Samyutta Nikaya Masthead


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Saŋyutta Nikāya,
V: MahāVagga
47. Satipaṭṭhana Saŋyutta
4. Anussuta-Vagga

Sutta 37

Chanda Suttaɱ

Desire

Translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu.
Provenance, terms and conditons

 


 

[1][pts][bodh][olds]At Savatthi.

"Monks, there are these four establishings of mindfulness.

Which four?

"There is the case where a monk remains focused on the body in and of itself — ardent, alert, and mindful — subduing greed and distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on the body in and of itself, any desire for the body is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized.

"He remains focused on feelings in and of themselves — ardent, alert, and mindful — subduing greed and distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on feelings in and of themselves, any desire for feelings is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized.

"He remains focused on the mind in and of itself — ardent, alert, and mindful — subduing greed and distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on the mind in and of itself, any desire for the mind is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized.

"He remains focused on mental qualities in and of themselves — ardent, alert, and mindful — subduing greed and distress with reference to the world. For him, remaining focused on mental qualities in and of themselves, any desire for mental qualities is abandoned. From the abandoning of desire, the deathless is realized."

 


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement   Webmaster's Page