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Saɱyutta Nikāya
III. Khandha Vagga
22. Khandhasaɱyutta

Sutta 84

Tissa Sutta

Tissa

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
Provenance, terms and conditons

 


 

[1][pts][olds][bodh] At Savatthi

On that occasion Ven. Tissa,
the Blessed One's paternal cousin,
told a large number of monks,
"Friends, it's as if my body is drugged.
I've lost my bearings.
Things aren't clear to me.
My mind keeps being overwhelmed
with sloth and torpor.
I lead the holy life dissatisfied.
I have uncertainty about the teachings."

Then a large number of monks
went to the Blessed One
and, on arrival,
having bowed down to him,
sat to one side.
As they were sitting there,
they told him:

"Lord, Ven. Tissa,
the Blessed One's paternal cousin,
has told a large number of monks,
'Friends, it's as if my body is drugged.
I've lost my bearings.
Things aren't clear to me.
My mind keeps being overwhelmed
with sloth and torpor.
I lead the holy life dissatisfied.
I have uncertainty about the teachings.'"

Then the Blessed One told a certain monk,

"Come, monk.
In my name, call Tissa, saying,
'The Teacher calls you, my friend.'"

"As you say, lord,"
the monk answered
and, having gone to Ven. Tissa,
on arrival he said,
"The Teacher calls you, my friend."

"As you say, my friend,"
Ven. Tissa replied.
Then he went to the Blessed One
and, on arrival,
having bowed down to him,
sat to one side.
As he was sitting there,
the Blessed One said to him,

"Is it true, Tissa,
that you have told a large number of monks,
'Friends, it's as if my body is drugged.
I've lost my bearings.
Things aren't clear to me.
My mind keeps being overwhelmed
with sloth and torpor.
I lead the holy life dissatisfied.
I have uncertainty about the teachings'?"

"Yes, lord."

"What do you think, Tissa:
In one who is not without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for form,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his form?"

"Yes, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is not without passion for form.

"What do you think, Tissa:
In one who is not without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for feeling,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his feeling?"

"Yes, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is not without passion for feeling.

"What do you think, Tissa:
In one who is not without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for perception,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his perception?"

"Yes, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is not without passion for perception.

"What do you think, Tissa:
In one who is not without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for fabrications,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his fabrications?"

"Yes, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is not without passion for fabrications.

"What do you think, Tissa:
In one who is not without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for consciousness,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his consciousness?"

"Yes, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is not without passion for consciousness.

"Now what do you think, Tissa:
In one who is without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for form,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his form?"

"No, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is without passion for form.

"Now what do you think, Tissa:
In one who is without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for feeling,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his feeling?"

"No, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is without passion for feeling.

"Now what do you think, Tissa:
In one who is without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for perception,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his perception?"

"No, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is without passion for perception.

"Now what do you think, Tissa:
In one who is without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for fabrications,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his fabrications?"

"No, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is without passion for fabrications.

"Now what do you think, Tissa:
In one who is without passion,
desire, love, thirst,
fever, and craving for consciousness,
does there arise sorrow, lamentation, pain,
distress, and despair
from change and alteration in his consciousness?"

"No, lord."

"Good, Tissa, good.
That's how it is for one
who is without passion for consciousness.

"What do you think, Tissa
— Is form constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"And is that which is inconstant
easeful or stressful?"

"Stressful, lord."

"'And is it fitting to regard
what is inconstant,
stressful,
subject to change as:
"This is mine.
This is my self.
This is what I am"?'

"No, lord."

"What do you think, Tissa
— Is feeling constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"And is that which is inconstant
easeful or stressful?"

"Stressful, lord."

"'And is it fitting to regard
what is inconstant,
stressful,
subject to change as:
"This is mine.
This is my self.
This is what I am"?'

"No, lord."

"What do you think, Tissa
— Is perception constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"And is that which is inconstant
easeful or stressful?"

"Stressful, lord."

"'And is it fitting to regard
what is inconstant,
stressful,
subject to change as:
"This is mine.
This is my self.
This is what I am"?'

