Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikaya
Sattakanipata

Sutta 58

Capala Sutta

Nodding

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
Provenance, terms and conditons

 


 

[1][pts][bd] Once the Blessed One was living among the Bhaggas
in the Deer Park at Bhesaka'a Grove,
near Crocodile Haunt.

At that time Ven. Maha Moggallana[1] sat nodding
near the village of Kallavalaputta,
in Magadha.

The Blessed One,
with his purified divine eye,
surpassing the human,
saw Ven. Maha Moggallana
as he sat nodding
near the village of Kallavalaputta,
in Magadha.

As soon as he saw this
— just as a strong man
might extend his flexed arm
or flex his extended arm —
he disappeared from among the Bhaggas
in the Deer Park at Bhesaka'a Grove,
near Crocodile Haunt,
and re-appeared
near the village of Kallavalaputta,
in Magadha,
right in front of Ven. Maha Moggallana.
There he sat down on a prepared seat.
As he was sitting there,
the Blessed One said to Ven. Maha Moggallana,

"Are you nodding, Moggallana?
Are you nodding?"

"Yes, lord."

[2][pts][bd] "Well then, Moggallana,
whatever perception you have in mind
when drowsiness descends on you,
don't attend to that perception,
don't pursue it.
It's possible
that by doing this
you will shake off your drowsiness.

[3][pts][bd] "But if by doing this
you don't shake off your drowsiness,
then recall to your awareness
the Dhamma as you have heard and memorized it,
re-examine it and
ponder it over in your mind.
It's possible
that by doing this
you will shake off your drowsiness.

[4][pts][bd] "But if by doing this
you don't shake off your drowsiness,
then repeat aloud in detail
the Dhamma as you have heard and memorized it.
It's possible
that by doing this
you will shake off your drowsiness.

[5][pts][bd] "But if by doing this
you don't shake off your drowsiness,
then pull both you earlobes
and rub your limbs with your hands.
It's possible
that by doing this
you will shake off your drowsiness.

[6][pts][bd] "But if by doing this
you don't shake off your drowsiness,
then get up from your seat and,
after washing your eyes out with water,
look around in all directions
and upward to the major stars and constellations.
It's possible
that by doing this
you will shake off your drowsiness.

[7][pts][bd] "But if by doing this
you don't shake off your drowsiness,
then attend to the perception of light,
resolve on the perception of daytime,
[dwelling] by night as by day,
and by day as by night.
By means of an awareness
thus open and unhampered,
develop a brightened mind.
It's possible
that by doing this
you will shake off your drowsiness.

[8][pts][bd] "But if by doing this
you don't shake off your drowsiness,
then — percipient of what lies in front and behind —
set a distance to meditate
walking back and forth,
your senses inwardly immersed,
your mind not straying outwards.
It's possible
that by doing this
you will shake off your drowsiness.

[9][pts][bd] "But if by doing this
you don't shake off your drowsiness,
then — reclining on your right side —
take up the lion's posture,
one foot placed on top of the other,
mindful, alert,
with your mind set on getting up.
As soon as you wake up,
get up quickly,
with the thought,
'I won't stay indulging
in the pleasure of lying down,
the pleasure of reclining,
the pleasure of drowsiness.'
That is how you should train yourself.

[10][pts][bd] "Furthermore, Moggallana,
should you train yourself:
'I will not visit families
with my pride[2] lifted high.'
That is how you should train yourself.

Among families there are many jobs
that have to be done,
so that people don't pay attention
to a visiting monk.
If a monk visits them
with his trunk lifted high,
the thought will occur to him,
'Now who, I wonder,
has caused a split
between me and this family?
The people seem to have no liking for me.'
Getting nothing,
he becomes abashed.
Abashed, he becomes restless.
Restless, he becomes unrestrained.
Unrestrained,
his mind is far from concentration.

"Furthermore, Moggallana,
should you train yourself:
'I will speak no confrontational speech.'
That is how you should train yourself.

When there is confrontational speech,
a lot of discussion can be expected.
When there is a lot of discussion,
there is restlessness.
One who is restless
becomes unrestrained.
Unrestrained,
his mind is far from concentration.

"It's not the case, Moggallana,
that I praise association of every sort.
But it's not the case
that I dispraise association of every sort.
I don't praise association
with householders and renunciates.
But as for dwelling places
that are free from noise,
free from sound,
their atmosphere devoid of people,
appropriately secluded
for resting undisturbed by human beings:
I praise association
with dwelling places of this sort."

[11][pts][bd] When this was said,
Ven. Moggallana said to the Blessed One:
"Briefly, lord,
in what respect is a monk released
through the ending of craving,
utterly complete,
utterly free from bonds,
a follower of the utterly holy life,
utterly consummate:
foremost among human and heavenly beings?"

"There is the case, Moggallana,
where a monk has heard,
'All phenomena are unworthy of attachment.'
Having heard that
all phenomena are unworthy of attachment,
he fully knows all things.
Fully knowing all things,
he fully comprehends all things.
Fully comprehending all things,
then whatever feeling he experiences
— pleasure, pain, neither pleasure nor pain —
he remains focused on inconstancy,
focused on dispassion,
focused on cessation,
focused on relinquishing
with regard to that feeling.
As he remains focused on inconstancy,
focused on dispassion,
focused on cessation,
focused on relinquishing
with regard to that feeling,
he is unsustained by[3]
anything in the world.
Unsustained, he is not agitated.
Unagitated, he is unbound right within.
He discerns:
'Birth is ended,
the holy life fulfilled,
the task done.
There is nothing further for this world.'

"It is in this respect, Moggallana,
that a monk,
in brief,
is released through the ending of craving,
utterly complete,
utterly free from bonds,
a follower of the utterly holy life,
utterly consummate:
foremost among human and heavenly beings."

 


[1] Prior to his Awakening.

[2] Literally, "my trunk" (i.e., an elephant's trunk).

[3] Does not cling to.

 


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