Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Index to the Suttas of the Saɱyutta Nikāya
Mahā Vagga
Satipaṭṭhana Saɱyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

V. Mahā Vagga

PTS: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1898. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Great Chapter, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Great Book, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight,
BD: The translations of M. Olds.

 

III. Satipaṭṭhana Samyutta, V.141

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on the Stations of Mindfulness, V.119
WP: Connected Discourses on the Establishments of Mindfulness, II.1627

I. Ambapāli Vagga, V.141

[1] Ambapālī Suttaɱ, V.141

The Buddha describes the one sure way for beings to overcome grief and lamentation, pain and misery, to finding the method, and realizing Nibbana.
An exact parallel to the opening of the Satipatthana Sutta.
Both Bhikkhu Bodhi and Woodward give references in their footnotes helpful for anyone interested in the meaning of 'ekāyana maggo'. That is, is it 'the one and only way' or (Woodward): 'the sole way'; or (Bhk. Bodhi): 'the one-way path'; or (Soma Thera, Nyanasatta Thera): 'the only way'; or (Nyanaponika Thera): 'the sole way'; or (Bhk. Thanissaro): 'the direct path'; (Sister Upalavana): 'There is only one way'.
There is someing in the psyche of the times (and one which I have shared) that rebels agains the idea that the Buddha could be saying that his, and not just his but this particular one of his methods, is the only way to salvation. There is another way of looking at this. That is that whatever anyone else may wish to think about their (religion, discipline, philosophy) no other system provides a solution to the problem of rebirth. This being seen and attained by a person making such a statement, it is not a brag, but is simply a statement of a true fact. The issue then becomes only one of internal contradiction. How can this be the one and only when there are a half dozen others which have been declared to lead to Arahantship? The response to that, then, is that within the Buddha's system it can be shown that any of the other methods which are declared to be paths to arahantship can be shown to be the equivalent of the four settings up of mind.

PTS: Ambapālī, V.119
WP: Ambapālī, II.1627

[2] Sata Suttaɱ, V.142

The Buddha instructs the bhikkhus to be mindful and self-aware. Then he explains how to mind and be self-aware.
Here we have a very clear explanation of how the satipatthana technique is to be applied. The 'self-aware' aspect (sampajāna) (which takes up the bulk of the instructions in the Satipatthana Sutta) is the aspect of the practice concerned with observing and being aware; the 'minding' (sati) aspect is the governing of the mental attitude towards and reaction to what is observed.

PTS: Mindful, V.120
WP: Mindful, II.1628

[3] Bhikkhu Suttaɱ, V.142

The Buddha teaches a bhikkhu a fundamental course in the Dhamma which brings about his arahantship.
In this sutta we find the basics of what was to become a part of the refrain in the Satipatthana suttas: i.e.: "Thus he lives observing body through body with regard to the self
or he lives observing body through body with regard to externals
or he lives observing body through body with regard to himself and externals."

PTS: Monk, V.121
WP: A Bhikkhu, II.1628

[4] Sālā Suttaɱ, V.144

The Buddha instructs the bhikkhus in how to instruct the novices in developing the four settings-up of memory.
I have done a translation here because I have a slightly different take than that of either Woodward or Bhikkhu Bodhi on the intention of this sutta.

PTS: Sālā, V.122
WP: At Sālā, II.1630
BD: The Lesson at Sālā, Olds, trans.

[5.] Kusalarāsi Suttaɱ, V.145

The Buddha contrasts the Hindrances with the Four Settings-up of Mind.

PTS: A Heap of Merit, V.124
WP: A Heap of the Wholesome, II.1631

[6] Sakuṇagghi Suttaɱ, V.146

In a fable describing a battle between a falcon and a quail the Buddha instructs the bhikkhus of the dangers of roaming among the five cords of sense pleasure and the safety of sticking to the four settings-up of memory.
Petty nit: The translations of Bhk. Bodhi and Woodward speak of the quail as taking refuge inside the clod of earth. But clods of earth are solid. What must be being spoken of is taking refuge behind or beside or between or among clods or even under an overturned clod. Bhk. Thanissaro: 'behind'; Rouse (in the Jataka Story #168): 'just turned over' (i.e., stepped aside, it being difficult for the Falcon in full descent to distinguish between the clod and the quail, which, given our use of the term 'clod' for a fool, gives life to the fable.)
Bhk. Thanissaro's translation is the most coherant.

