Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
III. Upari Paṇṇāsa
4. Vibhaŋga Vagga

Sutta 139

The Arana-Vibhaŋga Sutta

Analyzing Disengagement

Retold by Michael Olds,
based on the Pali

 


 

[1][chlm][pts][ntbb][upal] I HEAR TELL:

Once Upon a Time, Bhagava, Savatthi-town, Anathapindika's Park, Jeta Grove revisiting, said this to the Beggars gathered round:

Beggars! he says.

And "Broke Tooth!" they respond.

I will analyze for you the art of disengagement.

Listen up good, pay attention, I will speak!

"Even so, Bhante!"

And what is the Art of Disengagement?

[2] It is not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures — stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment.

[3] It is not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment.

[4] Working towards neither of these extreme ends, the Art of Disengagement is the walking of that Middle Path awakened to by the Tathagata, made visible, made known, peaceful, conducing to higher knowledge, self-awakening, Nibbana.

[5] The Art of Disengagement, beggars, is knowing what it is to take sides and to be biased either for or against, and it is the non advocacy of either side, the not being biased either for or against, but simply teaching dhamma.

[6] The Art of Disengagement, beggars, is understanding how to judge what is pleasant and knowing how to judge what is pleasant, being occupied solely by inward pleasantness.

[7] It is knowing about what should be spoken of and what should be left unsaid, knowing the appropriate time to speak about private matters and when and when not to confront another with what is upleasant to hear.

[8] It is the art of speaking clearly, without hurry or drama, without either denegrating the local idiom or adhering rigidly only to what is acceptable speach in certain circles.

[9] This, Beggars, is The Art of Disengagement.

[10] And what, Beggars, is the Analysis of the Art of Disengagement?

[11] This is what is meant by the statement: "It is not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures; it is not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment":

[12] Whatever is intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is going to one extreme. This is not the High Way.

[13] Whatever is non intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, not submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is the practice of the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way.

[14] Whatever is intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is going to the other extreme. This is not the High Way.

[15] Whatever is non intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is the practice of the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way.

[16] This is what it means, Beggars, to say: "Going after neither of these extremes the Art of Disengagement is the walking of that Middle Path awakened to by the Tathagata, made visible, made known, peaceful, conducing to higher knowledge, self-awakening, Nibbana. This is that High Way itself, that is to say: High View, High Principles, High Talk, High Works, High Lifestyle, High Self Control, High Mental Preparation, High Getting High, High Vision and High Objective Detachment.

[17] This is what it means, beggars, to take sides or to be biased either for or against:

[18] In the case of the first case you have the case of the Beggar here who is biased for or against. He indicates his bias against by saying: "All of you[1] who are intent on the experience of pleasure associated with the senses, you are all submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. You are doing a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are all going to one extreme. You are not practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are not going along the High Way."

[19] He indicates bias for by saying: "All of you who are not intent on the experience of pleasure associated with the senses, you are not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, not submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. You are not doing a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are not going to that extreme. You are practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are going along the High Way."

[20] He indicates bias against by saying: "All of you who are intent on inflicting pain, punishments, misery on yourselves, that is what is called being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. You are doing a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are going to the other extreme. You are not practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are not going along the High Way."

[21] He indicates bias for by saying: "All of you who are not intent on inflicting pain, punishments, misery on yourselves, that is what is called not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. You are not doing a thing which does has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are not going to that extreme. You are practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are going along the High Way."

[22] He indicates bias against by saying: "All of you who have not let go of the yoke to rebirth are subject to grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are not practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are not going along the High Way."

[23] He indicates bias for by saying: "All of you who who have let go of the yoke to rebirth are not subject to grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are going along the High Way."

[24] This is what it means, beggars, to not take sides and to not be biased either for or against, and not taking sides, not being biased either for or against, to simply teach dhamma:

[25] Here one does not take sides, does not indicate bias for or against and simply teaches dhamma by saying: "Whatever is intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence.This is going to one extreme. This is not practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is not the High Way."

[26] Or by saying: "Whatever is non intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, not submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way."

[27] Or by saying: "Whatever is intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is going to the other extreme. This is not practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is not the High Way.

[28] Or by saying: "Whatever is non intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way.

[29] Or by saying: "To not let go of the yoke to rebirth is to be subject to grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is not going along the High Way."

[30] Or by saying: "To let go of the yoke to rebirth is to be free from grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is going along the High Way."

[31] This is what it means, Beggars, to say: "Going after neither of these extremes the Art of Disengagement is the walking of that Middle Path awakened to by the Tathagata, made visible, made known, peaceful, conducing to higher knowledge, self-awakening, Nibbana. This is that High Way itself, that is to say: High View, High Principles, High Talk, High Works, High Lifestyle, High Self Control, High Mental Preparation, High Getting High, High Vision and High Objective Detachment."

