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Saɱyutta Nikāya
II. Nidāna Vagga
XII. Nidāna Saɱyutta
IV. Kaḷarakhattiyo Vagga

Sutta 31

Bhūta Suttaɱ

This Has Come Into Being

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
Provenance, terms and conditons

 


 

[1][pts][bodh] On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. There he addressed Ven. Sariputta,

"Sariputta, it is said in Ajita's Question in the Way to the Further Shore[1]:

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,
    those who are learners,
    those who are run-of-the-mill:
When you, dear sir, astute,
    are asked this,
tell me their manner of life.

"How is the detailed meaning of this brief statement to be understood?"

When this was said, Ven. Sariputta remained silent.

A second time... A third time the Blessed One addressed Ven. Sariputta,

"Sariputta, it is said in Ajita's Question in the Way to the Further Shore:

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,
    those who are learners,
    those who are run-of-the-mill:
When you, dear sir, astute,
    are asked this,
tell me their manner of life.

"How is the detailed meaning of this brief statement to be understood?"

A third time, Ven. Sariputta remained silent.

"Do you see, Sariputta, that 'this has come into being'?"

"One sees with right discernment, lord, that 'this has come into being.' Seeing with right discernment that 'this has come into being,' one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment.' Seeing with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment,' one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.' Seeing with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,' one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a learner.

"And how, lord, is one a person who has fathomed the Dhamma?

"One sees with right discernment, lord, that 'this has come into being.' Seeing with right discernment that 'this has come into being,' one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment.' Seeing with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment,' one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.' Seeing with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,' one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a person who has fathomed the Dhamma.

"It is in this way, lord, that I understand the detailed meaning of the brief statement in Ajita's Question in the Way to the Further Shore:

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,
    those who are learners,
    those who are run-of-the-mill:
When you, dear sir, astute,
    are asked this,
tell me their manner of life."

"Excellent, Sariputta. Excellent. One sees with right discernment that 'this has come into being.' Seeing with right discernment that 'this has come into being,' one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment.' Seeing with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment,' one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.' Seeing with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,' one practices for disenchantment with, for dispassion toward, for the cessation of what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a learner.

"And how is one a person who has fathomed the Dhamma?

"One sees with right discernment that 'this has come into being.' Seeing with right discernment that 'this has come into being,' one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment.' Seeing with right discernment that 'it has come into being from this nutriment,' one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from the nutriment by which it has come into being. One sees with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation.' Seeing with right discernment that 'from the cessation of this nutriment, what has come into being is subject to cessation,' one is — through disenchantment, dispassion, cessation, through lack of clinging/sustenance — released from what is subject to cessation. This is how one is a person who has fathomed the Dhamma.

"It is in this way that the detailed meaning of the brief statement in Ajita's Question in the Way to the Further Shore is to be understood:

Those here who have fathomed the Dhamma,
    those who are learners,
    those who are run-of-the-mill:
When you, dear sir, astute,
    are asked this,
tell me their manner of life."

 


[1] [Sn V.1]

 


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