PTS: The Falcon, V.125
WP: The Hawk, II.1632
ATI: The Hawk

[7] Makkaṭa Suttaɱ, V.148

In a fable describing the way a foolish monkey traps himself trying to rescue himself from entrapment by a tar baby, the Buddha instructs the bhikkhus of the dangers of roaming among the five cords of sense pleasure and the safety of sticking to the four settings-up of memory.
Another nit here. The trap is a post covered with tar. The Monkey, to free his one hand, does not grab the one hand with the other, but pushes on the post hoping that with that leverage he will free his stuck hand, but that sticks too. In this way the other appendages also get stuck. Woodward's 'grabs it' and 'grabs them' referring to the limbs, not the trap, breaks down when it is the head that gets stuck. And further grabing the one hand with the other would not necessarily result in the second hand getting stuck and might even give the monkey strength enough to free the hand. And how could even a monkey grab both hands with one foot? Etc.
The mistake that is illustrated by the fable is trying to free one's self from the pain consequent upon indulgence in (getting stuck in) sense pleasures by indulging in other sense pleasures. That is trying to free the stuck hand by pushing against the trap. So the whole sutta is spoiled by this error.
Woodward may be forgiven such things as he is closing in on the end of a massive work of translation and fatigue is inevitable, but where were the editors and proofreaders? I am proofreading from the 6th printing, the first of which was published in 1930!

PTS: The Monkey, V.127
WP: The Monkey, II.1633
ATI: The Monkey, Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.
The Foolish Monkey (excerpt), Andrew Olendzki, trans.

[8] Sūdo Suttaɱ, V.149

The Buddha explains that in the same way as an incompetant cook who does not note the needs and responses of those he cooks for gets no gains, fame or favors, in the same way the bhikkhu who does not live developing the four settings-up of the memory gets no advancement in this Dhamma and Discipline.

PTS: The Cook, V.128
WP: The Cook, II.1634
ATI: The Cook

[9] Gilāna Suttaɱ, V.152

At a point shortly before his death the Buddha, after supressing a bout of his illness is asked by Ananda about how the Sangha is to be governed after his death.
The Buddha's response amounts to saying that the Sangha is not lead by a leader as such, but by the Dhamma. That even the Buddha himself does not think of himself as leading the Sangha, but teaching the Dhamma which is, if there is any leader, the leader. It is in this episode that the Buddha declares that the Dhamma has been taught by him without the closed fist of the guru. That there is no secret inner teaching distinct from the outward teaching.
I hear this statement in conjunction with the question concering leadership. The Buddha is saying that the Sangha is not run like a cult with leadership passed down from master to master. (Of course today we find that this is exactly how most Sanghas are run with the inevitable result that faith is placed in 'lineage' and the dubious teachings of 'patriarchs' rather than in understanding the Dhamma for one's self and with the further result of animosities between Sanghas and the spread of confusion within and without the community.) The Dhamma is taught fully exposed and individuals understand it according to their own capacities and effort. Leadership such as it exists (ideally simple teacher/student relationships) is according to individual merit. As for esoteric vs. exoteric, or internal vs. external it is obvious that there is deep meaning to be discovered in the suttas. Similies to take one example, are in their very nature things of 'levels of meaning'. The difference is that the deeper meaning found in the suttas is not secret, hidden from those who do not possess private knowledge. It's out there to be discovered by anyone who digs for it. In fact it could be said that the main effort of the Dhamma is to bring as many people as possible to an understanding of it's deeper meaning.

PTS: Sick, V.130
WP: Ill, II.1636

[10] Bhikkhni-vāsaka Suttaɱ, V.154

The Buddha explains the approach to the four settings-up of memory for the learner and for one who has attained the goal.
As Andrew Olendzki points out in his introduction to his translation of this sutta, it is not well known, but it is one of a very few suttas that go the one level beyond the presentation of method into the technique for using it in meditation practice. It ranks up there in the top ten of the most helpful suttas for meditators. It is very reminiscent of the Mahā Suññata Suttaṃ.
I have done a translation applying my best understanding. This is a sutta where it is highly recommended that one compare translations and if possible dig into the Pali. Each translation is slightly different in approach and the differences will have dramatic influences on practice.
My take is that the Buddha perceived that Ananda did not fully understand how the four settings-up of memory were to be used to develop intent to attain happiness and then, happiness attained how they were to be used after letting go of all intentions with regard to the future and the past, as simply a pleasant means to observe the present. This sutta should also interest those who have followed Castaneda's Don Juan in that the explanation here of intent is very clear and it will advance their studies beyond his teachings which stop at the development of intent.

