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Saṃyutta Nikāya:
IV. Saḷāyatana Vagga
35: Saḷāyatana Saɱyutta
Paññāsako Dutiyo
5. Saḷa Vagga

Sutta 96

Losing Your Grip

Translated from the Pali by Michael Olds

 


 

[1][pts][bodh] I HEAR TELL:

Once upon a time, The Lucky Man, Rajagaha revisiting, the Squirrel's Veluva Grove.

There he addressed the beggars gathered round:
Bhikkhus!"

And "Bhaghava!" the beggars responded.|| ||

Then The Lucky Man said:[1]

[2] "I will delineate for you, beggars, losing your grip, not losing your grip, and mastry over the six realms:

[3] And what, beggars, is losing your grip?

[4] In the case of this case, we have the case of the beggar who at the sight of an object by the eye is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar allows in, does not let go of, does not dispel, does not end, does not cause them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[5] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the hearing of a sound by the ear is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar allows in, does not let go of, does not dispel, does not end, does not cause them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[6] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the smell of a scent by the nose is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar allows in, does not let go of, does not dispel, does not end, does not cause them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[7] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the savour of a taste by the tongue is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recolections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar allows in, does not let go of, does not dispel, does not end, does not cause them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[8] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the feel of a touch by the body is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recolections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar allows in, does not let go of, does not dispel, does not end, does not cause them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[9] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at consciousness of a thing [77] by the mind is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar allows in, does not let go of, does not dispel, does not end, does not cause them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[10] This is called "losing your grip".

 


 

[11] And what, beggars, is not losing your grip?

[12] In the case of this case, we have the case of the beggar who at the sight of an object by the eye is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar does not allow in, lets go of, dispels, ends, and causes them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am not losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'not losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[13] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the hearing of a sound by the ear is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar does not allow in, lets go of, dispels, ends, and causes them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am not losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'not losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[14] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the smell of a scent by the nose is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar does not allow in, lets go of, dispels, ends, and causes them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am not losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'not losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[15] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the savour of a taste by the tongue is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recolections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar does not allow in, lets go of, dispels, ends, and causes them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am not losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'not losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[16] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the feel of a touch by the body is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recolections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar does not allow in, lets go of, dispels, ends, and causes them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am not losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'not losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[17] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at consciousness of a thing by the mind is assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

If such a beggar does not allow in, lets go of, dispels, ends, and causes them to stop becoming, this is how he should understand the case:
"I am not losing my grip of skillful things!
This is called 'not losing your grip' by the Lucky Man."

[18] This is "not losing your grip" say I.

 


 

[19] And what, beggars, is mastry over the six realms?

[20] In the case of this case, we have the case of the beggar who at the sight of an object by the eye is not assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

In this case such a beggar should understand it this way:
"I have mastered this realm.
This is called 'mastry over a realm' by the Lucky Man"

[21] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the hearing of a sound by the ear is not assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

In this case such a beggar should understand it this way:
"I have mastered this realm.
This is called 'mastry over a realm' by the Lucky Man"

[22] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the smell of a scent by the nose is not assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

In this case such a beggar should understand it this way:
"I have mastered this realm.
This is called 'mastry over a realm' by the Lucky Man"

[23] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the savour of a taste by the tongue is not assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recolections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

In this case such a beggar should understand it this way:
"I have mastered this realm.
This is called 'mastry over a realm' by the Lucky Man"

[24] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at the feel of a touch by the body is not assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recolections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

In this case such a beggar should understand it this way:
"I have mastered this realm.
This is called 'mastry over a realm' by the Lucky Man"

[25] And again, we have the case of the beggar who at consciousness of a thing by the mind is not assailed by bad, unprincipled, unskillful recollections and ideas downbound to rebirth.

In this case such a beggar should understand it this way:
"I have mastered this realm.
This is called 'mastry over a realm' by the Lucky Man"

[26] This is "Mastry over the six realms" say I.

 


[1]This Nidana taken from the first previous sutta with a complete Nidana [SN SALV 35.87]. Text for this sutta has no Nidana.

 


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