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Index of Suttas of the Saɱyutta Nikāya
Saḷāyatana Vagga
Vedana Saɱyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

IV. Saḷāyatana Vagga

PTS: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 4, Saḷāyatana-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1894. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 4, Saḷāyatana-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on the Sixfold Sphere of Sense and Other Subjects, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Book of the Six Sense Bases, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight.
BD: The translations of M. Olds

II. Vedana Saɱyutta, IV.204

PTS: Kindred Sayings on Feeling, IV.136
WP: Connected Discourses on Feeling, II.1260
Wheel 1303: Contemplation of Feeling The Discourse-Grouping on the Feelings, Nyanaponika Thera.

I. Sagāthā Vagga, IV.204

1. Samādhi Suttaɱ, IV.204

The Buddha defines 'vedana' (sense-experience) as consisting of three sensations: pleasant sensation, unpleasant sensation, and sensation that is not pleasant but not unpleasant.
There is no explanation as to why this sutta is titled 'Samadhi', 'Serenity'; (woodward's 'Concentration').
This 'Book' is distinguished by the inclusion of verses after each sutta. It is a matter of speculation as to whether or not these verses were uttered by Gotama. They do not appear to be in contradiction with the doctrine, but are occasionally ... somewhat removed from the sutta.

PTS: Concentration, IV.136
WP: Concentration, II.1260
ATI: Concentration, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

2. Sukhaya Suttaɱ, IV.204

The Buddha defines 'vedana' (sense-experience) as consisting of three sensations: pleasant sensation, unpleasant sensation, and sensation that is not pleasant but not unpleasant.

PTS: For Pleasure, IV.136
WP: Pleasure, II.1260
ATI: Happiness, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

3. Pahānena Suttaɱ, IV.205

After defining the three sensations, the Buddha describes how the residual inclination to lust for these sensations must be abandoned.

PTS: By Abandoning, IV.137
WP: Abandonment, II.1261
ATI: Giving Up, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

4. Pātāla Suttaɱ, IV.206

Using the figure of the maelstrom the Buddha describes the difference between the ordinary commoner and the arahant when experiencing the unpleasant.

PTS: The Bottomless Pit, IV.138
WP: The Bottomless Abyss, II.1262
ATI: The Bottomless Chasm, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans
The Bottomless Chasm, Nyanaponika Thera, trans

5. Daṭṭhabba Suttaɱ, IV.207

Seeing pleasant sensation as painful, painful sensation as a thorn, and not-painful-but-not-pleasant sensation as temporary, the bhikkhu is seeing things in the best way and by perfect understanding of pride brings pain to an end.

PTS: By So Regarding, IV.139
WP: Should Be Seen, II.1263
ATI: To Be Known, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

6. Sallattena Suttaɱ, IV.207

Both the common person and the Arahant experience painful sensations, pleasant sensations and sensations that are not painful but not pleasant. The Buddha explains that the difference between the two is that the Arahant does not add to his pain by an emotional or 'follow-on' component, that is to say a reaction rather than a response.

PTS: By the Barb, IV.139
WP: The Dart, II.1263
ATI: The Arrow, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans
The Dart, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.
BD: By Arrow Shot, M. Olds, trans.

7. Paṭhama Gelañña Suttaɱ, IV.210

The Buddha visits the sick ward and delivers a sermon on being prepared for death through recollectedness and self-awareness.
"Sata and sampajāna" Woodward: "collected and composed"; Bhikkhu Bodhi and Nayanaponika Thera: "mindful and clearly comprehending"; Bhikkhu Thanissaro: "mindful and alert." SATA p.p. of > 'Sarati': to remember; SAMPAJĀNA: saŋ+pajāna: own or self + know, understand.
It is interesting to note the difference in customs and culture between our own and the Buddha's time as can be seen in this sutta. If someone today were to walk into a ward for the terminally ill and deliver a sermon on being prepared to die he would be thought to be in very poor taste ... and as a result of respecting this convention those who were in fact facing immanent death would not hear what they needed to hear. For whose sake, for whose comfort in blindness, then, is our custom of never mentioning death to the dying? Of course our situation is so twisted up today [Sunday, May 31, 2015 8:25 AM] that the dying themselves would become offended at this 'behavior in bad taste'.

PTS: Sickness (i), IV.142
WP: The Sick Ward 1, II.1266
ATI: The Sick Ward, Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
At the Sick Room, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

8. Dutiya Gelañña Suttaɱ, IV.213

The Buddha visits the sick ward and delivers a sermon on being prepared for death through recollectedness and self-awareness.
Identical with the previous sutta with 'contact' (phassa) being substituted for 'body'. Nyanaponika Thera has footnoted that 'phassa' (which he translates as 'sense-impression') is 'mental factor and does not signify physical impingement'. I don't know where he gets this idea. First the literal translation of 'phassa' is 'touch'. It is understood to be the contact of a sense object with a sense organ together with consciousness. And here it is, if contrasted with the previous sutta, a synonym for 'body'. Surely this is physical or at most physical/mental impingement. The reverse would actually imply the creation of the sense organ and object by its own sense-consciousness ... Pajapati's error. "Own-eye-impact, beggars, comes to be as a result of eye data, it is not that eye data comes to be as a result of own-eye-impact," SN 2.14.3 (and the entire vagga
If what Nyanaponika Thera is saying is that 'phassa' is to be defined as 'the experience of contact,' (which would be a mental factor) this does not comport with this very sutta which is saying that the experience, 'vedana', arises as a consequence of the contact.
My version of BJT has simply copied the previous sutta without making the appropriate changes. In fact my version of the BJT Pali has been very poorly edited throughout this volume. Perhaps this has been corrected in later editions, but be careful!