PTS: The Nuns' Lodging, V.190
WP: The Bhikkhunis' Quarter, II.1638
ATI: Directed and Undirected Meditation (excerpt), Andrew Olendzki, trans.
BD: The Nun's Investiture, Olds, trans.

II. Nālanda Vagga, V.158

[11] Mahāpuriso Suttaɱ, V.158

Anuruddha asks about the Great Man (MahaPurisa, Superman) and the Buddha explains that one should be called a Great Man only if he has attained freedom of heart. He explains that this is attained by way of the four satipatthanas. Woodward uses the term 'superman' when he did not need to and then it looks like he tried to dissassociate it from it's then current use by the Nazis. Possibly an attempt to short circuit misunderstandings. In fact Hitler was aware of Buddhism and obviously borrowed that term from that source and made use of it in his racial propaganda. It is clear in the suttas however, that in the same way as the word Ariyan does stand for the race, it is it's meaning as 'Aristocratic' in mind and behavior that is the use to which it is put in Gotama's system, so the word MahāPurisas, stands for qualities attained through understanding and behavior and not the natural attributes of a race. The Ayya called themselves Ariyans in a similar way that many peoples around the world call their tribes 'The People'.

PTS: The Superman, V.137
BD: The Great Man
WP: A Great Man, II.1640

[12] Nālandā Suttaɱ, V.159

The Buddha questions Sariputta about his statement that there never was, never would be or was not now any greater teacher of liberation of heart than the Buddha.
Sariputta's response is instructive and anyone interested in becoming a streamwinner should study it until it is understood. The issue is how it is possible to have certainty in a case such as this. See also in this regard the discussion 'Certainty without Faith'. Note that Woodward has Sariputta speaking of 'faith'; Bhk. Bodhi has him speaking of 'confidence'. These terms in English can imply 'blind faith', but that is not how this is to be understood. The term to undertand is 'pasanna' to be plesed or satisfied to the point of having eliminated doubt.

PTS: Nālandā, V.138
WP: Nālandā, II.1640

[13] Cuṇḍa Suttaɱ, V.161

The Buddha consoles Ananda upon the death of Sariputta with a discourse on the ephemeral nature of that which has come to be.
Another example of the very unique way in which the Buddhist deals with grief over the loss of a loved one. There is an assumption in this position of the ultimate rationality of man which is inspiring. Essentially grief is considered to be a fault in the individual experiencing the grief. It depends on ignorance of the inevitability of change in existing things and represents not a concern for the fate of the dead person but a selfish concern with one's own loss, a loss which is itself an illusion based on the assumption of self.

PTS: Cunda, V.140
WP: Cunda, II.1642
ATI: About Cunda (Sariputta's Passing Away), Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans
About Cunda (Sariputta's Passing Away), Nyanaponika Thera, trans

[14] Cela Suttaɱ V.163

The Buddha remarks upon how empty the sangha appears to him since the deaths of Sariputta and Moggalana.
There is confusion here with regard to the wording of the third paragraph of the Pali and the translations reflect this confusion. The problem is that depending on the way one breaks the sentences and the change of one letter turning 'empty' into 'not-empty', according as one hears it, the meaning can be made to appear to imply that the Buddha is suffering grief. ... a no-no. Further, Woodward's translation gives the appearance of there being a place of current residence of Sariputta and Moggalana. I have greater faith in the PTS Pali. My translation of the PTS Pali of this passage:

"Even to me, beggars, this company appears to be empty.

With Sariputta and Moggallana having attained Parinibbana, beggars,
to me this company is empty.

There is, though, no wondering with regard to destination,
that is as to the direction
where Sariputta and Moggallana abide.

PTS: Ukkavela, V.143
WP: Ukkacela, II.1644
ATI: At Ukkacela, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.

[15] Bāhiyo (or Bāhiko) Suttaɱ, V.165

The Buddha gives Bahiyo a teaching which leads to his becoming an Arahant.

PTS: Bāhiya (or Bāhika), V.145
WP: Bāhiya, II.1645

[16] Uttiya Suttaɱ, V.167

The Buddha gives Uttiya a teaching which leads to his becoming an Arahant.

