WARREN: BUDDHISM IN TRANSLATIONS

414

 

 


 

 

Ī 85. Residence During the Rainy Season

Translated from the Mahā-Vagga (iii.1.1.)

At that time The Buddha, The Blessed One, was dwelling at Rājagaha in Bamboo Grove, which is in Kalandakanivāpa. Now at that time residence during the rainy season had not been prescribed for the priests by The Blessed One. And the priests went about on their wanderings, both in the cold season, and in the hot season, and in the rainy season. And the people were angered, annoyed, and spoke indignantly:

"Pray, why should the Sakyaputta monks go about on their wanderings both in the cold season, and in the hot season, and in the rainy season, and crush the green grass, and injure beings having but one of the organs of sense, and bring to destruction many small animals? Verily, the followers of heretical sects, possessing but a poorly expounded doctrine, must lie by and compose themselves for residence during the rainy season. Verily, the birds must make their nests in the [415] tops of the trees, and lie by and compose themselves for residence during the rainy season. But these Sakyaputta monks go about on their wanderings, both in the cold season, and in the hot season, and in the rainy season, and crush the green grass, and injure beings having but one of the organs of sense, and bring to destruction many small animals."

And the priests heard that the people were angered, annoyed, and were speaking indignantly; and the priests brought the matter to the notice of The Blessed One.

Then The Blessed One, on this occasion and in this connection, after he had delivered a doctrinal discourse, addressed the priests as follows:

"I prescribe, O priests, that ye enter upon residence." Then it occurred to the priests as follows:

"At what time, pray, ought residence to begin? "And they brought the matter to the notice of The Blessed One.

"I prescribe, O priests, that ye enter upon residence at the time of the annual rains."

Then it occurred to the priests as follows:

"How many, pray, are the days for beginning residence?" And they brought the matter to the notice of The Blessed One.

"There are two days, O priests, on which to begin residence, an earlier and a later. The earlier one is the day after the full moon in the month Āsālhi, and the later is one month after the full moon in the month Āsālhi. These, O priests, are the two days for beginning residence."

And at that time the band of six priests entered upon residence, and in the midst of their residence they went about on their wanderings. And the people were angered, annoyed, and spoke indignantly:

"Pray, why should the Sakyaputta monks go about on their wanderings, both in the cold season, and in the hot season, and in the rainy season, and crush the green grass, and injure beings having but one of the organs of sense, and bring to destruction many small animals? Verily, the followers of heretical sects, possessing but a poorly expounded doctrine, must lie by and compose themselves for residence during the [416] rainy season. Verily, the birds must make their nests in the tops of the trees, and lie by and compose themselves for residence during the rainy season. But these Sakyaputta monks go about on their wanderings in the cold season, and in the hot season, and in the rainy season, and crush the green grass, and injure beings having but one of the organs of sense, and bring to destruction many small animals."

And the priests heard that the people were angered, annoyed, and spoke indignantly; and those that were moderate were angered, annoyed, and spoke indignantly:

"Pray, why should the band of six priests, having once entered upon residence, go about on their wanderings in the midst of the season for residence?" And they brought the matter to the notice of The Blessed One.

Then The Blessed One, on this occasion and in this connection, after he had delivered a doctrinal discourse, addressed the priests:

"O priests, it is not allowed that ye go about on your wanderings after having once entered upon residence, and not having finished either the former or the latter period of three months. If anyone go about on his wanderings, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor."

 

Ī 85b. Residence During the Rainy Season

Translated from the Mahā-Vagga (iv.1.13)

"I prescribe, O priests, that at the end of residence, the priests shall invite criticism in respect to three points; what has been seen, or heard, or suspected. Thus shall ye live in accord with one another, and be released from your offences, and keep the rules of discipline before your eyes. And after this manner, O priests, shall ye invite criticism: By a learned and competent priest shall the motion be brought before the congregation:

"'Reverend sirs, let the congregation hear me! This is the day of inviting criticism. If the congregation is ready, let the congregation invite criticism.'

"Then the senior priest, throwing his cloak over one shoulder, squatting on the ground, and holding forth his joined hands, shall say to the congregation of the priests:

[417]"'Brethren, I invite the criticism of the congregation with respect to what has been seen, or heard, or suspected. Let the venerable brethren have compassion and speak, and when I have seen my offence, I will atone for it. Brethren, a second time . . . a third time I invite the criticism of the congregation with respect to what has been seen, or heard, or suspected. Let the venerable brethren have compassion and speak, and when I have seen my offence, I will atone for it.'

"Then each junior priest, throwing his cloak over one shoulder, squatting on the ground, and holding forth his joined hands, shall say to the congregation of the priests:

"'Reverend sirs, I invite the criticism of the congregation with respect to what has been seen, or heard, or suspected. . . . Reverend sirs, a second time . . . a third time I invite the criticism of the congregation with respect to what has been seen, or heard, or suspected. Let the venerable brethren have compassion and speak, and when I have seen my offence, I will atone for it.'"

 


[ Contents ]
[ Back ]
[ Next: The Mendicant Ideal ]