.52

A bhikkhu asks about the meaning of the term 'the world'.

PTS: The World, IV.28
WP: The World, II.1162
ATI: The World

83. Phagguna Suttaɱ, IV.52

Phagguna asks the Buddha if there are sense organs capable of perceiving the past Buddhas. He is told that there are not.
In other places the Buddha has taken advantage of similar questions to respond in the affirmative qualifying the answer by substituting the 'eye of dhamma' or 'the ear of dhamma' for the physical eye and ear. Here the form of Phagguna's question, by including all the senses and also by including all the past Buddhas, precludes this response. There are no physical senses capable of such perception, and the Buddha states that even he is unable to see back in time all the way to the beginning.

PTS: Phagguna, IV.28
WP: Phagguna, II.1162

IV. Channa Vagga, IV.53

84. Paloka-dhamma Suttaɱ, IV.53

Ananda asks about the extent of what is encompassed by the idea of 'the world'.
In this sutta and in #82 'world' is defined through the etymology of the term 'loka' to mean that which is broken apart or which disintegrates. The deeper meaning is that this word is to be understood to be a term for 'the all'. All that which has come to be is subject to breaking apart, disintegration; that is 'the world'.

PTS: Transitory, IV.28
WP: Subject to Disintegration, II.1163

85. Suñña Loka Suttaɱ, IV.54

Ananda asks about the extent of what is encompassed by the idea 'Empty is the World.'

PTS: Void, IV.29
WP: Empty Is the World, II.1163
ATI: Empty

86. Saŋkhitta-dhamma Suttaɱ, IV.54

Ananda asks for a teaching in brief. The Buddha gives him a walk to walk to begin the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'

PTS: In Brief, IV.29
WP: The Dhamma in Brief, II.1164

87. Channa Suttaɱ, IV.55

Sariputta and Maha Cunda visit Channa who is dying a painful death. Channa announces he will 'take the knife' (commit suicide). Sariputta questions him as to his understanding of Dhamma and Maha Cunda recites for him a saying of the Buddha warning against the wavering that results from attachments. Later, after Channa has 'taken the knife' Sariputta questions the Buddha as to Channa's fate. The Buddha states that his was a blameless end.

PTS: Channa, IV.30
WP: Channa, II.1164
Discussion

88. Puṇṇa Suttaɱ, IV.60

Punna, after being given an instruction 'in brief' by the Buddha, is questioned as to how he will deal with the fierce people of Sunaparanta where he intends to dwell. He gives a series of answers which shows he has the patience to deal with them even to the point of death.
For another translation of this sutta see MN 145 which is almost identical.

PTS: Puṇṇa, IV.34
WP: Puṇṇa,, II.1167
ATI: To Punna

89. Bāhiya Suttaɱ, IV.63

Bahiya asks for a teaching in brief and The Buddha gives him a walk to walk to begin the uprooting of thoughts about 'I am' and 'me.'

PTS: Bāhiya, IV.37
WP: Bāhiya, II.1169

90. Pathama Ejā Suttaɱ, IV.64

The Buddha presents a method for eliminating passion which he characterizes as a sickness, a boil a being pierced by an arrow.

PTS: Passion (i), IV.37
WP: Being Stirred 1, II.1170

91. Dutiya Eja Suttaɱ, IV.66

The Buddha presents a method for eliminating passion which he characterizes as a sickness, a boil a being pierced by an arrow.

PTS: Passion 2, IV.38
WP: Being Stirred 2, II.1171

92. Paṭhama Dvaya Suttaɱ, IV.67

The Buddha describes the ultimate duality and states that no one could reject this duality and point out another duality.

PTS: Duality (i), IV.
BD: The First Duality, Olds, trans.
WP: The Dyad, II.1171

93. Dutiya Dvaya Suttaɱ, IV.67

The Buddha explains that it is a consequence of the meeting of a sense organ and a sense object that sense-consciousness, sense-contact, sense-experience, feeling, and self-awareness appear and that each of these individual elements being changeable, the resulting consciousness is changeable.
A very important sutta that describes the self-arising of consciousness and self-awareness. 'Self' here not referring to an individuality, but to the arising of consciousness of itself of the process. Very useful in comprehending the idea of 'not-self'. My translation strives to more forcefully point to the lack of a 'person' or 'self' in the process.

PTS: Duality 2, IV.39
WP: The Dyad 2, II.1172
ATI: A Pair, Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.
BD: The Second Duality, Olds, trans.

V. Saḷa Vagga, IV.70

94. Cha-Phassāyatana (Saŋgayya (i)) Suttaɱ, IV.70

The Buddha teaches that united with the six spheres of touch is the experience of pain or pleasure in accordance with whether or not the senses have been tamed, trained and are well guarded or not.

PTS: Including (the sixfold sense-sphere), IV.40
BD: United with the Six Spheres of Touch, Olds, trans.
WP: Untamed, Unguarded, II.1173

95. Māluŋkyaputta (Dutiya Saŋgaya) Suttaɱ, IV.72

The Buddha gives Malankaya-Putta a teaching in brief which inspires him to attain arahantship.

PTS: Including 2, IV.42
WP: Malunkyaputta, II.1175
ATI: To Malunkyaputta, Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.

96. Parihānam Suttaɱ, IV.76

The Buddha describes a person as being of the nature to fall back if when he perceives a sense-object he is subject to and involved with the arising of unprofitable states; of a nature not to fall back if he rejects them when unprofitable states arise; and has found the six stations of matery when on the perception of a sense-object unprofitable states do not arise.

BD: The Six Relms of Mastery (Excerpt) Translation, discussion
Losing Your Grip, Olds, trans.,
PTS: Falling back, IV.45
WP: Decline, II.1178

97. Pamādavihārī Suttaɱ, IV.78

The Buddha defines living dangerously as living with the forces of the senses uncontrolled. Living carefully is defined as living with the sense-forces controlled.

PTS: Dwelling Heedless, IV.46
WP: Dwelling Negligently, II.1179
ATI: Dwelling in Heedlessness, Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Living Dangerously, Olds, trans.

98. Saɱvara Suttaɱ, IV.79

The Buddha describes restraint and lack of restraint in terms of whether or not one indulges and hangs on to the six senses.

PTS: Restraint, IV.47
WP: Restraint, II.1180

99. Samādhi Suttaɱ, IV.80

The Buddha urges the Bhikkhus to develop serenity (samādhi) in order to see things as they are.
Woodward footnotes here that the commentary here defines Samādhi as citt'ekaggatā = 'heart one-got,' most frequently translated 'one-pointed', but also occasionally 'unified' and the source of the translation 'concentration' for samādhi. I suggest 'single-minded' 'intent' on it's purpose, and that this is at most one of many attributes of and not the entire definition of samadhi for the meaning elsewhere encompasses the entire practice from generosity up to and including the jhānas and the accomplishment of pointlessness, signlessness and emptiness all of which conduce to seeing things as they are and dwelling above it all = serenity.

