Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
4. Catukkanipāto
IV. Cakka Vaggo

Sutta 37

Aparihani Sutta

No Falling Away

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
For free distribution only.

 


 

[1][pts][bodh] "Endowed with four qualities,
a monk is incapable of falling away
and is right in the presence of Unbinding.

Which four?

"There is the case where a monk is consummate in virtue,
guards the doors to his sense faculties,
knows moderation in eating, and
is devoted to wakefulness.

"And how is a monk consummate in virtue?

There is the case where a monk is virtuous.
He dwells restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha,
consummate in his behavior and
sphere of activity.
He trains himself,
having undertaken the training rules,
seeing danger in the slightest faults.

This is how a monk is consummate in virtue.

"And how does a monk guard the doors to his sense faculties?

There is the case where a monk,
on seeing a form with the eye,
does not grasp at any theme or variations by which
— if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the eye —
evil, unskillful qualities
such as greed or distress
might assail him.

He practices with restraint.

He guards the faculty of the eye.

He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the eye.

"On hearing a sound with the ear...

"On smelling an aroma with the nose...

"On tasting a flavor with the tongue...

"On feeling a tactile sensation with the body...

"On cognizing an idea with the intellect,
he does not grasp at any theme or variations by which
— if he were to dwell without restraint over the faculty of the intellect —
evil, unskillful qualities
such as greed or distress might assail him.

He practices with restraint.

He guards the faculty of the intellect.

He achieves restraint with regard to the faculty of the intellect.

This is how a monk guards the doors to his sense faculties.

"And how does a monk know moderation in eating?

There is the case where a monk,
considering it appropriately,
takes his food not playfully,
nor for intoxication,
nor for putting on bulk,
nor for beautification,
but simply for the survival and continuance of this body,
for ending its afflictions,
for the support of the holy life, thinking,
'I will destroy old feelings [of hunger]
and not create new feelings [from overeating].
Thus I will maintain myself,
be blameless,
and live in comfort.'

This is how a monk knows moderation in eating.

"And how is a monk devoted to wakefulness?

There is the case where a monk during the day,
sitting and pacing back and forth,
cleanses his mind of any qualities
that would hold the mind in check.

During the first watch of the night [dusk to 10 p.m.],
sitting and pacing back and forth,
he cleanses his mind of any qualities
that would hold the mind in check.

During the second watch of the night [10 p.m. to 2 a.m.],
reclining on his right side,
he takes up the lion's posture,
one foot placed on top of the other,
mindful, alert,
with his mind set on getting up
[either as soon as he awakens or at a particular time].

During the last watch of the night [2 a.m. to dawn],
sitting and pacing back and forth,
he cleanses his mind of any qualities
that would hold the mind in check.

This is how a monk is devoted to wakefulness.

"Endowed with these four qualities,
a monk is incapable of falling away
and is right in the presence of Unbinding."

The monk established in virtue,
restrained with regard to the sense faculties,
knowing moderation in food,
and devoted to wakefulness:
    dwelling thus ardently,
    day and night, untiring,
    he develops skillful qualities
    for the attainment of rest from the yoke.
The monk delighting in heedfulness
and seeing danger in heedlessness
is incapable of falling away,
is right in the presence of Unbinding.

 


 

See also: Dhp 21-32
Dhp 315
Snp II.10
SN III.17.

 


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