[32] This is what it means, Beggars, to understand how to judge what is pleasant and knowing how to judge what is pleasant, to be occupied by the inward pleasantness:

[33] These five are called "The Harnesses of Sense Pleasures." What five? Those Visible Objects, Sounds, Scents, Savours and Touches that are wished for, wanted, much desired, yearned for, mooned over, saught after, that are enjoyed and liked, that conduce to desire and lust. These are called "The five Harnesses of sense pleasures."

[34] That pleasure that is experienced as a consequence of being Harnessed through these five Harnesses of sense pleasure are called: the ploys, the being in the employment of sense pleasures, stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment; things which have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence; going to the extreme; not an aspect of the Art of Disengagement, not going along the High Way.

[35] Pleasure of this sort, Beggars, should not be wished for, wanted, much desired, yearned for, mooned over, saught after, indulged in, cultivated or developed. They are such as suchas is to be feared, say I.

[36] But here a Beggar, letting go of pleasures of this low sort, separating himself from unskillful states that hinder, turning his mind to the appreciation of the peace and calm of solitude, soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the appreciation of the peace and calm of solitude, enters into and lives in the first burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I.

[37] Or, again, Beggars, letting go of thinking and thinking about, with a sense of Enthusiasm and enjoyment born of the appreciation of getting high, soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the Enthusiasm and enjoyment born of the appreciation of geting high, a Beggar enters into and lives in the second burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I.

[38] Or, again, Beggars, letting go of enthesuiasm, simply enjoying the ease spoken of by the Aristocrats when they say: "Satisfied with getting high, this beggar has the life!" Soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the enjoyment of ease, he enters into and lives in the third burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I.

[39] Or, again, Beggars, by letting go of ease, by letting go of both mental pleasure and mental pain and bodily pleasure and bodily pain, thoroughly detached, getting high off the bright shinny clean clear through radiance of detachment, soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the pleasure of the bright shinny clean clear through radiance of detachment, he enters into and lives in the fourth burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I.

[40] This is what it means, Beggars, to understand how to judge what is pleasant and knowing how to judge what is pleasant, to be occupied by the inward pleasantness.

[41] This is what it means to know about what should be spoken of and what should be left unsaid, to know the appropriate time to speak about private matters and confront another with what is upleasant to hear:

[42] Here Beggars, if a matter heard privately is not in accordance with the facts, is distorted, and is irrelevant to attainment, then one should not repeat such talk.

[43] If a matter heard privately is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, but is irrelevant to attainment, then one should not repeat such talk.

[44] And if a matter heard privately is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, and is relevant to attainment then when the appropriate circumstances present themselves[2] such talk may be repeated.

[45] Or if a matter is deemed to be unpleasant to hear, is not in accordance with the facts, is distorted, and is irrelevant to attainment, then one should not confront an individual with such a subject.

[46] Or if a matter is deemed to be unpleasant to hear, is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, and is irrelevant to attainment, then one shold not confront an individual with such a subject.

[47] But if a matter is deemed to be upleasant to hear, is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, and is relevant to attainment, then when the appropirate circumstances present themselves one may confront an individual with such a subject.

[48] This, beggars, is the art of speaking clearly, without either denegrating the local idiom or adhering rigidly only to what is acceptable speech in certain circles.

[49] In speaking hurredly or in an overly dramatic manner, beggars, one is quickly fatigued, one loses one's train of thought, the voice gets hoarse and loses it's pleasant sound, and the meaning is not conveyed clearly.

[50] Speaking in an unhurried manner without over-dramatizing, beggars, one is not quickly fatigued, one retains one's train of thought, the voice does not get horse and lose it's pleasant sound, and the meaning is conveyed clearly.

[51] In different areas of the country, in different social classes, and across Time, a patta has come to be known as a bowl, a platter, a plate, a tin, a cup, a trencher, a saucer, a dish, a vessel, a pan, a pot, a mug, a basin, china, and so forth.

[52] One denegrates the local idiom and adheres rigidly only to what is accceptable speech in certain circles by saying: "This is a patta, (or a bowl, a platter, a plate, a tin, a cup, a trencher, a saucer, a dish, a vessel, a pan, a pot, a mug, a basin, and so forth). This and this alone is the proper word for this, all other words for this are incorrect."

[53] One does not denegrate the local idiom or adhere rigidly only to what is acceptable speech in certain circles saying: "This which here is called a patta, those there call a bowl (or a platter, a plate, a tin, a cup, a trencher, a saucer, a dish, a vessel, a pan, a pot, a mug, a basin, and so forth), so when the word "bowl (or platter, or plate, or tin, or cup, or trencher, or saucer, or dish, or vessel, or pan, or pot, or mug, or basin, and so forth) is used you should understand the meaning to be "patta".

 

§

 

[54] Here then, whatever is intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is going to one extreme. This is not the High Way. This is being engaged.

[55] Here then, whatever is non intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, not submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is the practice of the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way. This is being disengaged.

[56] Here then, whatever is intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is going to the other extreme. This is not the High Way. This is being engaged.

[57] Here then, whatever is non intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is the practice of the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way. This is being disengaged.

[58] This is what it means then, Beggars, to say: "Going after neither of these extremes the Art of Disengagement is the walking of that Middle Path awakened to by the Tathagata, made visible, made known, peaceful, conducing to higher knowledge, self-awakening, Nibbana. This is that High Way itself, that is to say: High View, High Principles, High Talk, High Works, High Lifestyle, High Self Control, High Mental Preparation, High Getting High, High Vision and High Objective Detachment. This is what it means to be disengaged.

[59] Here again, beggars, you have the case of the Beggar here who is biased for or against. He indicates his bias against by saying: "All of you who are intent on the experience of pleasure associated with the senses, you are all submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. You are doing a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are all going to one extreme. You are not practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are not going along the High Way." This is being engaged.

[60] And here again, he indicates bias for by saying: "All of you who are not intent on the experience of pleasure associated with the senses, you are not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, not submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. You are not doing a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are not going to that extreme. You are practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are going along the High Way." This is being engaged.

[61] And here again he indicates bias against by saying: "All of you who are intent on inflicting pain, punishments, misery on yourselves, that is what is called being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. You are doing a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are going to the other extreme. You are not practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are not going along the High Way." This is being engaged.

[62] And here again he indicates bias for by saying: "All of you who are not intent on inflicting pain, punishments, misery on yourselves, that is what is called not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. You are not doing a thing which does has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are not going to that extreme. You are practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are going along the High Way." This is being engaged.

[63] And here again, he indicates bias against by saying: "All of you who have not let go of the yoke to rebirth are subject to grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are not practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are not going along the High Way." This is being engaged.

[64] And here again he indicates bias for by saying: "All of you who who have let go of the yoke to rebirth are not subject to grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. You are practicing the Art of Disengagement. You are going along the High Way." This is being engaged.

[65] But here one does not take sides, does not indicate bias for or against and simply teaches dhamma by saying: "Whatever is intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence.This is going to one extreme. This is not practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is not the High Way." This is being disengaged.

[66] Or by saying: "Whatever is non intent to experience pleasure associated with the senses, that is what is called not submitting to the ploy of sweet pleasures, not submitting to the ploy of stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way." This is being disengaged.

[67] Or by saying: "Whatever is intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which has grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is going to the other extreme. This is not practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is not the High Way." This is being disengaged.

[68] Or by saying: "Whatever is non intent to inflict pain, punishments, misery on the self, that is what is called not being employed in exhosting the self in painful, unaristocratic toil unconnected to attainment. This is a thing which does not have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not going to that extreme. This is practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is the High Way." This is being disengaged.

[69] Or by saying: "To not let go of the yoke to rebirth is to be subject to grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is not practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is not going along the High Way." This is being disengaged.

[70] Or by saying: "To let go of the yoke to rebirth is to be free from grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence. This is practicing the Art of Disengagement. This is going along the High Way." This is being disengaged.

[71] This is what it means, Beggars, to say: "Going after neither of these extremes the Art of Disengagement is the walking of that Middle Path awakened to by the Tathagata, made visible, made known, peaceful, conducing to higher knowledge, self-awakening, Nibbana. This is that High Way itself, that is to say: High View, High Principles, High Talk, High Works, High Lifestyle, High Self Control, High Mental Preparation, High Getting High, High Vision and High Objective Detachment." This is what it means to be disengaged.

[72] Here, Beggars, that pleasure that is experienced as a consequence of being Harnessed through these five Harnesses of sense pleasure are called: the ploys, the being in the employment of sense pleasures, stuff that has been left behind, ordinary, plain, unaristocratic, not connected to attainment; things which have grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair as a consequence; going to the extreme; not an aspect of the Art of Disengagement, not going along the High Way.

[73] Pleasure of this sort, Beggars, should not be wished for, wanted, much desired, yearned for, mooned over, saught after, indulged in, cultivated or developed. They are such as suchas is to be feared, say I. Being Harnessed to pleasures of this sort, beggars, is to be engaged.

[74] But here a Beggar, letting go of pleasures of this low sort, separating himself from unskillful states that hinder, turning his mind to the appreciation of the peace and calm of solitude, soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the appreciation of the peace and calm of solitude, enters into and lives in the first burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I. This is being disengaged.

[75] Or, again, Beggars, letting go of thinking and thinking about, with a sense of Enthusiasm and enjoyment born of the appreciation of getting high, soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the Enthusiasm and enjoyment born of the appreciation of geting high, a Beggar enters into and lives in the second burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I. This is being disengaged.

[76] Or, again, Beggars, letting go of enthesuiasm, simply enjoying the ease spoken of by the Aristocrats when they say: "Satisfied with getting high, this beggar has the life!" Soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the enjoyment of ease, he enters into and lives in the third burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I. This is being disengaged.

[77] Or, again, Beggars, by letting go of ease, by letting go of both mental pleasure and mental pain and bodily pleasure and bodily pain, thoroughly detached, getting high off the bright shinny clean clear through radiance of detachment, soaking, permeating, suffusing and saturating that body there with the pleasure of the bright shinny clean clear through radiance of detachment, he enters into and lives in the fourth burning. This is called the happiness of letting go, the happiness of being above it all, the happiness of peace and calm, the happiness of self-awakening. This is a happiness that should be wished for, wanted, desired, saught after, indulged in, cultivated and developed. This is happiness that is an aspect of The Art of Disengagement. This is being occupied by inward pleasure. This is a happiness free from fear, say I. This is being disengaged.

[78] Again, Beggars, here, if a matter heard privately is not in accordance with the facts, is distorted, and is irrelevant to attainment, then one should not repeat such talk. This is being disengaged.

[79] If a matter heard privately is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, but is irrelevant to attainment, then one should not repeat such talk. This is being disengaged.

[80] And if a matter heard privately is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, and is relevant to attainment then when the appropriate circumstances present themselves such talk may be repeated. This is being disengaged.

[81] Or if a matter is deemed to be unpleasant to hear, is not in accordance with the facts, is distorted, and is irrelevant to attainment, then one should not confront an individual with such a subject. This is being disengaged.

[82] Or if a matter is deemed to be unpleasant to hear, is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, and is irrelevant to attainment, then one shold not confront an individual with such a subject. This is being disengaged.

[83] But if a matter is deemed to be upleasant to hear, is in accordance with the facts, is not distorted, and is relevant to attainment, then when the appropirate circumstances present themselves one may confront an individual with such a subject. This is being disengaged.

[84] And here, Beggars, in speaking hurredly or in an overly dramatic manner, beggars, is being engaged.

[85] Speaking in an unhurried manner without over-dramatizing, beggars, is being disengaged.

[86] And here, denegrating the local idiom and adhering rigidly only to what is accceptable speech in certain circles by saying: "This is a patta, (or a bowl, a platter, a plate, a tin, a cup, a trencher, a saucer, a dish, a vessel, a pan, a pot, a mug, a basin, and so forth). This and this alone is the proper word for this, all other words for this are incorrect;" This is being engaged.

[87] But not denegrating the local idiom or adhering rigidly only to what is acceptable speech in certain circles by saying: "This which here is called a patta, those there call a bowl (or a platter, a plate, a tin, a cup, a trencher, a saucer, a dish, a vessel, a pan, a pot, a mug, a basin, and so forth), so when the word "bowl (or platter, or plate, or tin, or cup, or trencher, or saucer, or dish, or vessel, or pan, or pot, or mug, or basin, and so forth) is used you should understand the meaning to be "patta". This is being disengaged.

[88] Wherefore, Beggars, train yourselves this way: "Let us recognize the two extreme ends of being engaged and recognizing the engaged and the disengaged, let us practice the Art of Disengagement and walk the walking of that Middle Path awakened to by the Tathagata, made visible, made known, peaceful, conducing to higher knowledge, self-awakening, Nibbana. This is that High Way itself, that is to say: High View, High Principles, High Talk, High Works, High Lifestyle, High Self Control, High Mental Preparation, High Getting High, High Vision and High Objective Detachment."

 


[1] Any indication of a "subject" for the statement: "Those who", "Anyone," "You," "So and So," etc. But the interesting thing to note here is the way The Buddha is using his own way of describing the categories of bias as the object of this analysis, so that we end up with what not to do on two levels (engagement in pleasure-seeking and bias) and how not to think or speak about what we are not to do as well. A very efficient way to drive home a lesson.

[2] Such as when the person themselves brings up the subject, when the person asks a direct question that elicits that information, or when one judges that the person will be receptive to discussion of the subject.


 

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