Indexes Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Index to the Suttas of the Saɱyutta Nikāya
Mahā Vagga
Sotapatti Saɱyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

V. Mahā Vagga

PTS: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1898. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Great Chapter, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Great Book, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight,
BD: The translations of M. Olds.

XI. Sotāpatti Saɱyutta, V.342

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on Stream-Winning, V.296
WP: Connected Discourses on Stream-Entry, II.1788

I. Veḷudvāra Vagga, V.342

[1] Rājā Suttaɱ, V.342

Although a Wheel-Turning King conquers the world and after death his immediate rebirth is in the Heaven of the Three and Thirty Gods, he has not escaped rebirth as an animal, deamon or in hell, whereas a disciple of the Buddha, if he have faith in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha and is of virtuous character has escaped for all time these low rebirths.

PTS: Rajah, V.296
WP: Wheel-Turning Monarch, II.1788
ATI: The Emperor, Bhk. Thanissaro, trns.

[2] Ogadha or Saṭayhaɱ Suttaɱ, V.343

Four things which are attributes of a Streamwinner.

PTS: Steeped in, V.298
WP: Grounded, II.1789

[3] Dīghāvu Upāsaka Suttaɱ V.344

The Buddha visits the dying lay disciple Dighavu and instructs him first in attaining Stream-entry and then in attaining Non-returning. He is declared by the Buddha to have been spontaneously reborn in a location from whence he will not return to this world.

PTS: Dīghāvu, V.298
WP: Dighavu, II.1790

[4] Paṭhama Sāriputta Suttaɱ, V.346

Sariputta explains to Ananda the four essential things required of the Streamwinner.

PTS: Sāriputta (a), V.301
WP: Sariputta, II.1791

[5] Dutiya Sāriputta Suttaɱ, V.347

The Buddha questions Sariputta about various sayings concerning the dimensions of Streamwinning, the stream, and the streamwinner.

PTS: Sāriputta (b), V.302
WP: Sariputta 2, II.1792

[6] Thapatayo Suttaɱ, V.348

Isidatta and Purana describe their affection for the Buddha and he praises their faith and generosity in a way that suggests to them that they are Streamwinners.
Both Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi describe these two as 'chamberlains'. Woodward, in a footnote suggests 'equeries' which comes closer to how the duties of these two are described. They were in charge of maintenance and preparation for use and assisted in the actual mounting of the royal conveyances (horses, elephants, chariots). The actual term means 'chariot builder' which could be interpreted as 'in charge of conveyances.' They were close enough to the king (Passanadi) to sleep in his chamber on at least one occasion which is a possible justification for calling them chamberlains but in the description of the episode in which this happens it looks like it was specially contrived and not a usual procedure.

PTS: The Chamberlains, V.303
WP: The Chamberlains, II.1793

[7] Veḷudvāreyyā Suttaɱ, V.352

The people of Bamboo Gate ask the Buddha for a teaching that will bring them a house full of kids, pleasant sense-experiences and rebirth in heavon. The Buddha gives them a course of instruction that leads to Stream-winning.

PTS: Those of Bamboo Gate, V.307
WP: The People of Bamboo Gate, II.1796

[8] Paṭhama Giñjakāvasatha Suttaɱ, V.356

Ananda asks the Buddha about the destiny of some individuals who have died. He is told of their destinies and is given a teaching whereby individuals may determine for themselves that they have attained Stream-entry.

PTS: Brick Hall (a), V.311
WP: The Brick Hall, II.1799

[9] Dutiya Giñjakāvasatha Suttaɱ, V.358

Ananda asks the Buddha about the destiny of some individuals who have died. He is told of their destinies and is given a teaching whereby individuals may determine for themselves that they have attained Stream-entry.

PTS: Brick Hall (b), V.313
WP: The Brick Hall 2, II.1801

[10] Tatiya Giñjakāvasatha Suttaɱ, V.358

Ananda asks the Buddha about the destiny of some individuals who have died. He is told of their destinies and is given a teaching whereby individuals may determine for themselves that they have attained Stream-entry.