PTS: Concentration, IV.
WP: Concentration, II.1181
ATI: Concentration, Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.

100. Paṭisallāṇa Suttaɱ, IV.80

The Buddha urges the Bhikkhus to develop solitude in order to see things as they are.

PTS: Solitude, IV.48
WP: Seclusion, II.1181

101. Paṭhama Na Tumhāka Suttaɱ, IV.81

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to let go of experience through the senses. He compares their nature as not belonging to the self to the nature of the twigs and branches of the Jeta Grove.
Compare this sutta with SN 3.22.33.

PTS: Not Yours (i), IV.48
WP: Not Yours 1, II.1181
ATI: Not Yours

102. Dutiya Na Tumhāka Suttaɱ, IV.82

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to let go of experience through the senses as such does not belong to the self.

PTS: Not Yours (ii), IV.49
WP: Not Yours 2, II.1182

103. Uddaka Suttaɱ, IV.83

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the requirements for stating that one is knowledgable, has mastered the word, and dug out the root of pain.
This lesson is given by way of critiquing a statement of Gotama's former teacher Uddaka, Rama's Son who makes the claim that he is 'Versed in lore, all conqueror, has dug out the root of Dukkha, not dug out before.' Uddaka taught Dhamma only up to The Sphere of Neither-Perception-nor-Non-Perception which did not satisfy Gotama in that he saw that this sphere was 'sankara-ed' (intentionally constructed by the self for experience of the self) and therefore subject to change and ending.

PTS: Uddaka, IV.49
WP: Uddaka, II.1182

Third Fifty

I. Yogakkhemi Vagga, IV.85

104. Yogakkhemi Suttaɱ, IV.85

The Buddha provides a general rule for the attainment of freedom from yokes in general through yoking one's self to abandoning the realms of the senses.
The sutta uses puns and depends on understanding the terms 'yoga' and 'pariyaya'. 'Yoga' in it's literal meanings as 'yoke' (as the yoke of a beast of burden to it's burden') and figuratively as 'devotion' or 'application' to a task. 'Pariyaya' means 'pass-round-whatsoever-whatsoever'. Most frequently in the sense of curiculum, or course. But it also means 'in general.' 'everything whatever'. The idea is along the lines of 'abandonging desire through desire to abandon desire;' 'yoked to abandonging the senses one abandons the yokes of the senses.' Here the meaning is that this curiculum will serve in any case of being yoked; that this is the most general way of stating the way to attain freedom.

PTS: Winner of Security, IV.51
WP: Secure from Bondage, II.1184

105. Upādāya Suttaɱ, IV.85

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that it is the senses that support personal pain and pleasure, and that seeing that the senses are impermanent and that impermanence is painful and letting go of taking delight in sense-experience leads to freedom and the end of rebirth.
This sutta has many parallels with suttas in the Khandhā book, e.g. SN 3.22.49, SN 3.22.79, SN 3.22.85, SN 3.22.100 ...

PTS: Dependent, IV.51
WP: By Clinging, II.1184

106. Dukkha-Samudaya Suttaɱ, IV.86

The Buddha describes the way pain emerges and how, by ending thirst, the sequence is broken and freedom attained.
This sutta uses the Paticca Samuppada methodology to focus down on the sense spheres.

PTS: Ill, IV.52
WP: The Origin of Suffering, Included by reference only: (Identical with 12:43.) II.1185

107. Loka-Samudaya Suttaɱ, IV.87

The Buddha defines the world and the ending of the world in terms of thirst for sense experience.

PTS: The World, IV.53
WP: The Origin of the World, Included by reference only: (Identical with 12:44.) II.1185

108. Seyya Suttaɱ, IV.88

The Buddha points out that where the senses are seen as inconstant and painful the idea that the self is better or worse or equal to any other does not find any basis.
This is a variation on SN 4.35.105. This is the advantage of these series of suttas which are similar in most respects but change in one respect: they hammer away at one aspect of the Dhamma from all sides. It is very easy to think that when one has penetrated through to one view of, say, the senses according to Dhamma, one has completely understood this Dhamma. With these suttas one can be sure. They scour off every contaminant. Here in order to understand how seeing that the senses are changeable and painful eliminates judgments of superiority and inferiority, one must first grasp the idea (which is not stated overtly, you have to work at it) that the senses, being changeable and painful cannot rightly be considered 'self'. Without 'self' there is no evaluation of 'self' and 'other'. Think of these suttas as a soft cloth that is polishing, polishing, polishing away everything that is obstructing your vision. Every one of them is worth a little elbow grease.

PTS: Better, IV.54
WP: I Am Superior, II.1185

109. Saŋyojana Suttaɱ, IV.89

The Buddha defines the yokes to rebirth (sanyojana) distinguishing between the object (the senses) and the yoke itself which is desire and lust.
A very important distinction to get through your head! See also for this idea: SN 3.22.120. It is not the fault of the fairest lass in the land, carelessly dressed, revealing her charms, laughing and singing and dancing, (no matter how much she is trying to make it so), that lust arises in one's heart. It is one's own deficiency of knowledge, perception, vision and self control.

PTS: Fetter, IV.55
WP: Things That Fetter, II.1186

110. Upādāna Suttaɱ, IV.89

The Buddha defines that which supports life distinguishing between the thing (the senses) that supports and the supporting which is desire and lust.
See also for this idea: SN 3.22.121.
Because of the distinction made here between the fuel and the thing that makes the fuel fuel living, or between that which supports life and that which makes those supports support life, these are two (four) very good suttas to use to batter out your personal um...grasp/understanding/translation of 'upādāna'. Grasping works. 'The eye is the thing grasped, the lust is the grasping." Bhk. Bodhi: 'The eye is a thing that can be clung to, the desire and lust for it is the clinging there.' But I don't think the idea is 'clinging' either in regard to the khandhas or in its place in the Paticca Samuppada. This word must stand for 'going after or supporting or fueling getting' or 'going towards, supporting, fueling making' not trying to keep, hang on to, what has already been got.

PTS: Grasping, IV.55
WP: Things That Can Be Clung To, II.1186

111. Paṭhama Parijānana Suttaɱ, IV.89

The Buddha states flat out that without understanding, without thoroughly knowing about, without becoming dispassionate towards, and without letting go of the six spheres of sense one is incapable of attaining the end of pain (dukkha). You be told!

PTS: Understanding (i), IV.55
WP: Fully Understanding, II.1186

112. Dutiya Parijānana Suttaɱ, IV.90

The Buddha states flat out that without understanding, without thoroughly knowing about, without becoming dispassionate towards, and without letting go of the six objects of the senses one is incapable of attaining the end of pain (dukkha).

PTS: Understanding (ii), IV.55
WP: Fully Understanding 2, Included by reference only: (Identical with Ī111, but stated by way of the six external sense bases.) II.1187

113. Upassuti Suttaɱ, IV.90

The Buddha exhorts a bhikkhu who has overheard him rehearsing it to himself to remember a version of the chain of self-generating consequences (the Paticca Samuppada) based on the six sense spheres.

