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Saɱyutta Nikāya
III. Khandha Vagga
22. Khandhasaɱyutta

Sutta 94

Puppha Suttaɱ

Flowers

(or Growth)

Translated from the Pali by Michael Olds

 


 

[1][pts][bodh] I HEAR TELL,

Once Upon a Time in Savatthi-town the Bhagava came a revisit'n, and there, to the Beggars gathered round he said:

"It is not, Beggars, I that dispute with the world,
it is the world that disputes with me.

No one experienced in dhamma[1],
beggars, would in any way dispute with the world.

That, beggars, which is considered as non-existant by the wise of the world
of that I too say:

"That is not."

That, beggars, which is considered as existing by the wise of the world,
of that I too say:

"That is."

 


 

What, beggars, is considered as non-existant by the wise of the world
of which I too say:

"That is not"?

That matter, beggars,
which is unchanging,
true,
endless,
not subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world
to be non-existant;
of this I too say:

"This is non-existant."

That sense experience, beggars,
which is unchanging,
true,
endless,
not subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world
to be non-existant;
of this I too say:

"This is non-existant."

That perception, beggars,
which is unchanging,
true,
endless,
not subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world
to be non-existant;
of this I too say:

"This is non-existant."

That personal world, beggars,
which is unchanging,
true,
endless,
not subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world
to be non-existant;
of this I too say:

"This is non-existant."

That consciousness, beggars,
which is unchanging,
true,
endless,
not subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world
to be non-existant;
of this I too say:

"This is non-existant."

These, beggars, are the things
considered as non-existant by the wise of the world
of which I too say:

"This is non-existant."

 


 

And what, beggars,
are the things considered as existing by the wise of the world
of which I too say:

"This exists"?

That matter, beggars,
which changes,
is painful,
is subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world to exist;
of this I too say:

"This exists."

That sense experience,
which changes,
is painful,
is subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world to exist;
of this I too say:

"This exists."

That perception,
which changes,
is painful,
is subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world to exist;
of this I too say:

"This exists."

That personal world,
which changes,
is painful,
is subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world to exist;
of this I too say:

"This exists."

That consciousness,
which changes,
is painful,
is subject to reversal,
this is considered by the wise of the world to exist;
of this I too say:

"This exists."

These, beggars, are the things considered as existing by the wise of the world of which I too say:

"This exists."

 


 

There is, beggars, a world of worldly things
which the Tathāgata has understood[2] and comprehended;
which, understanding and comprehending;
is explained,
told of,
made known,
set out,
revealed,
analysed,
put into words.

What, beggars, is that world of worldly things
which the Tathāgata has understood and comprehended;
which, understanding and comprehending,
is explained,
told of,
made known,
set out,
revealed,
analysed,
put into words?

Matter, beggars,
is a worldly thing in the world
which the Tathāgata has understood and comprehended;
which, understanding and comprehending,
is explained,
told of,
made known,
set out,
revealed,
analysed,
put into words.

He, beggars, to whom the Tathāgata thus explains,
tells of,
makes known,
sets out,
reveals,
analyses,
puts into words,
who does not come to know and see —
about such a one, beggars
a foolish ordinary person
without eyes in his head that can see
what can I do?

Sense experience, beggars
is a worldly thing in the world
which the Tathāgata has understood and comprehended;
which, understanding and comprehending,
is explained,
told of,
made known,
set out,
revealed,
analysed,
put into words.

He, beggars, to whom the Tathāgata thus explains,
tells of,
makes known,
sets out,
reveals,
analyses,
puts into words,
who does not come to know and see —
about such a one, beggars
a foolish ordinary person
without eyes in his head that can see
what can I do?

Perception, beggars
is a worldly thing in the world
which the Tathāgata has understood and comprehended;
which, understanding and comprehending,
is explained,
told of,
made known,
set out,
revealed,
analysed,
put into words.

He, beggars, to whom the Tathāgata thus explains,
tells of,
makes known,
sets out,
reveals,
analyses,
puts into words,
who does not come to know and see —
about such a one, beggars
a foolish ordinary person
without eyes in his head that can see
what can I do?

The personal world, beggars
is a worldly thing in the world
which the Tathāgata has understood and comprehended;
which, understanding and comprehending,
is explained,
told of,
made known,
set out,
revealed,
analysed,
put into words.

He, beggars, to whom the Tathāgata thus explains,
tells of,
makes known,
sets out,
reveals,
analyses,
puts into words,
who does not come to know and see —
about such a one, beggars
a foolish ordinary person
without eyes in his head that can see
what can I do?

Consciousness, beggars
is a worldly thing in the world
which the Tathāgata has understood and comprehended;
which, understanding and comprehending,
is explained,
told of,
made known,
set out,
revealed,
analysed,
put into words.

He, beggars, to whom the Tathāgata thus explains,
tells of,
makes known,
sets out,
reveals,
analyses,
puts into words,
who does not come to know and see —
about such a one, beggars
a foolish ordinary person
without eyes in his head that can see
what can I do?

In the same way, Beggars,
as the blue Lotus,
the red lotus,
the white lotus,
born in the water,
growing in the water,
rising above the surface of the water,
stands unaffected by the water;
in the same way, beggars,
the Tathāgata,
grown up in the world,
living in the world,
is unaffected by the world.

 


[1]dhamma-vādī: Bodhi: "proponent of the Dhamma"; Woodward: "preacher of the norm"; the question is: Is the Buddha here referring to his teaching or to one who advocates seeing "things" (dhammas) as they are? (This was one and the same thing to the Buddha which is why I translate as above).

[2]abhisambujjhati: over-self-awakened to

 


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