PTS: Brick Hall (c), V.313
WP: The Brick Hall 3, II.1801

II. Sahassaka- or Rājakārama Vagga, V.360

[11] Sahassa Suttaɱ, V.360

The Buddha teaches a thousand bhikkhunis the four criteria for determining Stream entry.

PTS: Thousand, V.314
WP: The Thousand, II.1802

[12] Brāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, V.361

The Buddha contrasts his four criteria for attaining stream entry with a Brahmin doctrine for attaining a heavonly rebirth.

PTS: Brahmins, V.315
WP: The Brahmins, II.1802

[13] Ānanda Suttaɱ, V.362

Ananda and Sariputta discuss what does and what does not lead a person to Stream-winning.

PTS: Ānanda, V.316
WP: Ananda, II.1803

[14] Paṭhama Duggati Suttaɱ, V.364

Possessed of four things one is assured of never again being reborn in Hell or states lower than human birth and of attaining awakening.

PTS: The Woeful Way (a), V.317
WP: Bad Destination, II.1805

[15] Dutiya Duggati Suttaɱ, V.364

Possessed of four things one never again need fear such an outcome as being reborn in Hell or states lower than human birth and one is assured of attaining awakening.

PTS: The Woeful Way (b), V.317
WP: Bad Destination 2, II.1805

[16] Paṭhama Mittenāmaccā Suttaɱ, V.364

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that they should teach the four limbs of Streamwinning to their friends, kith and kin, for whom they feel kindness of heart, who have a mind to listen to them.
One needs to walk a fine line when teaching Dhamma. One must balance the certain knowledge that Dhamma would be of value to anyone with the understanding that to try and push understanding on someone will have adverse results. The simplest formula is to refrain from teaching except in response to questions or to clear signals of interest. It is permissable however, given sufficient perception of likely understanding, to initiate discussion. The main idea is to avoid any hint of external pressure and internal anxiety for fame and fortune. In this sutta the boarder is deliniated by the idea that one should teach where one has kindly feelings towards the other and where the other is one with a predisposition to listen carefully to what you have to say.

PTS: Intimate Friends (a), V.317
WP: Friends and Colleagues, II.1805

[17] Dutiya Mittenāmaccā Suttaɱ, V.365

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that they should teach the four limbs of Streamwinning to their friends, kith and kin, for whom they feel kindness of heart, who have a mind to listen to them. Then he assures them that one with any one of the four limbs of Streamwinning is immune from rebirth as an animal, ghost, or in Hell.
Here the thing to note is the idea that each of the limbs of stremwinning encompasses the others.

PTS: Intimate Friends (b), V.318
WP: Friends and Colleagues 2, II.1806

[18] Paṭhama Devacārika Suttaɱ, V.366

Maha Moggallana visits the Gods of the Three and Thirty and praises the four limbs of Stream-winning.
Here we have an example of how the four limbs of Stream-winning should be taught. Note that there is no discussion of such things as the Four Truths or the Paticca Samuppada. The teaching is the simple statement that to have faith in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha and to have ethical behavior that is admired by the Aristocrats will result in rebirth in a godly realm. Implicit is the expectation that someone interested in such an outcome will investigate further. Question. And by that give scope to a response by a capable teacher.
You have to read the fine print in these contracts! Behavior not approved of by the Aristocrats constitutes lack of faith in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha. You need to understand the subtle differences between today's understanding of moral behavior as compared to that of the ethical conduct of the Buddha's Dhamma. For more on this, see: Understanding the Distinctions between Kamma, Ethics, Morality, the Rules of the Sangha, and the Behavior Required of One Seeking Awakening and The Pali Line: Ethical Culture.

PTS: Visiting the Devas (a), V.318
WP: Visiting the Devas, II.1806

[19] Dutiya Devacārika Suttaɱ, V.367

Maha Moggallana visits the Gods of the Three and Thirty and praises the four limbs of Stream-winning.
Almost identical with the previous but changing 'are reborn' to 'have been reborn'. (Not noticed by Woodward, but changed for this version.)