PTS: Sickness 2, IV.144
WP: The Sickward 2, II.1268
ATI: At the Sick Room 2, Nyanaponika Thera, trans

9. Anicca Suttaɱ, IV.214

The Buddha defines the three sensations and describes them as inconstant, own-made, originating as a result, things under destruction, things fading away, ending things.

PTS: Impermanent, IV.144
BD: The Unsettled, Olds, trans.
WP: Impermanent, II.1269
ATI: Impermanent, Nyanaponika Thera, trans

10. Phassamūlaka Suttaɱ, IV.215

The Buddha points out that sensations rooted in contact are dependent on that contact and come to an end when that contact comes to an end.

PTS: Rooted in Contact, IV.144
WP: Rooted in Contact, II.1270
ATI: Rooted in Sense-impression

I. Rahogata Vagga, IV.216

11. Rahogataka Suttaɱ, IV.216

The Buddha explains in detail the meaning of the statement that all that which is joined with sense-experience is joined with pain. The Buddha describes the attaining of Awakening as gradual.

PTS: Given to Solitude, IV.145
WP: Alone, Bhk. Bodhi, trans. II.1270
ATI: Alone Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.
Secluded, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.
Buddhism in Translations, SN SALV 56.11. (Excerpt). Warren, trans.

12. Pathama Ākāsam Suttaɱ, IV.218

The Buddha likens the various sensations to the various sorts of winds that blow.

PTS: The Sky (i), IV.146
WP: The Sky (1), Bhk. Bodhi, trans. II.1272
ATI: In the Sky, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

13. Dutiya Ākāsam Suttaɱ, IV.219

The Buddha likens the various sensations to the various sorts of winds that blow.

PTS: The Sky 2, IV.147
WP: The Sky 2, Bhk. Bodhi, trans. II.1273

14. Āgāra Suttaɱ, IV.219

The Buddha likens the various sense experiences to the various sorts of guests that inhabit a guest house.
This sutta is one of the few places where the vedanas are described in the two modes found in the Satipatthana Sutta. It is very important to understand how this works. The sense experience produced by contact with an identical object or situation can be experienced in different, opposite ways depending on one's mental state, perspective or orientation. From the point of view of one letting go of the world, what would have produced a pleasant sense experience for one downbound to the world will be experienced as unpleasant (both in it's nature as temptation, and as transient and leading inevitably to pain); what would have produced an unplesant sense experience will be experienced as plesant (because experienced as no longer pertaining to the self) and what would have been experienced as a neutral sense experience inclining the downbound to seek pleasant sense experience will be experienced by the renunciate as a taste of Nibbāna. For the one the experience is impersonal and mental and does not equate to our idea of 'sensation' but is more like 'idea'; for the other it is a subjective experience that is a mixture of bodily and mental sensations. Because of the need for the one word to satisfy both uses I suggest that vedana be translated not as 'sensation' but as 'sense experience' or just 'experience' depending on whether the case is of the one downbound to the world or is beyond sense-experience. 'Feeling' which is the most frequent translation, but which does not relate to the literal meaning of 'vedana' ('the given experience'), does not well serve both needs.

PTS: The Guest-House, IV.147
WP: The Guest House, Bhk. Bodhi, trans. II.1273
ATI: The Guest House, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

15. Paṭhama Santakam (aka Ānanda) Suttaɱ, IV.219

Ananda asks the Buddha to define various aspects of sense experience.

PTS: Property, IV.148
WP: Ānanda, Bhk. Bodhi, trans. II.1273
ATI: To Ananda, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

16. Dutiya Santakam (aka Ānanda) Suttaɱ, IV.221

The Buddha defines various aspects of sense experience.

PTS: Property 2, IV.149
WP: Ananda 2, II.1274

17. Paṭhama Aṭṭhaka Suttaɱ, IV.221

A number of bhikkhus ask the Buddha to define various aspects of sense experience.

PTS: Eightfold (i), IV.149
WP: 17-18: A Number of Bhikkhus 1, II.1274

18. Dutiya Aṭṭhaka Suttaɱ, IV.222

The Buddha defines various aspects of sense experience.

PTS: Eightfold 2, IV.149
WP: 17-18: A Number of Bhikkhus 2, II.1274

19. Pañcakaŋga Suttaɱ, IV.223

The Buddha explains that he has taught an understanding of sense experience in multiple ways each of which is complimentary, not contradictory with the others. He then teaches his understanding of pleasure by describing a progression from gross sensual pleasures to the sublime pleasure of the ending of perception and sense experience.
A very important sutta for the understanding of the meaning of 'vedana' and also for the Buddhist understanding of pleasure or happiness.

