Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikaya:
Dukanipata

IX. Dhamma Vaggo

Suttas 86-96

'Things'

Translated from the Pali By Michael Olds

 


 

Sutta 86

[86] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing.'[1].

What two?

The heart's release
and release through wisdom.

Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 87

[87] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Exertion and Equanimity[2].
Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 88

[88] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Name and Form[3].
Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 89

[9] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Vision[4] and Freedom.
Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 90

[90] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

The becoming view
and the ending view.[5]
Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 91

[91] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

No sense of shame
and no fear of blame.
Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 92

[92] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Sense of shame
and fear of blame.

Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 93

[93] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Harshness and bad friends.

Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 94

[94] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Gentility and lovely friends.

Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 95

[95] [pts][ 84 ] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Skill with the elements
and skill in examining things mentally.

Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 96

[96] [pts] Two, me beggars, have a 'thing'.

What two?

Skill concerning errors
and skill at recouperating from errors.

Indeed, beggars, these two have a 'thing',
I say.

 

Vaggo navamo

 


[1]Dhamma. Woodward: "conditions", reading lowercase "D". In this little group I think we have an indication of the true meaning of "Dhamma." Not "The Teaching" nor, either, just "thing"; but a force of natural law, similar to the "Tao" or "Chi" or "The Force", what I believe is always intended when the Buddha himself speaks of "Dhamma". Early English translations spoke of "The Law" which my guess is came from initial investigations into the meaning that were later quashed in favour of the meaning imposed by the commentaries. I am using "thing' as indicating phenomena which have an intimate relationship to each other. Have a 'thing' [together, with each other].

[2]Avikkhepo. Not Upekkha. Non-disturbedness especially of mind.

[3]Nāmañ ca rūpañ ca. I have come full circle in the translation of this. Name I believe means exactly that: that the baseline function of the individual mind is to distinguish itself and things by way of names; rupa is the shape or form of those things.

[4]Vijja translated here by Woodward as "knowledge" for his "knowledge and release".

[5]Bhava-diṭṭhi ca vibhavadiṭṭhi ca. Taken by Woodward (translating as the view of becoming and the view of non-becoming) to stand for the eternalism and annihilationism views. I say not necessarily. These are "Dhamma". Without the aid of the commentaries these can be seen as two ways of seeing -- in other words, not reaching yet to the stage of having become theoretical viewpoints concerning ultimate reality.

 


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