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Saŋyutta Nikāya,
V: MahāVagga
56. Sacca Saŋyutta
XI. Gatiyo Pañcakā

Suttas 102-131

Five Destinations

Translated from the Pali by Michael Olds

 


 

Translator's Introduction

This is another of those 'mind-twistu' wheel suttas. It is hard for us to think that this would have been given out as presented on one single occasion, but that is more than likely. The idea is to force concentration by the need to keep awake to keep track of a complex series of changes embedded in a mind-numbing repititition where the effect is actually to engrave on the mind the repeated segments. They are the real lesson. That advantage would be lost if the suttas were delivered singly over many days.

This is the final set of suttas of the Samyutta Nikaya.

 


 

Sutta 102

Quitting Humankind

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger[1] amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting human kind reborn among humans,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting humankind reborn among those in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen[2] the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.[3]

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 103

Quitting Humankind 2

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting human kind reborn among humans,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting humankind reborn in the wombs of animals.

[475] What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 104

Quitting Humankind 3

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting human kind reborn among humans,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting humankind reborn in ghostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 105

Quitting Humankind 4

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting human kind reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting humankind reborn among those in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 106

Quitting Humankind 5

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting human kind reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting humankind reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 107

Quitting Humankind 6

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting human kind reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting humankind reborn in gostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 108

Quitting the Godly Realms

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among those in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 109

Quitting the Godly Realms 2

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 110

Quitting the Godly Realms 3

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn in the ghostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 111

Quitting the Godly Realms 4

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among those in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 112

Quitting the Godly Realms 5

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 113

Quitting the Godly Realms 6

[1][pts][than] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the godly realms reborn in the ghostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 114

Quitting Hell

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn among those in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 115

Quitting Hell 2

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 116

Quitting Hell 3

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn in the ghostly garb.

Evam eva kho bhikkhave, appakā te sattā ye nirayā cutā manussesu paccājāyanti.

Atha kho ete va bahutarā sattā ye nirayā cutā pettivisaye paccājāyanti.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 117

Quitting Hell 4

[476] [1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn in the godly realms,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn among those in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 118

Quitting Hell 5

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn in the godly realms,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 119

Quitting Hell 6

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn in the godly realms,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting hell reborn in ghostly garb.

Evam eva kho bhikkhave, appakā te sattā ye nirayā cutā devesu paccājāyanti.

Atha kho ete va bahutarā sattā ye nirayā cutā pettivisaye paccājāyanti.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 120

Quitting Animal Life

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 121

Quitting Animal Life 2

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 122

Quitting Animal Life 3

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn in tht ghostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 123

Quitting Animal Life 4

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 124

Quitting Animal Life 5

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 125

Quitting Animal Life 6

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting animal birth reborn in the ghostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 126

Quitting the Gostly Garb

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 127

Quitting the Gostly Garb 2

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 128

Quitting the Gostly Garb 3

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn among humankind,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn the ghostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 129

Quitting the Gostly Garb 4

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn in hell.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 130

Quitting the Gostly Garb 5

[477] [1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn in the wombs of animals.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 

§

 

Sutta 131

Quitting the Gostly Garb 6

[1][pts] I HEAR TELL:
Once upon a time Bhagava, Vesaliland revisiting, Great Woods, Peaked-roof Hall.

2. There then, The Lucky Man, taking up an itty-bitty bit of dirt on the tip of his nail, addressed the Beggars:

3. What do you think, beggars,
which of these is the bigger amount:
that which is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of my nail,
or this great Earth?

That which is the bigger amount, bhante, that would be this great Earth;
very little is the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail.
It doesn't come to a shell-measure,
it doesn't come to notice,
it doesn't come to a small part,
that is, the itty-bitty bit of dirt taken up on the tip of the Lucky Man's nail in comparison to this great Earth.

4. So it goes, beggars, little is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn among the gods,
and then the other way round, bigger is the amount of beings quitting the ghostly garb reborn in the ghostly garb.

What is the reason for that?

Not having seen the four Aristocratic Truths, beggars.

What four?

The Aristocratic Truth about Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the source of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the ending of Pain,
the Aristocratic Truth about the path-following going to the end of pain.

Therefore, beggars,
do the to be done in connection with 'this is pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a source of pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is an end to pain',
do the to be done in connection with 'there is a path-following going to the end of pain', say I.

 


[1] Translating the exact wording of this sutta from the Pali beats me. The simile is of a big thing compared to a tiny thing. The words in the Pali for the numbers of beings reborn this way and that are 'big' and 'little'. The word 'number' doesn't come in. So trying to be precise we get constructions like: little are the beings reborn ... big are the beings reborn which I doubt is the intended meaning. The other translators have resorted to 'few' and 'many'. My translation is just another variation and is not to be understood as making any claim to greater accuracy. I have tried to make the simile match it's counterpart. This same set of instructions is given elsewhere with the more fitting grain of sand on the fingernail compared to the grains of sand on the banks of the Ganges.

[2] Adiṭṭha. Not-seeing. Make no mistake this does not mean 'not having come into contact with' or 'not understanding' in the intellectual sense. Ditthi is the Pali for 'working hypothesis' or 'theory' or intellectually understood point of view; dittha is having 'seen' a thing as it really is, having seen how it works in reality, having seen the truth of a ditthi through actual experience.

[3] See the introduction to SN 5.56.20 Olds translation. These are not the Four Aristocratic Truths themselves; these are statements pointing to those truths.

 


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