PTS: Overhearing, IV.55
WP: Listening In, Included by reference only: (Identical with 12:45.) II.1187

II. Lokakāmaguṇa Vagga, IV.

114. Paṭhama Māra-Pāsa Suttaɱ, IV.91

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that indulging in the pleasures of the senses one is known as someone inhabiting the house of the Evil One, under the influence of the Evil One, trapped by the Evil One's noose, bound by the Evil One, subject to the pleasure of the Evil One.

PTS: Māra's Noose (i), IV.56
WP: Māra's Snare 1, II.1187

115. Dutiya Mārapāsa Suttaɱ, IV.92

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that indulging in the pleasures of the senses one is known as someone in bondage to sensory objects perceived by the sense organs, one inhabiting the house of the Evil One, under the influence of the Evil One, trapped by the Evil One's noose, bound by the Evil One, subject to the pleasure of the Evil One.

PTS: Mara's Noose (ii), IV.57
WP: Māra's Snare 2, II.1188
ATI: Mara's Power

116. Paṭhama Loka-Kāma-Guṇa Suttaɱ, IV.93

The Buddha states that the end of the world is not to be reached by finding the end of the world but also that the end of pain cannot be reached without finding the end of the world. The bhikkhus question Ananda about this teaching in brief and Ananda explains that the meaning is that in the Buddha's system the world is to be understood as experiencing through the senses. The Buddha confirms Ananda's explanation.
This sutta is abridged by way of a statement that such and such was repeated precisely as it occurred. I have unabridged the Woodward translation accordingly but left the Pali as abridged.
This is an important sutta because of the definition of 'the world' as it is to be understood in the Buddhas's system.

PTS: Worldly Sense-Pleasures (i), IV.57
WP: Going to the End of the World, II.1188

117. Dutiya Loka-Kāma-Guṇa Suttaɱ, IV.97

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to be careful even concerning sense impressions that have passed in that memories of such are still capable of of influencing the mind.
The Pali and the Woodward translation have been unabridged in accordance with the indications in the texts and in accordance with their own logic. However it is highly likely that there is an error in the Pali and that it has resulted in confusion and mistranslation all round (including that of Bhk. Bodhi who has made the best sense of it as it is.) What has been done in the Olds version is not a translation. It should be thought of as a convenient way to explain what is suggested as the correct way the sutta should have been edited. It has just been patched together using Woodward's translation, that of Bhk. Bodhi and some original translation.

PTS: Worldly sensual elements 2, IV.60
BD: The Cords of Worldly Sense Pleasures, Olds, trans.
WP: Cords of Sensual Pleasure, II.1190

118. Sakka-Pañha Suttaɱ, IV.101

Sakka, king of the devas, asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.
The introduction here of Sakka, a deva, the king of the devas, is so casual as to defeat any argument that it was so introduced by the editors to puff up Gotama's image. If that had been the intention the mind set of such would have dictated an array of fabulous circumstances to highlight the occasion. Here Sakka just has a simple question, gets a simple answer and that's the end of it. I would feel much safer, even were I one who disbelieved in devas, saying that it is I that cannot see devas rather than saying that devas do not exist. The latter statement would require of me a vision more astounding than that which would be required to see a deva.

PTS: Sakka, IV.61
WP: Sakka's Question, II.1192

119. Pañca-sikha-Pañha Suttaɱ, IV.103

The Deva Five-crest, asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.

PTS: Five-crest, IV.62
WP: Pancasikha, Included by reference only: (The same as Ī118 except that the interlocutor is Pañca-sikha, son of the gandhabbas.) II.1192

120. Sāriputta-Saddhi-Vihārika Suttaɱ, IV.103

Sariputta teaches a bhikkhu about guarding the sense, moderation in eating and keeping the wakeful watch.

PTS: Sariputta, IV.63
WP: Sāriputta, II.1193

121. Rāhulo-Vāda Suttaɱ, IV.105

Perceiving that Rahula, the Buddha's son, is ripe for Arahantship, the Buddha teaches him how to see the senses as not self and to let them go.
The story of the Buddha's son from birth to Arahantship is another of the background stories that one can pieces together when the the entire sutta collection is read. Here we see the teaching that brought him to Arahantship. (see: SN: Rahula Samyutta iii, SN 3.22.91, SN 3.22.92, AN 1.209 Personalities: Rahula.) This teaching is one that has appeared several times in this Chapter, but has a twist at the end of each section that deals with the senses. The BJT Pali has copied and pasted the text from another sutta but has neglected to make the change in the end sections. In stead of ending with the question as to the permanence or impermanence of the sensations that arise consequent on sense-contact, it ends with a question as to the impermanence or permanence of sensation, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Rāhula, IV.64
WP: Exhortation to Rāhula, II.1194

122. Saŋyojana Suttaɱ, IV.107

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the distinction between that which yokes one to rebirth and that to which one is yoked.
A variation of SN 4.35.109, SN 3.22.120, SN 3.22.121.

PTS: Fetter, IV.66
WP: Things That Fetter, Included by reference only: (Identical with Ī109, but by way of the six external sense bases.) II.1196

123. Upādāna Suttaɱ, IV.108

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the distinction between that which supports rebirth and that which is the act of supporting.

PTS: Grasping, IV.66
WP: Things That Can Be Clung To, Included by reference only: (Identical with Ī110, but by way of the six external sense bases.) II.1196

III. Gahapati Vagga, IV.109

124. Vesālī Suttaɱ, IV.109

Ugga (Hugo), the householder, of Vesali, asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.

PTS: Vesālī, IV.66
WP: At Vesālī, II.1196

125. Vajji Suttaɱ, IV.109

Ugga (Hugo), the householder, of Hatthigama, asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.

PTS: Vajjians, IV.67
WP: Among the Vajjians. Abridged as follows: "On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Vajjians at Hatthigāma. Then the householder Ugga of Hatthigāma approached the Blessed One ... and said to him. ... (As in Ī118.)" II.1197

126. Nālandā Suttaɱ, IV.110

Upali, the householder, asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.

PTS: Nālanda, IV.67
WP: At Nālandā. Abridged as follows: "On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Nālandā in Pāvārika's Mango Grove. Then the householder Upāli approached the Blessed One ... and said to him. ... (As in Ī118.)" II.1197

127. Bhāradvāja Suttaɱ, IV.110

Udena, the king of the Vangsas, questions the venerable Bharadvaja as to why respectable young men of family would renounce the world and live their entire lives as beggars in the Dhamma taught by Gotama. Bharadvaja provides him with several answers the last of which satisfies the king who then becomes a lay follower.

PTS: Bhāradvāja, IV.
WP: Bhāradvāja, II.1197
ATI: About Bharadvaja
Discussion

128. Soṇa Suttaɱ, IV.113

Sona, the householder, asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.