PTS: Uttiya, V.146
WP: Uttiya, II.1646

[17] Ariya Suttaɱ, V.167

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus about the four settings-up of memory.

PTS: Ariyan, V.146
WP: Noble, II.1646

[18] Brahmā Suttaɱ, V.167

The Buddha describes his thinking concerning the four settings-up of memory at a time just after his awakening. His thinking is confirmed by Brahma Sahampati.

PTS: Brahmā, V.147
WP: Brahmā, II.1647

Acrobats

[19] Sedaka (or Ekantaka) Suttaɱ, V.168

Illustrating his point with a story about the way acrobats should attend to their safety, the Buddha explains how it is that by attending to one's own safety, one attends to the safety of others.
With regard to the title and the picture we should have of the acrobats I believe Bhk. Thanissaro has the clearest presentation: this is the first of two suttas delivered at Desaka which conclude this chapter and this one deals with acrobats. The trick they perform is that of balancing on a bamboo pole. The Master balances on the pole, the student balances on the master after climbing up the pole and climing up on the shoulders of the master.
As to the meaning it is a response to the argument heard when outsiders speak of 'the selfishness of the Arahant' or the 'Theravada' or 'Hineyana School of Buddhism'. This comes up most frequently when speaking to students of the Mahayana schools of Buddhism or to those who have heard this selfishness argument from Mahayanists. It is by protecting one's self that one protects others; protecting others is accomplished by protecting one's self. Imagine the consequence if the Master, balancing on the bamboo pole, in stead of paying attention to his balance, pays attention to the balance of the student on his shoulders. Or similarly imagine the consequence if the student in stead of paying attention to his own balance, pays attention to the balance of the master. It is in everyone's interest that one first attend to one's own 'balance'; it is by attending to one's own best interests that one attends to the best interests of others.

PTS: Desakā (or Sole ending), V.148
WP: Sedaka, II.1648
ATI: At Sedaka (1: The Acrobat), Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.

Holding the Bowl

'Spill even one drop of that Soma-apo liquid and its: 'Off with your head!'.

[20] Janapadakalyāṇī Suttaɱ V.169

The Buddha provides a parable for the way a beggar must keep his head while walking his walk between the raging of the world and the temptations of the senses.
A very powerful sutta for those attempting celebacy. See also in this regard: SN 5.47.20; SN 2.17.22; Jāt. 1.96; and Dhammatalk Archive: 'Winds'.

PTS: The Countryside, V.150
WP: The Most Beautiful Girl of the Land, II.1649
ATI: At Sedaka (2: The Beauty Queen), Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.

III. Sīlaṭṭhiti Vagga, V.171

[21] Sīla Suttaɱ, V.171

Ananda and Bhadda discuss the purpose of ethical culture.
Woodward has contradicted himself in his translation of this sutta so that the question 'What is the purpose of sīla' is not answered, and in stead the purpose of the four settings-up of memory is made to be the creation of sīla. Bhk. Bodhi has got this much correctly. However Sīla is not [Bhk. Bodhi]: 'virtue'; or [Woodward]: 'habit' or even 'morality'. It is a manta (Skt. mantra) = 'to sow, etc.' = 'as ye sow, so shall ye reap' which is 'ethics.' That is, the counseling of behavior in accordance with a theory of how things work as opposed to 'morality' (counceling of behavior in accordance with normally accepted views on right and wrong) or 'virtue' (conformity to the 'right' in a theory of right and wrong). The behavior that is taught as best by the Buddha is that which conforms to one's own best interests in accordance with his theory of kamma as reflected in the Four Truths. Ethics. As it happens the resulting guidlines closely parallel generally accepted ideas of morality and the behavior of those considered virtuous so it is easy to think that the difference is unimportant. It is important. Though the behaviors of those non-Buddhists who today are termed 'moral' and 'virtuous' are similar in many ways to those Buddhists who are called 'of ethical behavior', they are not similar in all ways and at just that point where the differences are important for accomplishing the goal, they deviate. To mistake generally accepted ideas of morality and virtue as identical with Buddhist ethical behavior is to risk making a wrong decision a such critical junctions as death, under the influence of drugs or when in jhāna one has come upon great personal power.
Before one is able to live in a body overseeing body (etc.) such as to be able to eliminate coveting and depression one must be able to see things clearly. In order to see things clearly one's vision must not be blinded by the bias which the mind automatically generates in order to rationalize unetical behavior. Hence the pre-requisite is the cultivation of ethical conduct. This is the order in which these things are developed in 'The Gradual Course,' Sīla and throughout the suttas.