PTS: Fivetools, IV.149
WP: Pañcakaŋga, II.1274
ATI: Carpenter Fivetools, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

20. Bhikkhunā Suttaɱ, IV.228

The Buddha explains that he has taught an understanding of sense experience in multiple ways each of which is complimentary, not contradictory with the others. He then teaches his understanding of pleasure by describing a progression from gross sensual pleasures to the sublime pleasure of the ending of perception and sense experience.

PTS: By A Brother, IV.154
WP: Bhikkhus, II.1278

III. Attha-Sata-Pariyaya Vagga, IV.230

The Method of the 108

 

21. Moḷiya Sīvaka Suttaɱ IV.230

The Buddha describes various sources of pain in the world that are not directly attributable to kamma.
Note carefully that this is a precise response to the precise wording of a statement being made, that is that all sense experiences is driven (hetu) by past deeds. The meaning is that while all sense experiences can be said to result from the past deeds that brought about the current life, there are certain experiences in life that are driven by impersonal, non-karmic forces.

PTS: Sīvaka, IV.154
WP: Sivaka, II.1278
ATI: To Sivaka, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.
ATI: To Sivaka, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

22. Aṭṭhasata-Pariyāya Suttaɱ, IV.231

The Buddha lists the various ways he categorizes the sense experiences.

PTS: One hundred and Eight, IV.156
WP: The Theme of the Hundred and Eight, II.1280
ATI: One Hundred Eight Feelings, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.
The One-hundred-and-eight Exposition, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

23. Bhikkhu Suttaɱ, IV.232

A Bhikkhu is taught about the sense experiences, their arisings, the way to their arisings, their endings, the way to their endings, their satisfactions and their miseries, and the way of escape.

PTS: The Brother, IV.157
WP: A Certain Bhikkhu, II.1281
ATI: To a Certain Bhikkhu, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

24. Pubbeñāṇa Suttaɱ IV.233

The Buddha describes the precise knowledge of sense experience that arose to him that helped bring about his awakening.

N.B.: Bhikkhu Bodhi, following his mss, divides this sutta into 2; subsequent suttas for the WP ed are included in the Sutta Index citation under the related PTS sutta but are given there with the WP ed. sutta number. The WP file number will reflect the PTS sutta numbering system. The Sutta number appearing at the top of the display will indicate the PTS sutta number with the WP sutta number in square brackets and will link to the corresponding PTS sutta in the Sutta Index.

PTS: Knowledge of the Past, IV.158
WP 24: Before, II.1281
25: Knowledge, II.1281

25. Bhikkhunā Suttaɱ, IV.234

A number of Bhikkhus are taught about the sense experiences, their arisings, the way to their arisings, their endings, the way to their endings, their satisfactions and their miseries, and the way of escape.

PTS: By a Brother, IV.158
WP 26: A Number of Bhikkhus, II.1282

26. Samaṇa-Brāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, IV.234

Understanding sense experience, its arising, its passing away, its satisfactions and its misery and understanding the escape from sense experience is stated to be the way that the true shaman and brahman are recognized by true shamen and brahmins and this is also the benefit of having lived the life of a shaman or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (i), IV.158
WP 27: Ascetics and Brahmins, II.1282

27. Dutiya Samaṇa-Brāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, IV.235

Understanding sense experience, its arising, its passing away, its satisfactions and its misery and understanding the escape from sense experience is stated to be the way that the true shaman and brahman are recognized by true shamen and brahmins and this is also the benefit of having lived the life of a shaman or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (ii), IV.159
WP 28: Ascetics and Brahmins 2, II.1282

28. Tatiya Samaṇa-Brāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, IV.235

Understanding sense experience, its arising, its passing away, its satisfactions and its misery and understanding the escape from sense experience is stated to be the way that the true shaman and brahman are recognized by true shamen and brahmins and this is also the benefit of having lived the life of a shaman or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (iii), IV.159
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins 3, II.1283

29. Suddhika-Vedanā Nirāmisam Suttaɱ IV.235

A sutta describing the carnal, the carnal-free, and the carnal-free beyond the carnal-free forms of entheusiasm, pleasure and detachment.
A sutta which is very helpful in understanding 'pīti' 'sukha' and 'upekkhā', and the way many other terms are to be understood (and translated), that is, broadly, not rigidly. All three of these must be understood in terms of words having aspects which are carnal and yet other aspects which can exist in the Arahant. There is also an interesting gradation of the jhānas which is rare if not unique to this sutta

PTS: Purified and Free from Carnal Taint, IV.159
WP 30-31: Simple Version and Spiritual II.1283 (Bhikkhu Bodhi, following his mss, breaks this sutta into two separate suttas)
ATI: 31: Unworldly, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Salayatanasamyutta]  [Vedanasamyutta]  [Matugamasamyutta]  [Jambhukhadakasamyutta]  [Samandakasamyutta]  [Moggallanasamyutta]  [Cittasamyutta]  [Gamanisamyutta]  [Asankhatasamyutta]  [Avyakatasamyutta]

 


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