Anguttara Nikaya


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Anguttara Nikaya:
Dukanipata

X. Bāla Vaggo (2nd)

Suttas 97-116

Fools

Translated from the Pali By Michael Olds

 


 

Sutta 97

[97][ati][pts] Two, me beggars, are fools.
What two?

He who carries a load that has not come to him,
and he who does not carry a load that has come to him.[1]

Indeed, beggars, these are two fools.

 

§

 

Sutta 98

[98][pts] Two, me beggars, are sages.
What two?

He who carries a load that has come to him,
and he who does not carry a load that has not come to him.

Indeed, beggars, these are two sages.

 

§

 

Sutta 99

[99] [pts] Two, me beggars, are fools.
What two?

He who perceives the impropper as propper,
and he who perceives the propper as impropper.

Indeed, beggars, these are two fools.

 

§

 

Sutta 100

[100] [pts] Two, me beggars, are sages.
What two?

He who perceives the impropper as impropper,
and he who perceives the propper as propper.

Indeed, beggars, these are two sages.

 

§

 

Sutta 101

[101] [pts] Two, me beggars, are fools.
What two?

He who perceives an error as not an error,
and he who perceives what is not an error as an error.

Indeed, beggars, these are two fools.

 

§

 

Sutta 102

[102] [pts] Two, me beggars, are sages.
What two?

He who perceives an error as an error,
and he who perceives what is not an error as not an error.

Indeed, beggars, these are two sages.

 

§

 

Sutta 103

[103] [pts][85] Two, me beggars, are fools.
What two?

He who perceives what is not Dhamma as Dhamma,
and he who perceives what is Dhamma as not Dhamma.

Indeed, beggars, these are two fools.

 

§

 

Sutta 104

[104] [pts] Two, me beggars, are sages.
What two?

He who perceives what is not Dhamma as not Dhamma,
and he who perceives what is Dhamma as Dhamma.

Indeed, beggars, these are two sages.

 

§

 

Sutta 105

[105] [pts] Two, me beggars, are fools.
What two?

He who perceives what is not Discipline as Discipline,
and he who perceives what is Discipline as not Discipline.

Indeed, beggars, these are two fools.

 

§

 

Sutta 106

[106] [pts] Two, me beggars, are sages.
What two?

He who perceives what is not Discipline as not Discipline,
and he who perceives what is Discipline as Discipline.

Indeed, beggars, these are two sages.

 

§

 

Sutta 100

[107] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods[2] prosper.
In which two?

In he who is not disturbed
by what should disturb[3],
and in he who is disturbed
by what should not disturb.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 108

[108] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods do not prosper.
In which two?

In he who is not disturbed
by what should not disturb,
and in he who is disturbed
by what should disturb.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods do not prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 109

[109] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods prosper.
In which two?

In he who perceives the impropper as proper,
and in he who perceives the proper as improper.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 110

[110] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods do not prosper.
In which two?

In he who perceives the impropper as impropper,
and in he who perceives the propper as propper.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods do not prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 111

[111] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods prosper.
In which two?

[86] In he who perceives an error as not an error,
and in he who perceives what is not an error as an error.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 112

[112] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods do not prosper.
In which two?

In he who perceives an error as an error,
and in he who perceives what is not an error as not an error.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods do not prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 113

[113] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods prosper.
In which two?

In he who perceives what is not Dhamma as Dhamma,
and in he who perceives what is Dhamma as not Dhamma.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 114

[114] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods do not prosper.
In which two?

In he who perceives what is not Dhamma as not Dhamma,
and in he who perceives what is Dhamma as Dhamma.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods do not prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 115

[115] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods prosper.
In which two?

In he who perceives what is not Discipline as Discipline,
and in he who perceives what is Discipline as not Discipline.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods prosper.

 

§

 

Sutta 116

[116] [pts] In two, beggars, the no-goods do not prosper.
In which two?

In he who perceives what is not Discipline as not Discipline,
and in he who perceives what is Discipline as Discipline.

Indeed, beggars, in these two the no-goods do not prosper.

 

Vaggo dasamo.

 


[1] I like Woodward's: "shoulders a burden that does not befall him" as it is the way this is heard in speech today; the only problem is that it does not quite cover the case I believe is implied by the Pali "anāgata", "not [yet] got" meaning that the problem is acting in anticipation of the future.

[2] Āsavās.

[3] Kukkuccā. the "trembling" part of fear and trembling; worry by most translators; remorse by Bodhi and Nanamoli. Since kukkucca is a hindrance, and the hindrances are to be got rid of by the well taught student of the Aristocrats, we must understand what is disturbing to be being disturbed by anything at all in the world; what should not be found disturbing is the fact that every confounded thing is unstable, is painful to the degree one is attached; and is not the self or what belongs to the self.

 


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