PTS: Habit, V.151
WP: Virtue, II.1650

[22] Ṭhiti Suttaɱ, V.172

Ananda and Bhadda discuss the reasons for the short or long duration of the Dhamma after the death of the Buddha.
Woodward has translated 'Ṭhita' here as 'permanence' which should not be confused with the converse of the usual translation of 'anicca' as 'impermanence'. The basic meaning is 'stand' = establishment. The Dhamma is impermanent whether it last long or not.

PTS: Permanence, V.151
WP: Duration, II.1650

[23] Parihāna Suttaɱ, V.173

Ananda and Bhadda discuss the reasons for the continued presence or the passing away of the Dhamma.
Parihāna. Literally: 'thorough-oh-woe!'. It's not the decay or decline of the Dhamma, its the decay or decline of the presence of, practice of, recollection of the Dhamma here.

PTS: Decay, V.152
WP: Decline, II.1651

[24] Suddhaka Suttaɱ, V.173

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the four settings-up of memory in it's briefest form.
Suddhaka. = 'pure stuff'. The essence. The article in it's pure state. This is not about the person who has an understanding in such a way.

PTS: Puritan, V.152
WP: Simple Version, II.1651

[25] Brāhmaṇa Suttaɱ, V.174

A Brahmin asks the Buddha about what it is that determines if the Dhamma will last long or not.

PTS: The Brahmin, V.153
WP: A Certain Brahmin, II.1651

[26] Padesa Suttaɱ, V.174

The Venerable Sariputta, the venerable Maha Moggallana and the venerable Anuruddha discuss what constitutes a seeker.

PTS: Partial, V.153
WP: Partly, II.1652

[27] Samatta Suttaɱ, V.175

The Venerable Sariputta, the venerable Maha Moggallana and the venerable Anuruddha discuss what constitutes a non-seeker.
Aseka. A = non. Both Woodward [adept] and Bhk. Bodhi [one beyond training] translate the 'seka' of the previous sutta in a way that creates a 'being something' which is not in the spirit of the Dhamma. By retaining the original term and putting it's opposite into the negative (non-pupil), (non-trainee) or my 'non-seeker' we better show the idea (the arahant does not go on from being a seeker to being something else, he has simply stopped seeking because he has found what he is seeking) and follow more closely the Pali.

PTS: Perfectly, V.154
WP: Completely, II.1653

[28] Loka Suttaɱ, V.175

The Venerable Sariputta, the venerable Maha Moggallana and the venerable Anuruddha discuss the origin of Anuruddhas great psychic powers.
Loka is not really either 'world' or 'universe'. The world and the universe are lokas, but 'loka' means 'locus', 'location', 'focal point'. And the worlds being spoken of are not replicas of this world (say, as one would imagine seeing it from outer space) but of the way the world and worlds are perceived by the seer.

PTS: The Universe, V.154
WP: The World, II.1653

[29] Sirivaḍḍha Suttaɱ, V.176

Ananda comforts the householder Sirivaddha who declares himself as a non-returner in his presence.

PTS: Sirivaḍḍha, V.155
WP: Sirivaḍḍha, II.1654

[30] Mānadiṇṇa Suttaɱ, V.178

Ananda comforts the householder Manadinna who declares himself as a non-returner in his presence.

PTS: Mānadiṇṇa, V.156
WP: Mānadiṇṇa, II.1655

IV. Anussuta Vagga, V.178

[31] Anussuta Suttaɱ, V.178

The Buddha describes the process of awakening in himself at the time he discovered that what was happening was body examining body, sense-experience examining sense-experience, mental states examining mental states, Dhamma examining things; that these things should be understood as body examining body, sense-experience examining sense-experience, mental states examining mental states, Dhamma examining things; and when these things had been understood as body examining body, sense-experience examining sense-experience, mental states examining mental states, Dhamma examining things.
In other words he is describing here his first perception of non-self in things. That things have awareness of things independent of any essential self.
This is exactly parallel to the description of his awakening to the 'group of five' found in the second part of the first sutta.

PTS: Unheard Before, V.157
WP: Unheard Before, II.1655

[32] Virāga Suttaɱ, V.179

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that the four settings-up of memory lead to distaste, dispassion, ending, calm, self-awakening, knowledge and vision and Nibbana.

