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Saŋyutta Nikaya
2. Nidāna Vagga
12. Nidāna Saŋyutta
3. Dasabala Vagga

Sutta 25

Bhumija Sutta

To Bhumija

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
Provenance, terms and conditons

 


 

[1][pts][bodh] Staying at Savatthi.

Then Ven. Bhumija, arising from his seclusion in the late afternoon, went to Ven. Sariputta. On arrival, he exchanged courteous greetings with him. After an exchange of friendly greetings and courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to Ven. Sariputta, "Friend Sariputta, there are some priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are self-made. There are other priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are other-made. Then there are other priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are self-made and other-made. And then there are still other priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are neither self-made nor other-made, but arise spontaneously. In this case, friend Sariputta, what is the Blessed One's doctrine? What does he teach? Answering in what way will I speak in line with what the Blessed One has said, not misrepresent the Blessed One with what is unfactual, and answer in line with the Dhamma so that no one whose thinking is in line with the Dhamma will have grounds for criticism?"

"The Blessed One, my friend, has said that pleasure and pain are dependently co-arisen. Dependent on what? Dependent on contact. One speaking in this way would be speaking in line with what the Blessed One has said, would not be misrepresenting the Blessed One with what is unfactual, and would be answering in line with the Dhamma so that no one whose thinking is in line with the Dhamma would have grounds for criticism.

"Whatever priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are self-made, even that is dependent on contact. Whatever priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are other-made, even that is dependent on contact. Whatever priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are self-made and other-made, even that is dependent on contact. Whatever priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are neither self-made nor other-made, but arise spontaneously, even that is dependent on contact.

"That any priests and contemplatives — teachers of kamma who declare that pleasure and pain are self-made — would be sensitive to pleasure and pain otherwise than through contact: that isn't possible. That any priests and contemplatives — teachers of kamma who declare that pleasure and pain are other-made... self-made and other-made... who declare that pleasure and pain are neither self-made nor other-made, but arise spontaneously — would be sensitive to pleasure and pain otherwise than through contact: that isn't possible."

Now it so happened that Ven. Ananda overheard this conversation between Ven. Sariputta and Ven. Bhumija. Then he went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he reported the entire conversation to the Blessed One.

[The Blessed One said:] "Excellent, Ananda. Excellent. One rightly answering would answer as Ven. Sariputta has done.

"I have said, Ananda, that pleasure and pain are dependently co-arisen. Dependent on what? Dependent on contact. One speaking in this way would be speaking in line with what I have said, would not be misrepresenting me with what is unfactual, and would be answering in line with the Dhamma so that no one whose thinking is in line with the Dhamma would have grounds for criticism.

"Whatever priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are self-made, even that is dependent on contact. Whatever priests and contemplatives, teachers of kamma, who declare that pleasure and pain are other-made... self-made and other-made... neither self-made nor other-made, but arise spontaneously, even that is dependent on contact.

"That any priests and contemplatives — teachers of kamma who declare that pleasure and pain are self-made — would be sensitive to pleasure and pain otherwise than through contact: that isn't possible. That any priests and contemplatives — teachers of kamma who declare that pleasure and pain are other-made... self-made and other-made... neither self-made nor other-made, but arise spontaneously — would be sensitive to pleasure and pain otherwise than through contact: that isn't possible.

 


 

13. "When there is a body, pleasure and pain arise internally with bodily intention as the cause;
or when there is speech, pleasure and pain arise internally with verbal intention as the cause;
or when there is intellect, pleasure and pain arise internally with intellectual intention as the cause.

"From ignorance as requisite condition,
then either of one's own accord one fabricates bodily fabrication on account of which that pleasure and pain arise internally, or because of others one fabricates bodily fabrication on account of which that pleasure and pain arise internally.

Either alert one fabricates bodily fabrication on account of which that pleasure and pain arise internally, or unalert one fabricates bodily fabrication on account of which that pleasure and pain arise internally.

(Similarly with verbal and intellectual fabrications.)

"Now, ignorance is bound up in these things. From the remainderless fading and cessation of that very ignorance, there no longer exists [the sense of] the body on account of which that pleasure and pain internally arise. There no longer exists the speech... the intellect on account of which that pleasure and pain internally arise. There no longer exists the field, the site, the dimension, or the issue on account of which that pleasure and pain internally arise."

 


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