"No, lord."

"What do you think, Tissa
— Are fabrications constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"And is that which is inconstant
easeful or stressful?"

"Stressful, lord."

"'And is it fitting to regard
what is inconstant,
stressful,
subject to change as:
"This is mine.
This is my self.
This is what I am"?'

"No, lord."

"What do you think, Tissa
— Is consciousness constant or inconstant?"

"Inconstant, lord."

"And is that which is inconstant
easeful or stressful?"

"Stressful, lord."

"'And is it fitting to regard
what is inconstant,
stressful,
subject to change as:
"This is mine.
This is my self.
This is what I am"?'

"No, lord."

"Thus, Tissa, any form whatsoever
that is past, future, or present;
internal or external;
blatant or subtle;
common or sublime;
far or near:
every form is to be seen
as it actually is
with right discernment as:
"This is not mine.
This is not my self.
This is not what I am."

"'Any feeling whatsoever
that is past, future, or present;
internal or external;
blatant or subtle;
common or sublime;
far or near:
every feeling is to be seen
as it actually is
with right discernment as:
"This is not mine.
This is not my self.
This is not what I am."

"'Any perception whatsoever
that is past, future, or present;
internal or external;
blatant or subtle;
common or sublime;
far or near:
every perception is to be seen
as it actually is
with right discernment as:
"This is not mine.
This is not my self.
This is not what I am."

"'Any fabrications whatsoever
that is past, future, or present;
internal or external;
blatant or subtle;
common or sublime;
far or near:
every fabrication is to be seen
as it actually is
with right discernment as:
"This is not mine.
This is not my self.
This is not what I am."

"'Any consciousness whatsoever
that is past, future, or present;
internal or external;
blatant or subtle;
common or sublime;
far or near:
every consciousness is to be seen
as it actually is
with right discernment as:
"This is not mine.
This is not my self.
This is not what I am."

"Seeing thus,
the instructed disciple of the noble ones
grows disenchanted with form,
disenchanted with feeling,
disenchanted with perception,
disenchanted with fabrications,
disenchanted with consciousness.

Through disenchantment,
he becomes dispassionate.
Through dispassion,
he is fully released.
With full release,
there is the knowledge,
'Fully released.'
He discerns that
'Birth is ended,
the holy life fulfilled,
the task done.
There is nothing further for this world.'"

"Tissa, it's as if there were two men,
one not skilled in the path,
the other skilled in the path.
In that case
the man not skilled in the path
would ask the man skilled in the path
about the path.
The second man would say,
'Come, my good man,
this is the path.
Go along it a little further
and you will see a fork in the road.
Avoiding the left fork,
take the right.
Go along a little further
and you will see an intense forest grove.
Go along a little further
and you will see a large marshy swamp.
Go along a little further
and you will see a deep drop-off.
Go along a little further
and you will see a delightful stretch of level ground.

"I have made this comparison, Tissa,
to convey a meaning.
The meaning is this:

The man unskilled in the path
stands for a run-of-the-mill person.

The man skilled in the path
stands for the Tathagata,
worthy and rightly self-awakened.

The fork in the road
stands for uncertainty.

The left fork
stands for the eightfold wrong path
— i.e., wrong view,
wrong resolve,
wrong speech,
wrong action,
wrong livelihood,
wrong effort,
wrong mindfulness,
wrong concentration.

The right fork
stands for the noble eightfold path
— i.e., right view,
right resolve,
right speech,
right action,
right livelihood,
right effort,
right mindfulness,
right concentration.

The intense forest grove
stands for ignorance.

The large marshy swamp
stands for sensual desires.

The deep drop-off
stands for anger and despair.

The delightful stretch of level ground
stands for Unbinding.

"Rejoice, Tissa! Rejoice!
I am here to exhort you,
I am here to aid you,
I am here to instruct you!"

That is what the Blessed One said.
Gratified, Ven. Tissa delighted in the Blessed One's words.

 


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