PTS: Dispassion, V.158
WP: Dispassion, II.1656

[33] Viraddha Suttaɱ, V.179

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is by the neglect or non-neglect of the four settings-up of memory that one does or does not attain the Aristocratic way to the end of Pain.

PTS: Neglected, V.158
WP: Neglected, II.1656

[34] Bhāvanā Suttaɱ, V.180

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is by the making to live of the four settings-up of memory that one reaches beyond the beyond.

PTS: Cultivation, V.158
WP: Development, II.1657

[35] Sata Suttaɱ, V.180

The Buddha teaches the beggars that one should live recollected and comprehending. See also the discussion.

PTS: Mindful, V.158
WP: Mindful, II.1657
ATI: Mindful, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Minding, Olds, trans.
Discussion

[36] Aññā Suttaɱ, V.181

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that serious application of the four settings-up of memory results in either attaining final knowledge in this life or the state of non-returning.

PTS: One of Two, V.159
WP: Final Knowledge, II.1657

[37] Chanda Suttaɱ, V.181

The Buddha describes to the bhikkhus how it is that by minding the body, sense-experiences, the heart and the Dhamma wishing is abandoned and that when wishing is abandoned the deathless is attained

PTS: Desire to Do, V.159
WP: Desire, II.1658
ATI: Desire, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Wishing, Olds, trans.

[38] Pariññāya Suttaɱ V.182

The Buddha describes to the bhikkhus how it is that by minding the body, sense-experiences, the heart and the Dhamma encyclopedic knowledge of the body, sense-experience, the heart and the Dhamma is acquired and when that is acquired the deathless is attained.

PTS: By Full Understanding, V.159
WP: Full Understanding, II.1658
ATI: Comprehension, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Encyclopedic Knowledge, Olds, trans.

[39] Bhāvanā Suttaɱ, V.182

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus how to make live the four settings-up of memory.

PTS: Cultivation, V.160
WP: Development, II.1659

[40] Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ, V.183

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the setting up of memory, the bringing to life the setting up of memory and the way to the bringing to life of the setting up of memory.
Woodward's translation of '-paṭṭhāna' as 'stations' breaks down in this translation where the use is put into the singular. Woodward begins with 'the four' (not in the Pali), but follows with 'a station' which is very awkward when it deals with the four together. I have changed it to the singlular throughout for internal consistency and consistency with the Pali. Bhk. Bodhi translates 'establishment'. Since '-paṭṭhāna' can also be understood in the sense of 'pasture' (resort or establishment as in residence, or alternatively as basis of nourishment or just 'basis') which would face the same issues as 'station', if 'station' or 'pasture' or 'resort' or the like is for some reason preferred, the solution would be to set up the sutta so that the whole sequence was repeated four times, once for each of the 'stations' and the Pali to then be considered an abridgment. There are precedents for such an arrangement.

PTS: Analysis, V.160
WP: Analysis, II.1659
ATI: Analysis of the Frames of Reference

V. Amata Vagga, V.184

[41] Amata Suttaɱ, V.184

The Buddha admonishes the bhikkhus to study the four settings-up of memory and not to miss their chance at attaining the Deathless.
There is a significant difference here in Woodward's understanding of the Pali and hense his translation. To understand the issues consult the various translations and especially the footnotes in my translation ... where I have quoted Bhk. Bodhi's footnotes which are not included in his on-line translation.

PTS: The Deathless, V.161
WP: The Deathless, II.1660
ATI: Deathless, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Deathless, Olds, trans.

[42] Samudaya Suttaɱ, V.184

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus the arising and ending of body, sense-experience, the heart and the Dhamma.
This sutta seems to have generated a great deal of confusion and debate continuing on down to our own time. Bhk. Thanissaro notes: This discourse is unusual in that it identifies the word satipatthana, not with the standard formula of the process of establishing mindfulness, but with the objects that form the frame of reference for that process. For example, instead of identifying the first satipatthana as, "There is the case where a monk remains focused on the body in and of itself — ardent, alert, and mindful — subduing greed and distress with reference to the world," it identifies it simply as "body."
For a detailed discussion of this issue and my proposed solution, along with the full text of the debate found in Points of Controversy, see the end of my translation.

PTS: Arising, V.161
WP: Origination, II.1660
ATI: Origination, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Arising, Olds, trans.