PTS: Visiting the Devas (b), V.319
WP: Visiting the Devas 2, II.1807

[20] Tatiya Devacārika Suttaɱ, V.367

Maha Moggallana visits the Gods of the Three and Thirty and praises the four limbs of Stream-winning.
Almost identical with the previous but changing 'have been reborn' to 'are stream-winners, not doomed to the Downfall, assured, bound for enlightenment.' (Not noticed by Woodward, but changed for this version.)

PTS: Visiting the Devas (c), V.319
WP: Visiting the Devas 3, II.1807

III. Saraṇāni Vagga V.369

[21] Paṭhama Mahānāma Suttaɱ V.369

Because Mahanama is occasionally beset with sense-desires he is concerned about his future destiny. The Buddha tells him not to fear for he has long had faith, virtue, learning, the practice of letting go, and insight. His mind is likened to the butter in a crock of butter tossed into a pond where when the crock cracks open the butter rises to the surface.

PTS: Mahanama a, V.320
WP: Mahanama, II.1808
ATI: To Mahanama (1), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[22] Dutiya Mahānāma Suttaɱ V.371

Because Mahanama is occasionally beset with sense-desires he is concerned about his future destiny. The Buddha tells him not to fear for he has long had faith, virtue, learning, the practice of letting go, and insight. His mind is likened to a tree that is bent to an angle; when it is cut down, it falls in the direction of its bent.

PTS: Mahanama (b), V.321
WP: Mahanama 2, II.1809
ATI: To Mahanama (2), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[23] Godhā or Tatiya Mahānāma Suttaɱ, V.371

Mahanama and Godha debate whether the Streamwinner has three essential features or four. They bring the debate to the Buddha for resolution.

PTS: Godha or Mahanama (c), V.322
WP: Godha, II.1809
Discussion

[24] Paṭhama Sarakāni or Saraṇāni Suttaɱ, V.375

A lay disciple who has fallen away from the layman's training and who took to drink dies and is declared by the Buddha to be a Streamwinner. There is general consternation and confusion. The Buddha explains, giving a series of examples, the broad extent of possible factors leading to stream-wining.
A good sutta for those of us with, shall we say, some deficiencies in our practice. Still, the lowest possible criteria — being able to distinguish what is well said from what is not well said — is no easy matter and for effectiveness in attaining streamwinning (defined essentially as the certain and permanent escape from rebirth in hell, as a ghost or as an animal and eventual awakening) requires at least contact with the Dhamma, though it implies that having this ability and continually traveling on rejecting the badly said in favor of the well said one will eventually come upon Dhamma.

PTS: Sarakani or Saranani (a), V.323
WP: Sarakani, II.1811

[25] Dutiya Sarakāni or Saraṇāni Suttaɱ, V.378

A lay disciple who has fallen away from the layman's training and who took to drink dies and is declared by the Buddha to be a Streamwinner. There is general consternation and confusion. The Buddha explains, giving a series of examples, the broad extent of possible factors leading to stream-wining.
Almost identical to the previous but with an expanded list of streamwinners (more cases of non-returners), and a simile.

PTS: Sarakani or Saranani (b), V.326
WP: Sarakani 2, II.1813

[26] Paṭhama Dussilya or Anāthapiṇḍika Suttaɱ, V.380

Sariputta cures Anathapindika of a grievous illness by bringing him to conscious awareness of his attainment of the four dimensions of Streamwinning, his fulfilment of the Aristocratic Eight dimensional Way, and his consummate knowledge and freedom.
This is the Buddhist method of 'working cures'. It is generally not recommended that the bhikkhus work cures in that beings have their kamma to work out, but here and there we see it being done. In this case it appears to have been only a temporary reprieve, presumably to give Anathapindika time to develop somewhat beyond this point. Here he is securely fixed in the position of Streamwinner. He ends as a non-returner.
Note the Buddha's final statement where he indicates that the four dimensions of streamwinning are the equivalent of the Eightfold Path plus knowledge and freedom.

PTS: Immoral or Anāthapiṇḍika (a), V.329
WP: Anāthapiṇḍika, II.1816

[27] Dutiya Dussilya or Anāthapiṇḍika Suttaɱ, V.385

Ananda visits Anathapindika when he is sick and reviews with him the four dimensions of streamwinning.

PTS: Immoral or Anathapindika (b), V.332
WP: Anāthapiṇḍika 2, II.1819

[28] Duvera or Tatiya Anāthapiṇḍika Suttaɱ, V.387

The Buddha gives Anathapindika a complete course in attaining Stream-entry.

PTS: Guilty Dread or Anāthapiṇḍika (c), V.333
BD: Stream-entry: Eliminating Dread, Mastering the Four Dimensions, Penetrating the Method, Declaring Intent Olds, trans.
WP: Fearful Animosities 1 or Anāthapiṇḍika 3, II.1820

[29] Bhaya or Bhikkhu Suttaɱ, V.389

The Buddha gives a number of bhikkhus a complete course in attaining Stream-entry.

PTS: Fear or The Monk, V.335
WP: Fearful Animosities 2, II.1820

[30] Licchavi or Nandaka Suttaɱ, V.389

The Buddha gives an inspiring talk to Nandaka the minister of the Licchavi on Stream Entry.
This sutta is notable for the insertion in the description of the benefits of stream-entry the idea that such also brings both earthly and heavenly long life, beauty, happiness, good name, and sovereignty.

PTS: Licchavi or Nandaka, V.335
WP: The Licchavi, II.1821
ATI: To the Licchavi, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

IV. Puññabhisanda Vaggo V.391

[31] Paṭhama Abhisanda Suttaɱ, V.391

A sutta describing the flood of good consquences following from trust in the Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha and the ethical standards of the Aristocrats.

PTS: Flood (a), V.336
WP: Streams, II.1821
ATI: Bonanzas (1), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[32] Dutiya Abhisanda Suttaɱ, V.391

The Buddha describes four facets of stream-entry as four overflowing benefits.
Here only the first three of the four dimensions of stream-entry are given with a description of generosity as a fourth.

PTS: Flood (b), V.337
WP: Streams 2, II.1822
ATI: Bonanzas (2), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[33] Tatiya Abhisanda Suttaɱ, V.392

The Buddha describes four facets of stream-entry as four overflowing benefits.
Here only the first three of the four dimensions of stream-entry are given with a description of the insight into the rise and fall of things which is had by the Streamwinner as a fourth.

PTS: Flood (c), V.337
WP: Streams 3, II.1822
ATI: Bonanzas (3), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[34] Paṭhama Devapada Suttaɱ, V.392

The Buddha describes the four dimensions of stream-entry as the path to the deva worlds.

PTS: The Path to the Devas (a), V.337
WP: Divine Tracks, II.1823

[35] Dutiya Devapada Suttaɱ, V.391

The Buddha describes the four dimensions of stream-entry as the path to the deva worlds.
This sutta differs from the previous in the addition of awareness in the bhikkhu that he has because of his development found the path to the devas.

PTS: The Path to the Devas (b), V.338
WP: Divine Tracks 2, II.1823

[36] Sabhāgata Suttaɱ, V.394

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that the devas delight in the similarity to themselves of one who has the four dimensions of stream-entry.
Bhk. Bodhi notes that Woodward has misunderstood a term here which results in a translation essentially unsupported by the material that follows. I have provided Bhk. Bodhi's note which explains, and I give an abridged example of his construction of the sutta.

PTS: Joined the Company, V.338
WP: Similar to the Devas, II.1824

[37] Mahānāma Suttaɱ, V.395

Mahanama receives answers to his qestions about what constitutes a disciple, faith, ethical conduct, generosity and wisdom.

PTS: Mahānāma, V.338
WP: Mahanama, II.1824

[38] Vassa Suttaɱ, V.396

The Buddha likens the way rain on the mountains flows down filling the streams, lakes and rivers and empties into the Ocean to the way the person with faith in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha and who possesses the ethical behavior of the Aristocrat gradually develops arahantship.

PTS: Raining, V.339
WP: Rain, II.1825

[39] Kāligodhā Suttaɱ, V.396

The Buddha teaches The Four Dimensions of Streamwinning to Kaligodha, tbe Sakyan lady who declares that she is possessed of these four. The Buddha congratulates her and tells her she has declared Streamwinning.

PTS: Kāḷi, V.340
WP: Kaligodha, II.1826

[40] Nandiya Suttaɱ, V.397

The Buddha defines the 'puthujjana', the disciple that lives carelessly and the disciple that lives carefully.
There is a habit among some bhikkhus weak themselves in knowledge of the Dhamma, eager for some indication of their superiority to the rest of the world, not adverse to insulting others to class anyone not an ordained bhikkhu as a 'puthujjana,' 'commoner'. Here in this sutta we can see that this term is to be applied only to those with absolutely no belief in the Buddha or his system. Those who do have belief but whose knowledge and practice falls short are called 'ariyasāvako pamāda-vihārī' 'disciples who live carelessly'. Just having heard the idea that there is such a thing as awakening is a huge step in the right direction, any sort of faith in the Buddha and his teachings as being the way to attain that awakening should be respected as such.

PTS: Nandiya, V.340
WP: Nandiya, II.1826
ATI: To Nandiya, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

V. Sagātha-Puññā-Bhisanda Vagga, V.399

[41] Paṭhama Abhisanda or Sahaka or Asaŋkheyya Suttaɱ, V.399

The Buddha speaks about how difficult it is to calculate the benefits of being blessed with the four dimensions of Stream-entry.
Here the verses at the end seem to detract from the point of the sutta in that they suggest that it is the fact that the Stream-enterer is generous to the Sangha that brings about his merit while the message of the sutta is that it is the attaining of the four dimensions themselves that is the basis of his merit.

PTS: Flood or Capacious (a), V.342
WP: Streams of Merit, II.1828

[42] Dutiya Abhisanda or Sahaka or Asaŋkheyya Suttaɱ, V.401

The Buddha speaks about how difficult it is to calculate the benefits of being blessed with four factors.

PTS: Flood or Capacious (b), V.343
WP: Streams of Merit 2, II.1829

[43] Tatiya Abhisanda or Sahaka or Asaŋkheyya Suttaɱ, V.401

The Buddha speaks about how difficult it is to calculate the benefits of being blessed with four factors.

PTS: Flood or Capacious (c), V.344
WP: Streams of Merit 3, II.1830

[44] Paṭhama Mahāddhana or Aḍḍha Suttaɱ, V.402

The Buddha calls a person possessing the four dimensions of Stream-entry very rich, of great possessions.

PTS: Very Rich or Wealthy (a), V.345
WP: Rich, II.1830

[45] Dutiya Mahāddhana or Aḍḍha Suttaɱ, V.402

The Buddha calls a person possessing the four dimensions of Stream-entry very rich, of great possessions, of great fame.

PTS: Very Rich (b), V.345
WP: Rich 2, II.1830

[46] Bhikkhū or Suddaka Suttaɱ, V.403

The Buddha defines Stream-entry for the bhikkhus in it's most fundamental form.

PTS: Monks, or Puritan, V.345
WP: Simple Version, II.1831

[47] Nandiya Suttaɱ, V.403

The Buddha defines Stream-entry for Nandia the Sakyan.

PTS: Nandiya, V.345
WP: Nandiya, II.1831

[48] Bhaddiya Suttaɱ, V.403

The Buddha defines Stream-entry for Bhaddiya the Sakyan.

PTS: Bhaddiya, V.345
WP: Bhaddiya, II.1831

[49] Mahānāma Suttaɱ, V.404

The Buddha defines Stream-entry for Mahanama the Sakyan.

PTS: Mahānāma V.345
WP: Mahānāma, II.1831

[50] Aŋga Suttaɱ, V.404

Four dimensions of Stream-entry.
A completely different set of 'aŋgas' than is found in, for example, SN 5.28. Which tells us that we should not consider 'The Four Dimensions of Stream-entry" (cattāri sotāpattiy-aŋgāni) as a title of a fixed set, but only as a way of distinguishing four of many dimensions that make a set that will lead to Stream-entry.

PTS: Limb, V.345
WP: Factors, II.1831

VI. Sappañña Vagga V.404

[51] Sagāthaka Suttaɱ, V.404

Blessed with these four things the Disciple of the Buddha is a Stream-enterer.

PTS: With Verses, V.346
WP: With Verses, II.1832

[52] Vassavuttha Suttaɱ, V.405

A bhikkhu reports on his experiences living near the Buddha during a rainy season.
Very interesting from the point of view of getting a glympse of the way news was passed along in the days of the Buddha.

PTS: Spending the Rainy Season, V.346
WP: One Who Spent the Rains, II.1832

[53] Dhammadinna Suttaɱ, V.406

Dhammadinna brings his 500 followers to the Buddha for a Dhamma lesson.
In an interesting footnote Woodward quotes commentary which refers to Samyuttas as Suttantas: 'collections,' which, of course, they are. The importance of this is in understanding the nature of those 'suttas' called 'suttanta' in the Digha and Majjhima.

PTS: Dhammadinna, V.347
WP: Dhammadinna, II.1833

[54] Gilāyanaɱ Suttaɱ, V.408

The Buddha explains to Anathapindika how one should speak to a disciple of the Buddha who is suffering an illness likely to lead to death.
The qualification indicates that this approach should probably not be taken with an unconverted individual.

PTS: Visiting the Sick, V.349
WP: Ill, II.1834
ATI: Ill

[55] Paṭhama Caturo Phalā Suttaɱ, V.410

Four things which lead to stream-entry: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Four Fruits (a), V.351
WP: The Fruit of Stream-Entry, II.1836

[56] Dutiya Caturo Phalā Suttaɱ, V.411

Four things which lead to once-returning: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Four Fruits (b), V.351
WP: The Fruit of Once-Returning, II.1836

[57] Tatiya Caturo Phalā Suttaɱ, V.411

Four things which lead to non-returning: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Four Fruits (c), V.351
WP: The Fruit of Non-returning, II.1836

[58] Catuttha Caturo Phalā Suttaɱ, V.411

Four things which lead to Arahantship: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Four Fruits (d), V.351
WP: The Fruit of Arahantship, II.1836

[59] Paññā-Paṭilābho Suttaɱ, V.411

Four things which lead to acquiring wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Acquiring Insight, V.351
WP: The Obtaining of Wisdom, II.1837

[60] Paññā-Vuḍḍhi Suttaɱ, V.411

Four things which lead to growing wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Growth of Insight, V.351
WP: The Growth of Wisdom, II.1837

[61] Paññā-Vepullata Suttaɱ, V.411

Four things which lead to increasing wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Increase of Insight, V.351
WP: The Expansion of Wisdom, II.1837

VII. Mahā-Paññā Vagga V.412

[62] Mahā-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to great wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Comprehensive Insight, V.351
WP: Greatness of Wisdom, II.1837

[63] Puthu-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to broad wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Manifold Insight, V.351
WP: 63-74: Extensiveness of Wisdom, Etc, II.1837

[64] Vipula-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to bountiful wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Extensive Insight, V.351

[65] Gambhīra-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to profound wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Profound Insight, V.351

[66] Appamatta-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to immeasurable wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Unbounded Insight, V.351

[67] Bhūri-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to world-wide wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Abundant Insight, V.351

[68] Paññā-bahula Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to wisdom a-plenty: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Many-sided Insight, V.351

[69] Sīgha-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to swift wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Swift Insight, V.351

[70] Lahu-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to easy wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Buoyant Insight, V.351

[71] Hāsa or Hāsu-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to good humored wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Joyous Insight, V.351

[72] Javana-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to spontaneous wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Instant Insight, V.351

[73] Tikkha-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to sharp wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Sharp Insight, V.351

[74] Nibbedhika-Paññā Suttaɱ, V.412

Four things which lead to penetrating wisdom: companionship with good men, listening to Dhamma, tracing things in mind to their points of origin, and walking in the footsteps of the Dhamma in the Dhamma.

PTS: Fastidious Insight, V.351


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Maggasamyutta]  [Bojjhangasamyutta]  [Satipatthanasamyutta]  [Indriyasamyutta]  [Sammappadhanasamyutta]  [Balasamyutta]  [Iddhipadasamyutta]  [Anuruddhasamyutta]  [Jhanasamyutta]  [Anapanasamyutta]  [Sotapattisamyutta]  [Saccasamyutta]

 


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement