Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikaya
Pañcaka-Nipāta
XX. Brāhmaṇa Vaggo

Sutta 200

Nissaraniya Sutta

Leading to Escape

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
For free distribution only.

 


 

[1][pts] "Five properties lead to escape.

Which five?

"There is the case where the mind of a monk, when attending to sensual pleasures, doesn't leap up at sensual pleasures, doesn't grow confident, steadfast, or released in sensual pleasures. But when attending to renunciation, his mind leaps up at renunciation, grows confident, steadfast, and released in renunciation. When his mind is rightly-gone, rightly developed, has rightly risen above, gained release, and become disjoined from sensual pleasures, then whatever fermentations, torments, and fevers there are that arise in dependence on sensuality, he is released from them. He does not experience that feeling. This is expounded as the escape from sensual pleasures.

"Furthermore, there is the case where the mind of a monk, when attending to ill will, doesn't leap up at ill will, doesn't grow confident, steadfast, or released in ill will. But when attending to non-ill will, his mind leaps up at non-ill will, grows confident, steadfast, and released in non-ill will. When his mind is rightly-gone, rightly developed, has rightly risen above, gained release, and become disjoined from ill will, then whatever fermentations, torments, and fevers there are that arise in dependence on ill will, he is released from them. He does not experience that feeling. This is expounded as the escape from ill will.

"Furthermore, there is the case where the mind of a monk, when attending to harmfulness, doesn't leap up at harmfulness, doesn't grow confident, steadfast, or released in harmfulness. But when attending to harmlessness, his mind leaps up at harmlessness, grows confident, steadfast, and released in harmlessness. When his mind is rightly-gone, rightly developed, has rightly risen above, gained release, and become disjoined from harmfulness, then whatever fermentations, torments, and fevers there are that arise in dependence on harmfulness, he is released from them. He does not experience that feeling. This is expounded as the escape from harmfulness.

"Furthermore, there is the case where the mind of a monk, when attending to forms, doesn't leap up at forms, doesn't grow confident, steadfast, or released in forms. But when attending to the formless, his mind leaps up at the formless, grows confident, steadfast, and released in the formless. When his mind is rightly-gone, rightly developed, has rightly risen above, gained release, and become disjoined from forms, then whatever fermentations, torments, and fevers there are that arise in dependence on forms, he is released from them. He does not experience that feeling. This is expounded as the escape from forms.

"Furthermore, there is the case where the mind of a monk, when attending to self-identity, doesn't leap up at self-identity, doesn't grow confident, steadfast, or released in self-identity. But when attending to the cessation of self-identity, his mind leaps up at the cessation of self-identity, grows confident, steadfast, and released in the cessation of self-identity. When his mind is rightly-gone, rightly developed, has rightly risen above, gained release, and become disjoined from self-identity, then whatever fermentations, torments, and fevers there are that arise in dependence on self-identity, he is released from them. He does not experience that feeling. This is expounded as the escape from self-identity. Delight in sensuality does not obsess him. Delight in ill will does not obsess him. Delight in harmfulness does not obsess him. Delight in form does not obsess him. Delight in self-identity does not obsess him. From the lack of any obsession with sensuality, the lack of any obsession with ill will... to harmfulness... to form... to self-identity, he is called a monk without attachment. He has cut through craving, has turned away from the fetter, and by rightly breaking through conceit he has put an end to suffering and stress.

"These are the five properties that lead to escape."

 


 

See also: AN VI.13

 


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