[43] Magga Suttaɱ, V.185

The Buddha describes his thinking concerning the four settings-up of memory at a time just after his awakening. His thinking is confirmed by Brahma Sahampati.

PTS: The Way, V.161
WP: The Path, II.1661

[44] Sata Suttaɱ, V.186

The Buddha instructs the bhikkhus to mind the body, sense-experiences, the heart and the Dhamma.

PTS: Mindful, V.163
WP: Mindful, II.1661

[45] Kusalarāsī Suttaɱ, V.186

The Buddha describes the four settings-up of memory as 'heap skillful!'.

PTS: A Heap of Merit, V.163
WP: A Heap of the Wholesome, II.1662

[46] Pāṭimokkha Suttaɱ, V.187

The Buddha gives a bhikkhu a teaching in brief: cultivate ethical behavior and the four settings-up of memory.

PTS: Obligation, V.163
WP: The Restraint of the Pāṭimokkha, II.1662

[47] Duccarita Suttaɱ, V.188

The Buddha gives a bhikkhu a teaching in brief: abandon unethical behavior and cultivate the four settings-up of memory.

PTS: Wrong Conduct, V.164
WP: Misconduct, II.1663

[48] Mittā Suttaɱ, V.189

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that those for whom they have friendly feelings should be urged to cultivate the four settings-up of memory.
Here the four settings-up of memory are presented in the Pali in the identical way they have always previously been presented, that is, as addressed to a bhikkhu. However as friends and relatives and blood relations would not always have been bhikkhus, it seems more likely the original of this sutta would have used a more neutral term. "Here your friends should ..." "Here a person should ..."; "Here one should ..."

PTS: Friends, V.165
WP: Friends, II.1663

[49] Vedanā Suttaɱ, V.189

For the thorough understanding of the three sensations arising from sense-experience the four settings-up of memory should be made to live.
There is a difference between (Bhk. Bodhi): "These four establishments of mindfulness, bhikkhus, are to be developed for the full understanding of these three feelings.
and
(Woodward): "For the full understanding of these three feelings
the four stations of mindfulness ought to be cultivated."
The former makes it appear that the satipatthanas entire purpose is the understanding of the three feelings; the latter allows for it to be one of the purposes. Simply understanding is not sufficient for the attainment of the goal; these feelings must also be abandoned, having abandoned them the resulting state must be perceived as freedom; and that freedom must be perceived as the freedom from pain one has been seeking.

PTS: Feelings, V.165
WP: Feelings, II.1664

[50] Āsava Suttaɱ, V.189

For the thorough understanding of the three corrupting influences (sense-pleasures, existing and blindness) the four settings-up of memory should be made to live.

PTS: Āsavas, V.165
WP: Taints, II.1664

VI. Gangā-Peyyālo

Covering suttas 51-62. The Buddha likens the flow of great rivers to the way in which developing and making much of the Four Settings-up of Memory brings one to Nibbana.

PTS: Ganga Repetition, V.167
WP: Ganges Repetition Series, II. 1665

 

[51] Paṭhama Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Eastward a, V.167
WP: Slanting to the East, II.1665

[52] Dutiya Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Eastward b.1, V.167
WP: 52-62: Slanting to the East, II.1665

[53] Tatiya Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Eastward b.2, V.167

[54] Catuttha Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Eastward b.3, V.167

[55] Pañcama Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Eastward b.4, V.167

[56] Chaṭṭha Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Eastward c, V.167

[57] Paṭhama Samudda Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Ocean (a), V.167

[58] Dutiya Samudda Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Ocean (b.1), V.167

[59] Tatiya Samudda Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Ocean (b.2), V.167

[60] Catuttha Samudda Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Ocean (b.3), V.167

[61] Pañcama Samudda Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Ocean (b.4), V.167

[62] Pañcama Samudda Suttaɱ, V.190

PTS: Ocean (c), V.167

VII. Appamāda Vagga: Viveka

Covering suttas 63-72. Nine similes for the caution that is the fundamental condition that leads to the bringing to life of the Four Settings-up of Memory.

[Suttas 63-104 are represented in the Pali only by indication that they should follow the same pattern as found in the parallel suttas at the end of the Magga Samyutta which was used also for the Bojjhanga Samyutta. However, the way the formula for the satipatthanas is to be adjusted to fit is not indicated. I have made a 'best guess' as to how this was originally constructed in the Pali, and have constructed a 'Woodward translation' and 'Pali' to match. The PTS Pali, Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi revert to the standard formula for the Satipatthanas in sutta 104, but this does not follow the pattern of the Magga Samyutta and is, I believe, a mistake all around. I have followed the pattern of the Magga Samyutta in my 'reconstructions'). In other words, these suttas are all just guesswork. Let me assure the reader, however, that there is no material missing from my organization. On the contrary it contains more material than would be found if the various abridgments had been followed faithfully.