PTS: Soṇa, IV.70
WP: Sona. Abridged as follows: "On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling at Rājagaha in the Bamboo Grove, the Squirrel Sanctuary. Then the householder's son Soṇa approached the Blessed One ... and said to him. ... (As in Ī118.)" II.1199

129. Ghosita Suttaɱ, IV.113

Ghosita the householder asks Ananda about the Buddha's understanding of the diversity of informative data.
Note that here the object of sense productive of sensation that is not-painful-but-not-pleasant is 'upekkhā-ṭṭhāniyā': 'a detached-state.' (a state of detachment from sense-consciousness.) PED has, under 'upekkha': "Sometimes equivalent to adukkham-asukha-vedanā "feeling which is neither pain nor pleasure," but here it is not the equivalant, but the source. To say that it is the equivalent is the equivalant of saying that pleasant sensation arising from consciousness of a pleasant visual object is the same thing as the visual object. Adukkha-m-asukha-vedanā is 'neither/nor' but would be better stated per the literal 'not this-but-not that'. 'Neither/nor' has the subtle implication that there is a third thing there that is this neither/nor, and that is the basis of the absolutely incorrect and frequently used 'neutral'.

PTS: Ghosita, IV.71
WP: Ghosita, II.1199

130. Hāliddaka Suttaɱ, IV.115

Haliddaka the householder asks Maha Kaccana about the diversity of informative data.

PTS: Hāliddaka, IV.72
WP: Hāliddakāni, II.1200

131. Nakulapitā Suttaɱ, IV.116

Nakulapita asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.

PTS: Nakulapitar, IV.73
WP: Nakulapita. Abridged as follows: On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Bhaggas at Suɱsu Māragira in the Bhesakaḷā Grove, the Deer Park. Then the householder Nakulapitā approached the Blessed One ... and said to him. ... (As in Ī118.)" II.1201

132. Lohicca Suttaɱ, IV.116

Maha Kaccana teaches a brahmin the meaning of guarding the senses.

PTS: Lohicca, IV.73
WP: Lohicca, II.1201

133. Verahaccāni Suttaɱ, IV.121

The Elder Udayin teaches by example the respect that should be paid to the Dhamma and Dhamma teachers. He then teaches the different situations where the Arahant will or will not point out pleasure and pain.

BD: Respect the Respect-worthy
Respect the Dhamma Worthy of Respect Discussion.
PTS: Verahaccāni, IV.77
WP: Verahaccāni,, II.1204

IV. Devadaha Vagga, IV.124

134. Devadahakhaṇa Suttaɱ, IV.124

The Buddha makes a distinction between the seeker and the Arahant with regard to being careful about guarding the senses.

PTS: The Moment at Devadaha, IV.80
WP: At Devadaha, II.1206

135. Khaṇa (aka Saŋgayha) Suttaɱ, IV.135

The Buddha delivers a real fire-and-brimstone sutta urging the bhikkhus to take advantage of the lucky fact that they have been reborn when Dhamma was being taught and make strong effort.

BD: I have seen the hells Discussion
PTS: Including (the sixfold sense-sphere), IV.81
WP: The Opportunity, II.1207
ATI: The Opportunity Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

136. Rūpāpārāma Suttaɱ, (PTS: Agayha; BJT: Sagayha + Gayha; CSCD: Paṭhama Rūpāpārāma + Dutiya ~) IV.126

Bhikkhu Bodhi notes: "Feer wrongly entitles this sutta Agaytha, and runs it together with the next (beginning at IV 128,8)." The sutta numbering system of the BJT and CSCD Pali and the Bhk. Bodhi translation diverges from the PTS at this sutta which they have divided into two suttas. There are reasonable arguments for either side of the issue. I here follow the PTS numbering.

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that it is because of the instability of the objects of the senses that gods and men come to grief, but that the Arahant actually finds this instability his source of living at ease.
The sutta is especially interesting for the statement that it is the instability of sense objects that is the basis of ease for the Arahant. I don't believe this statement is made elsewhere in the suttas. How should this be understood? I would suggest that it is because the Arahant is free from the grief caused by this instability that perception of it is a reminder of what has been escaped. This is another way of stating that the consciousness of the Arahant is fed by perception of freedom; a statement that is made in several places throughout the suttas. See: Is Nibbana Conditioned? for more on this subject.

PTS: Not Including (the sixfold sense-sphere), IV.81
WP: 136: Delight in Forms 1, II.1208
137: Delight in Forms 2, Abridged as follows: (Identical with the preceding sutta, but without the verses.) II.1209

137. Paṭhama Palāsinā Suttaɱ, IV.128

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to let go of experience through the senses. He compares their nature as not belonging to the self to the nature of the twigs and branches of the Jeta Grove.
Compare this sutta with SN 3.22.33. and SN 4.35.101.

PTS: Leaves, IV.83
WP: 138 Not Yours 1, II.1210

138. Dutiya Palāsinā Suttaɱ, IV.129

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to let go of the objects of the senses. He compares their nature as not belonging to the self to the nature of the twigs and branches of the Jeta Grove.
This and the previous sutta are without nidanas. In context they should have been located in Devadaha, but the simile in each references 'this Jeta Grove' which is in Savatthi. I have used Savatthi, but there is room for doubt.

PTS: Leaves 2, IV.84
WP: 139 Not Yours 2, Abridged as follows: (Identical with the preceding sutta, but stated by way of the six external bases.) II.1210

139. Paṭhama Ajjhatta-Anicca aka Hetunā Ajjhatta Suttaɱ, IV.129

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the sense organs, however they originated, are a product of the impermanent and as a consequence are themselves impermant. Then he instructs them that when this is seen as it is, one lets go one's taste for experience through the senses.

PTS: The Personal, by Way of Condition (i), IV.84
WP: 140 Impermanent with Cause (Internal), II.1210

140. Dutiya Ajjhatta-Dukkha aka Hetunā Ajjhatta Suttaɱ, IV.130

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the sense organs, however they originated, are a product of suffering and as a consequence are themselves of the nature of suffering. Then he instructs them that when this is seen as it is, one lets go one's taste for experience through the senses.

PTS: The Personal, by Way of Condition (ii), IV.84
WP: 141 Suffering with Cause (Internal), II.1211

141. Tatiya Ajjhatta-Anatta aka Hetunā Ajjhatta Suttaɱ, IV.130

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the sense organs, however they originated, are a result of what is not the self and as a conseqence are themselves not of the nature of self. Then he instructs them that when this is seen as it is, one lets go one's taste for experience through the senses.

PTS: The Personal, by Way of Condition (iii), IV.84
WP: 142 Nonself with Cause (Internal), II.1211

142. Paṭhama Bāhira-Anicca aka Hetunā Bāhira Suttaɱ, IV.131

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the sense objects, however they originated, are a result of what is not the self and as a conseqence are themselves not of the nature of self. Then he instructs them that when this is seen as it is, one lets go one's taste for experience through the senses.

PTS: The External, by Way of Condition 1, IV.84
WP: 143-145 Impermenent with Cause, Etc. (External), II.1211

143. Dutiya Bāhira-Dukkha aka Hetunā Bāhira Suttaɱ, IV.131

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the sense objects, however they originated, are a result of what is not the self and as a conseqence are themselves not of the nature of self. Then he instructs them that when this is seen as it is, one lets go one's taste for experience through the senses.

PTS: The External, by Way of Condition 2, IV.84

144. Tatiya Bāhira-Anatta aka Hetunā Bāhira Suttaɱ, IV.131

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that the sense objects, however they originated, are a result of what is not the self and as a conseqence are themselves not of the nature of self. Then he instructs them that when this is seen as it is, one lets go one's taste for experience through the senses.
The previous six making up the famous '3 characteristics'. Note that the implication is that by thorough understanding of any one of them the whole lot is understood and arahantship is attainable.

PTS: The External, by Way of Condition 3, IV.84

V. Navapurāṇa Vagga, IV.132

145. Kamma Suttaɱ, IV.132

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about old kamma, new kamma and the way to end kamma.
The important thing here is to grasp the idea of kamma as both the product of action and the action which brought about that product. This is not the same thing as our 'action' and 'result' as conceived of as discrete events in Time as reflected in our English construction 'subject, verb, object' — the one term stands for both. Understanding this will help clarify the understanding of 'saŋkhāra' which is also the doing and the product in one term. Having grasped this way of seeing the world as flow of consciousness through a series of apparently (apparently only) static events consisting of action and consequence as a single unit, it will become clear why, as in this sutta, the Buddha felt it necessary to define what, precisely it is that is profitably considered the past and what the present, that is, that that part of the event which consists of the eye and objects should be thought of as the past; that part of it that is the action of doing should be considered to be the present. (The usual perception is that action occurs now and consequences follow later in time; but that perception is a consequence of being 'in-volved' in the world. Outside, apart from involvement, the perception is different than that. It is, in fact, perception of action as 'the present' and consequences as 'the future' that binds you to Time and identification with the 'actor'. It is the Buddha's description of this construction that is, in fact, the key to unlocking the door to this higher perception.) Then the lesson is completed by pointing out the way to stop the flow by following the Magga.

PTS: Action, IV.85
WP: 146 Kamma, II.1211
ATI: Action BD: Deeds, Olds, trans.

146. Paṭhama Sappāya Suttaɱ, IV.133

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that a helpful tool in the effort to attain Nibbana is to regard the sense organs, the sense objects, sense-consciousness, contact with the senses, and the sensations that result from contact with the senses all as impermanent.

PTS: Helpful (i), IV.86
WP: 147 Suitable for Attaining Nibbana 1, II.1212

147. Dutiya Sappāya Suttaɱ, IV.134

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that a helpful tool in the effort to attain Nibbana is to regard the sense organs, the sense objects, sense-consciousness, contact with the senses, and the sensations that result from contact with the senses all as painful.

PTS: Helpful (ii), IV.86
WP: 148-149 Suitable for Attaining Nibbana 2-3, II.1212

148. Tatiya Sappāya Suttaɱ, IV.134

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that a helpful tool in the effort to attain Nibbana is to regard the sense organs, the sense objects, sense-consciousness, contact with the senses, and the sensations that result from contact with the senses all as not-self.

PTS: Helpful (iii), IV.86

149. Catuttha Sappāya Suttaɱ, IV.135

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that a helpful tool in the effort to attain Nibbana is to regard the sense organs, the sense objects, sense-consciousness, contact with the senses, and the sensations that result from contact with the senses all as impermanent, painful and not self and so regarding them, to let them go.

PTS: Helpful (iv), IV.86
WP: 150 Suitable for Attaining Nibbana 4, II.1213

150. Antevāsika Suttaɱ, IV.136

The Buddha likens allowing unprofitable states to arise from sensory perception to having a resident student and being under the power of a teacher, for these states dwell within and boss him around.

PTS: Resident Pupil, IV.86
WP: 151 A Student, II.1213

151. Kim Atthiya Suttaɱ, IV.138

The Buddha explains to the bhikkhus how they should respond to questions about why one leads the bhikkhu's life under him.

PTS: To What Purpose?, IV.87
WP: 152 For What Purpose the Holy Life?, II.1214

152. Atthi Nu Kho Pariyāyo Suttaɱ, IV.138

The Buddha describes the manner in which knowledge can be had (right up to knowledge of arahantship) without resort to faith, inclination, hearsay, methodological deduction, reflection on reasons or approval of a speculative theory.
A really valuable sutta for clarifying the idea that this Dhamma is one which is to be 'seen for one's self in this visible state'.

PTS: Is There A Method?, IV.88
WP: 153 Is There a Method?, II.1214

153. Indriya-Sampanna Suttaɱ, IV.140

The Buddha explains what it means to have brought the forces to perfection, or to say that someone has brought their forces to perfection.
'Indriya' is almost always (other than in my translations) translated 'faculties,' meaning the sense- or other faculties. The word is intended, in that it is derived from Indra, a god of war, to imply 'force', as in 'May the force be with you!' and the 'sense faculties' were viewed as forces (powers when put to use, forces in and of themselves).

PTS: Faculty, IV.89
ATI: Faculties, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: 154 Equipped with Faculties, II.1216

154. Dhamma-Kathika Suttaɱ, IV.141

The Buddha tells a bhikkhu what is to be understood by the terms 'Dhamma teaching bhikkhu', 'an In Form-according-to-Dhamma bhikkhu,' and 'a Nibbana-in-this-seen-thing-winning bhikkhu.'
'dhamma-kathiko bhikkhū,''dhammānudhamma-paṭipanno bhikkhū,' 'diṭṭha-dhamma-nibbānappatto bhikkhū.'

PTS: Preacher, IV.89
WP: 155 A Speaker on the Dhamma, II.1216

IV. Fourth Fifty

I. Nandikkhaya Vagga, IV.142

155. Ajjhatta Nandikkhaya Suttaɱ, IV.142

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that at the point where the instability of personal sense experience is seen as unstable the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses has been reached and with the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses the lust for sense pleasure has been destroyed. With the destruction of taking enjoyment in lust the heart is freed.
The BJT Pali, for some reason, has mistakenly substituted 'Dukkha' for 'Anicca' throughout this sutta.
I have done a translation of this sutta because for a long time the translation of 'nandi' as 'delight' has bothered me in that the real idea is not the experience of delight or enjoyment, but the 'taking' or 'finding' of delight or enjoyment in, that is, really, the seeking out of, the indulgence in delight or enjoyment. Also in this translation is a new suggested translation for 'anicca' as 'unreliable.' Another translation that occurs to me now is 'flighty.' Another is 'fleeting.' Both of these, however, lack an easy oposite form constructed from the same root.

PTS: The Destruction of the Lure (i), IV.91
WP: 156 The Destruction of Delight, II.1217
BD: The Destruction of Taking Enjoyment in the Internal, Olds, trans.

156. Bāhirana Nandikkhaya Suttaɱ, IV.142

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that at the point where the instability of experience of the external is seen as unstable the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses has been reached and with the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses the lust for sense pleasure has been destroyed. With the destruction of taking enjoyment in lust the heart is freed.

 


"Whenever, beggars, a beggar sees the unreliable eye as unreliable,
he has achieved consummate view.

With seeing consummately comes satiation.

In the destruction of taking enjoyment,
the destruction of lust
in the destruction of lust,
the destruction of taking enjoyment.

With the destruction of taking enjoyment in lust,
the heart is called
'Well-freed'.


 

PTS: The Destruction of the Lure (ii), IV.91
WP: 157 The Destruction of Delight, II.1217
BD: The Destruction of Taking Enjoyment in the External, Olds, trans.

157. Ajjhattana-Nandikkhaya-Yoniso Suttaɱ, IV.142

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to study the point where the instability of experience of the internal sense organs is seen as unstable. So seeing, the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses has been reached and with the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses the lust for sense pleasure has been destroyed. With the destruction of taking enjoyment in lust the heart is freed.

PTS: The Destruction of the Lure (iii), IV.91
WP: 158 The Destruction of Delight, II.1218

158. Bahira-Nandikkhaya-Yoniso Suttaɱ, IV.143

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to study the point where the instability of external sense objects is seen as unstable. So seeing, the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses has been reached and with the destruction of the motivation to take enjoyment in the senses the lust for sense pleasure has been destroyed. With the destruction of taking enjoyment in lust the heart is freed.

PTS: The Destruction of the Lure (iv), IV.91
WP: 159 The Destruction of Delight, II.1218

159. Jīvakambavane aka Samādhi Suttaɱ, IV.143

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to practice serenity to see sense experience as it really is as unstable.

PTS: In Jīvaka's Mango Grove (i), IV.91
WP: 160 Jivaka's Mango Grove, II.1218

160. Jīvakambavane aka Paṭisallāna Suttaɱ, IV.143

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to devote themselves to solitude to see sense experience as it really is as unstable.

PTS: Jīvaka's Mango Grove (ii), IV.92
WP: 161 Jivaka's Mango Grove 2, II.1219

161. Koṭṭhita Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.145

Kotthika asks for a teaching in brief and the Buddha tells him to put away desire for the impermanent which he defines as the six sense realms.

PTS: Koṭṭhika (i), IV.92
WP: 162 Kotthita, II.1219
BD: Kotthika

162. Koṭṭhita Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.146

Kotthika asks for a teaching in brief and the Buddha tells him to put away desire for the painful which he defines as the six sense realms.

PTS: Koṭṭhita (ii), IV.93
WP: 163 Kotthita 2, II.1219

163. Koṭṭhita Anatta Suttaɱ, IV.146

Kotthika asks for a teaching in brief and the Buddha tells him to put away desire for what is not the self which he defines as the six sense realms.

PTS: Koṭṭhita (iii), IV.93
WP: 164 Kotthita 3, II.1219

164. Micchā-Diṭṭhi Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.147

The Buddha teaches that the way to eliminate misguided view is to see sense-experiences as impermanent.

PTS: Wrong View, IV.93
WP: 165 Abandoning Wrong View, II.1220

165. Sakkāya-Diṭṭhi Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.147

The Buddha teaches that the way to eliminate views as to own-body is to see sense-experiences as impermanent.

PTS: The Person-Pack, IV.93
WP: 166 Abandoning Identity View, II.1220

166. Attanu-Diṭṭhi Pahāna Suttaɱ, IV.148

The Buddha teaches that the way to eliminate views as to self is to see sense-experiences as impermanent.

PTS: About the Self, IV.93
WP: 167 Abandoning the View of Self, II.1220

II. Saṭṭhi-Peyyālam Vagga, IV.148

In the following section Bhikkhu Bodhi has taken each of what Feer and Woodward have as multi-part suttas and has made the parts into individual suttas. The WP sutta numbers are given in the citation.

Covering suttas 167-186. A summary by way of a wheel sutta matching desire, lust, and desire and lust by way of instability, pain and not self, by way of the internal sense organs and the external sense objects, by way of the past, future and present.

167. Anicca-Chanda Suttaɱ, 1-3 IV.148

PTS: By Way of Desire (i-iii), IV.93
WP 168-170: Desire for the Impermanent (Internal), II.1120

168. Dukkha-Chanda Suttaɱ 4-6, IV.149

PTS: By Way of Desire (iv-vi), IV.94
WP 171-173: Desire for Suffering (Internal), Etc, II.1221

169. Anatta-Chanda Suttaɱ 7-9, IV.150

PTS: By Way of Desire (vii-ix), IV.94
WP 174-176: Desire for Nonself (Internal), Etc., II.1221

170. Anicca-Chanda Suttaɱ, 10-12 IV.150

PTS: By Way of Desire (x-xii), IV.94
WP 177-179: Desire for the Impermenent (External), Etc., II.1221

171. Dukkha-Chanda Suttaɱ, 13-15 IV.150

PTS: By Way of Desire (xii-xv), IV.94
WP 180-182: Desire for Suffering (External), Etc., II.1222

172. Anatta-Chanda Suttaɱ, 16-18 IV.151

PTS: By Way of Desire (xvi-xviii), IV.94
WP 183-185: Desire for Nonself (External), Etc., II.1222

173. Atītena Suttaɱ, 1-3, IV.151

PTS: By Way of the Past 1-3, IV.94
WP 186-188: The Past as Impermanent (Internal), II.1222

174. Atītena Suttaɱ, 4-6, IV.151

PTS: By Way of the Past 4-6, IV.95
WP 189-191: The Past, Etc., As Suffering (Internal), II.1223

175. Atītena Suttaɱ, 7-9, IV.151

PTS: By Way of the Past 7-9, IV.95
WP 192-194: The Past, Etc., as Nonself (Internal), II.1223

176. Atītena Suttaɱ, 10-12, IV.151

PTS: By Way of the Past 10-12, IV.95
WP 195-197: The Past, Etc., as Impermanent (External), II.1223

177. Atītena Suttaɱ, 13-15, IV.151

PTS: By Way of the Past 13-15, IV.95
WP 198-200: The Past, Etc., as Suffering (External), II.1223

178. Atītena Suttaɱ, 16-18, IV.151

PTS: By Way of the Past 16-18, IV.95
WP 201-203: The Past, Etc., as Nonself (External), II.1223

179. Yad anicca Suttaɱ, 1-3, IV.152

PTS: What is Impermanent 1-3, IV.95
WP 204-206: What Is Impermanent of the Past (Future, Present) (Internal), II.1223

180. Yad anicca Suttaɱ, 4-6, IV.154

PTS: What is Impermanent 4-6, IV.96
WP 207-209: What Is Suffering of the Past, Etc. (Internal), II.1224

181. Yad anicca Suttaɱ, 7-9, IV.154

PTS: What is Impermanent 7-9, IV.96
WP 210-212: What Is Nonself of the Past, Etc. (Internal), II.1224

182. Yad anicca Suttaɱ, 10-12, IV.154

PTS: What is Impermanent 10-12, IV.96
WP 213-215: What Is Impermanent of the Past, Etc. (External), II.1224

183. Yad anicca Suttaɱ, 13-15, IV.155

PTS: What is Impermanent 13-15, IV.96
WP 216-218: What Is Suffering of the Past, Etc. (External), II.1225

184. Yad anicca Suttaɱ, 16-18, IV.155

PTS: What is Impermanent 16-18, IV.96
WP 219-221: What is Nonself of the Past, Etc. (External), II.1225

185. Ajjhatta Suttaɱ, 1-3, IV.155

PTS: The Personal 1-3,, IV.96
WP 222-224: The Bases as Impermanent (Suffering Nonself) (Internal), II.1225

186. Bahira Suttaɱ, 1-3, IV.156

PTS: The External 1-3, IV.96
WP 225-227: The Bases as Impermanent (Suffering Nonself) (External), II.1226

III. Samudda Vagga, IV.157

187. Paṭhama Samudda Suttaɱ, IV.157

The Buddha likens sense experience to the ocean with the sense objects being the source of it's turbulance. He who can transcend the turbulance is called free.

PTS: Ocean (i), IV.97
WP: 228 The Ocean 1, II.1226

188. Dutiya Samuddo Suttaɱ, IV.157

The Buddha likens sense experience to the ocean in which the world, for the most part is drowned, tangled up and bound down. He who can get rid of lust, anger and blindness has transcended this ocean with it's great dangers.

PTS: Ocean 2, IV.98
WP 229: The Ocean 2, II.1227

189. Bāḷisikopama Suttaɱ IV.158

The Buddha likens indulgence in sense experience to a fish being hooked by a fisherman's bait.

PTS: The Fisherman, IV.99
WP 230: The Fisherman Simile, II.1228
ATI: The Fisherman Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

190. Khīra-Rukkhopama Suttaɱ, IV.

The Buddha likens lust, hate and blindness to sap flowing from a cut in a sappy tree. In such a one even insignificant contact with sense objects overwhelms the heart, he has no hope when he comes into contact with powerful sense objects.

PTS: The Sap-Tree, IV.99
WP 231: The Milk-Sap Tree, II.1228

191. Koṭṭhika Suttaɱ, IV.162

Sariputta teaches Maha Kotthika the Buddha's doctrine that the sense organs are not bound to the sense objects nor are the sense objects bound to the sense organs, but desire binds the two together.
An extremely important bit of information! It is because of the bond between sense organ and sense object created by desire that there arises the impression in mind that there is an individual there perceiving a world through the senses.

BD: Kotthika, Olds, trans.
PTS: Kotthika, IV.101
WP 232: Kotthita, Bhk. Bodhi, trans. II.1230
ATI: To Kotthita, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

192. Kāmabhū Suttaɱ, IV.165

Ananda teaches Kamabhu the Buddha's doctrine that the sense organs are not bound to the sense objects nor are the sense objects bound to the sense organs, but desire binds the two together.

PTS: Kāmabhū, IV.102
WP 233: Kāmabhū, II.1231

193. Udāyī Suttaɱ, IV.166

Ananda explains how to view sense-consciousness as not-self.

BD: Udayi, olds trans.
PTS: Udayin, IV.102
WP 234: Udayi, II.1232
ATI: With Udayin Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

194. Āditta-Pariyāya Suttaɱ, IV.168

The Buddha delivers a real old-time fire and brimstone sermon on the dangers associated with the senses.
I did my translation because Woodward conveys by his translation the idea that searing the eye, etc. with red-hot implements would be a good thing in general whereas the idea is that relative to the dangers of desire and lust wrapped up in sense experience it would be better to sear ... . Some zealidiot in times to come will be saying that we should all go around injuring our sense organs, or worse, that the Buddha said that we should all do so. It seems to me that the Buddha has changed his style here. It happens here and there. The syntax is unusual. Woodward speculates that this sutta may have been spoken with Devadatta in mind.

PTS: On Fire, IV.104
BD: A Fire-and-Brimstone Sermon, Olds, trans.
WP 235: The Exposition on Burning, II.1233

195. Paṭhama Hatthapādupamā Suttaɱ, IV.171

The Buddha points out that without hands and feet, limbs and belly there would not be seen those activities that lead to personal pleasure and pain.

PTS: The Simile of Hand and Foot 1, IV.107
WP 236: The Simile of Hands and Feet, II.1236

196. Dutiya Hatthapādupamā Suttaɱ, IV.172

The Buddha points out that without hands and feet, limbs and belly there would not be seen those activities that lead to personal pleasure and pain.
This sutta is identical in every way to the previous. This sometimes happens, but is very unusual. It is more likely that this was originally the start of a second sutta which would have somehow pointed to the external.
I do not see how either of these amount to similes (Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi). Upamā (f.) [f. of upama in abstract meaning] likeness, simile, parable, example... > Upama (adj.) [compar.-superl. formation from upa, cp. Latin summus from *(s)ub-mo] "coming quite or nearly up to", i. e. like, similar, equal. But here? > Upameti [upa + mā] to measure one thing by another, to compare.

PTS: The simile of hand and foot 2, IV.107
WP 237: The Simile of Hands and Feet 2, II.1236

IV. Āsīvisa Vagga, IV.172

[The PTS text and translation both erroneously number this as Chapter 5.]

 

197. Āsīvisopama Suttaɱ, IV.172

The Buddha makes and explains similes for the four great characteristics, the five fuel stockpiles, desire, the six sense organs, the six sense objects, the corrupting influences, the eightfold path, Nibbana and the Arahant.
A really rich and illuminating sutta. Includes the simile of the raft (the eight-fold Way). The similes are immensely helpful for both practitioner and translator. For the practitioner for gaining perspective on the concepts illustrated and for the translator who should always strive to make his translation seamlessly fit the simile.

PTS: The Snake, IV.107
WP 238: The Simile of the Vipers, II.1237
ATI: Vipers Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

198. Rathūpama Suttaɱ, IV.175

The Buddha teaches a formula for living fully and at ease here with good grounds for attaining arahantship in the future: guard the senses, exercise moderation in eating and practice wakefulness.

PTS: Delighting In, IV.110
WP 239: The Simile of the Chariot, II.1239

199. Kummopama Suttaɱ, IV.177

The Buddha likens guarding the senses to the safety of the tortoise when it draws into it's shell it's head and limbs to protect itself from predators.

PTS: The Tortoise, IV.112
WP 240: The Simile of the Tortoise, II.1240
ATI: The Tortoise

200. Paṭhama Dārukkhandhopama Suttaɱ, IV.179

The Buddha teaches that by following high view (samma ditthi) one naturally drifts towards and ends up in Nibbana in the same way that a log in the Ganghes, if it avoids all the obstacles, will drift towards and end up in the ocean.
One can see where a misunderstanding of this sutta could lead to the 'inaction' school of Buddhism. What this school is missing is that little bit about avoiding the obstacles. 'Not-doing' is 'intentional not-doing', not 'doing nothing.' The obstacles must be avoided by conscious, intentionally not engaging with them. When a lie would obtain some goal, consciously, intentionally not voicing that lie because doing otherwise would be in contradiction with high view.

PTS: The Log of Wood, IV.113
WP 241: The Simile of the Great Log 1, II.1241
ATI: The Log Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

201. Dutiya Dārukkhandhopama Suttaɱ, IV.181

The Buddha teaches that by following high view (samma ditthi) one naturally drifts towards and ends up in Nibbana in the same way that a log in the Ganghes, if it avoids all the obstacles, will drift towards and end up in the ocean.

PTS: The Log of Wood 2, IV.115
WP 242: The Simile of the Great Log 2, II.1243

202. Avassuta-Pariyāya Suttaɱ, IV.182

Maha Moggallana delivers a discourse on what constitutes a leaky bhikkhu. If a bhikkhu dwells attached to the pleasures of the senses, averse to the pains of the senses then he is conquored by the senses and subject to old age, sickness and death and is a leaky bhikkhu. If he is not attached to the pleasures of the senses, averse to the pains of the senses then he is conquoror of the senses and not subject to old age, sickness and death and is not a leaky bhikkhu. One of a very few places where we get to hear the voice of Maha Moggallana.
I, as did Maha Moggalana, will leave it up to your imaginations as to what is intended by the idea of 'leaky.'

PTS: Lustful, IV.116
WP 243: Exposition on the Corrupted, II.1244
ATI: Soggy Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

203. Dukkha-Dhamma Suttaɱ, IV.188

The Buddha explains what it means to know and see the appearing and disappearing of all states of pain and how, so seeing one is freed from sense experience.
The distinctive lesson here is the emphatic statement that by knowing and seeing the appearing and disappearing of body, sense experience, perception, own-making and consciousness one is knowing and seeing all states of pain. The sutta includes helpful similes and methods for practicing to attain such knowing and seeing.

PTS: States of Ill, IV.121
WP 244: States That Entail Suffering, II.1248

204. Kiɱsukopama Suttaɱ, IV.191

A bhikkhu questions a number of bhikkhus about the nature of perfection and receives different answers from each. Consulting the Buddha it is explained that there are many different approaches to Nibbana.
The simile of a tree seen at different seasons of the year is given for the idea of different views of the approach to Nibbana. The different approaches mentioned are: seeing the arising and passing away of the sense experiences; seeing the arising and passing away of the stockpiles of fuel; seeing the arising and passing away of the four great characteristics (earth, water, firelight and wind); and seeing that whatsoever comes into existence is something that must go out of existence. Note that the last one is usually found as the formula for Streamwinning. In other words, though that is the insight gained at the entrance to Streamwinning, it is also a path all the way to Nibbana. Then the Buddha gives another simile to illustrate the idea of different approaches while given another approach which is more fundamental, general and encompassing than the others, that is, following the Eightfold Path. He describes a king's fortress with six gates and a gatekeeper and the visitation by 'a swift pair of messengers' who deliver the truth to the king who sits at the crossroads. The terms of the simile are defined. Note that 'the swift pair of messengers' are the practices of 'calm' and 'insight'. Not just one or the other, but both.

PTS: The Judas Tree, IV.124
WP 245: The Kimsuka Tree, II.1251
ATI: The Riddle Tree

205. Vīṇopama Suttaɱ, IV.195

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus two similes: one for understanding the way mindfulness works to develop control over the inclination to indulge in sense pleasures, and the other, the famous simile of the Lute, to illustrate the emptiness of the pleasures of the senses.
This is an exquisite sutta to invision. Picture the field of ripe corn and then the cow and her delight in finding such a sumptuous meal only to end up being brow-beaten again and again until she learns to associate the field of corn with the beating, then imagine the somewhat feebleminded king, fascinated by the enchanting sounds of the lute and in a wonderfully thick-headed way searching for the sounds in the lute itself, taking it apart and not finding the sounds, in disgust shattering it to bits. The one simile folds right into the other and the combination blossoms out into a powerful lesson. This is our dilemma. It's like the smoker who knows smoking is bad for him and will lead him to a painful end but who must, to quit, engage in an enormous battle with his desire to smoke. Just understanding the problem of pain in existence and rebirth isn't enough. We need to break the habit and the way that is done is to so investigate the nature of sense pleasures that we see that they always, inevitably lead to a brow-beating. It's only at the point where we abandon all hope that there is a way to engage in pleasurs of the senses without suffering the beating that we finaly reach the resigned detachment that is the freedom of Nibbana. "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here!" This is the subtle trickery of Mara, that we read this as the sign over the entrance to hell, when it is the sign over the entrance to Nibbana.

PTS: The Lute, IV.128
WP 246: The Simile of the Lute, II.1253
ATI: The Lute

206. Chapāṇa Suttaɱ, IV.198

The Buddha teaches a simile for the control of the six senses by way of contrasting the result of tying each of six different animals with six different tastes when they are each tied to the others versus when they are each tied to a central stake.

PTS: The Six Animals, IV.
WP 247: The Simile of the Six Animals, II.1255
ATI: The Six Animals
Discussion

207. Yavakalāpi Suttaɱ, IV.201

The Buddha likens sense experience to a shief of wheat being beaten by six farmers, then he likens the desire for rebirth to that same shief of wheat being beaten again by a seventh farmer. He then instructs the bhikkhus that any notion of things being the self or belonging to the self, any theories concerning such are vain, prideful assumptions with shaky unstable foundations.
Is it barley or corn? PED says 'corn', but in Britain 'corn' is wheat. Corn, 'maize', was not introduced into India until somewhere around 300 AD (so they say — actually they say it was much later than that, (c. 1400), but there is good evidence that the Chinese were trading with the Mexicans as well as the Indians around 300 AD.). Bhk. Bodhi does not explain his choice of 'barley'. ? Barley corns?

PTS: The Sheaf of Corn, IV.
WP 248: The Sheaf of Barley, II.1257
ATI: The Sheaf of Barley


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Salayatanasamyutta]  [Vedanasamyutta]  [Matugamasamyutta]  [Jambhukhadakasamyutta]  [Samandakasamyutta]  [Moggallanasamyutta]  [Cittasamyutta]  [Gamanisamyutta]  [Asankhatasamyutta]  [Avyakatasamyutta]

 


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