PTS: Earnestness, V.167
WP: Diligence, II. 1665

Nine similes for the caution that is the fundamental condition that leads to the bringing to life of the Four Settings-up of Memory.

[63] Tathāgata Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Tathāgata, V.167
WP: 63-72: The Tathāgata, Etc., II.1665

[64] Pada Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: The foot, V.167

[65] Kūṭa Suttaɱ, V. 165

PTS: The roof-peak, V.167

[66] Mūla Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Wood, V.167

[67] Sāra Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Heart Wood, V.167

[68] Vassika Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Jasmine, V.167

[69] Rājā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Prince, V.167

[70] Canda Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Moon, V.167

[71] Suriya Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Sun, V.167

[72] Vattha Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Cloth, V.167

VIII. Balakaraṇīya Vagga, V.191

Covering suttas 73-84. The Buddha provides twelve similes illustrating various aspects of the Dhamma.

PTS: Deeds Requiring Strength, V.167
WP: Strenuous Deeds, II. 1666

 

[73] Bala Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: Strength, V.167
WP: 73-84: Strenuous, Etc., II.1666

[74] Bījā Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: Seed, V.167

[75] Nāga Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The Snake, V.167

[76] Rukkha Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The Tree, V.167

[77] Kumbha Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The Pot, V.167

[78] Sukiya Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: Bearded Wheat, V.167

[79] Ākāsa Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The Sky, V.167

[80] Paṭhama Megha Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The Rain-cloud a, V.167

[81] Dutiya Megha Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The Rain-cloud b, V.167

[82] Nāvā Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The Ship, V.167

[83] Āgantukā Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: For All Comers, V.167

[84] Nadī Suttaɱ, V.191

PTS: The River, V.167

IX. Esanā Vagga, V. 191

Covering suttas 85-94. The buddha explains how the Four Settings-up of Memory is to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of wishes, delusions, corrupting influences, existence, pain, closed-mindedness, flare-ups, sense-experience, and thirst.

PTS: Longings, V.167
WP: Searches, II. 1666

 

[85] Esanā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Longing, V.167
WP: 85-94: Searches, Etc., II.1666

[86] Vidhā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Conceits, V.167

[87] Āsava Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Asava, V.167

[88] Bhava Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Becoming, V.167

[89] Dukkhatā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Suffering, V.167

[90] Khilā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Obstructions, V.167

[91] Mala Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Stain, V.167

[92] Nighā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Pains, V.167

[93] Vedanā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Feelings, V.167

[94] Taṇhā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Craving, V.167

94.2 Tasinā or Taṇhā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Thirst, V.167

X. Ogha Vagga: Viveka, V. 191

Covering suttas 95-104. The buddha explains how the Four Settings-up of Memory are to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of the floods, the bonds, yokes to rebirth, ties to the body, risidual inclinations, sense pleasures, diversions, the fuel stockpiles, the yokes to lower rebirths, the yokes to higher rebirths.

PTS: The Flood, V.167
WP: Floods, II. 1666

 

[95] Ogha Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: The Flood, V.167
WP: 95-104: Floods, Higher Fetters, II. 1666

[96] Yoga Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Bond, V.167

[97] Upādāna Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Grasping, V.167

[98] Ganthā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: (Bodily) Ties, V.167

[99] Anusayā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Tendency, V.167

[100] Kāmaguṇa Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: The Sense-Pleasures, V.167

[101] Nivaraṇāni Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Hindrances, V.167

[102] Khandā Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: Factors, V.167

[103] Orambhāgiya Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: The Lower Set (of Fetters), V.167

[104] Uddhambhāgiya Suttaɱ, V. 191

PTS: The Higher Set (of Fetters), V.167


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Maggasamyutta]  [Bojjhangasamyutta]  [Satipatthanasamyutta]  [Indriyasamyutta]  [Sammappadhanasamyutta]  [Balasamyutta]  [Iddhipadasamyutta]  [Anuruddhasamyutta]  [Jhanasamyutta]  [Anapanasamyutta]  [Sotapattisamyutta]  [Saccasamyutta]

 


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement