Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
III. Upari-Paṇṇāsa
2. Anupada Vagga

Sacred Books of the Buddhists
Volume VI
Dialogues of the Buddha
Part V

Further Dialogues of the Buddha
Volume II

Translated from the Pali
by Lord Chalmers, G.C.B.
Sometime Governor of Ceylon

London
Humphrey Milford
Oxford University Press
1927
Public Domain

Sutta 113

Sappurisa Suttaɱ

Attitudes, Good and Bad

 


[37] [177]

[1][pts][than][upal] THUS have I heard:

Once when the Lord was staying at Sāvatthī in Jeta's grove in Anāthapiṇḍika's pleasaunce, the Lord addressed the Almsmen as follows: -

I will tell you about the attitudes
of the good man
and of the bad man.

Listen and pay attention,
and I will speak.

Then to the listening Almsmen the Lord thus began:

What is the good man's attitude? -

Suppose a bad man has gone forth as a Pilgrim
from a family of distinction
and reflects that,
while this is his own case,
other Almsmen have not come
from families of distinction, -
so that,
on family grounds,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects that
it is not by belonging to a distinguished family
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman be no scion racially,
but yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
[38] such a man is thereby
worthy of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of family distinction,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This is the attitude of the good man.

Suppose a bad man
has come from a great family,
or from a family of great substance,
or a family famed for its substance,
and reflects that,
while this is his own case,
other Almsmen have not come from such families, -
so that,
on grounds of eminent wealth,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is a quality of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by belonging to a rich family
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not so descended,
but yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of [178] approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of family riches,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man is famed and renowned,
and reflects that,
while this is so in his case,
these other Almsmen are of little fame and little authority, -
so that, on grounds of fame,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by fame and repute
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not famed and renowned,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of personal fame,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

[39] Again, the bad man is given robes and other requisites,
and reflects that,
while this is so in his case,
these other Almsmen are not given robes and other requisites, -
so that, on grounds of what is given him,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by what is given him
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not given robes and other requisites,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of what is given him,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man has received much instruction,
and reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen are less instructed, -
so that, on grounds of instruction received,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by instruction received
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not given much instruction,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of instruction received,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man is a repository of the Rule,
and reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen are not repositories of the Rule, -
so that, on grounds of being a repository of the Rule,
he exalts himself [40] and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by being a repository of the Rule
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not a repository of the Rule,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of being a repository of the Rule,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man is a preacher of the Doctrine
and reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen are no preachers, -
so that, on grounds of preaching capacity,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by being a preacher of the Doctrine
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not a preacher of the Doctrine,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of being a preacher of the Doctrine,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

[179] Again, the bad man lives in the wilds,
and reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen do not live in the wilds,
- so that, on grounds of being a dweller in the wilds,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by being a dweller in the wilds
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not a dweller in the wilds,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of being a dweller in the wilds,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man is clad in rags from the dust-heap,
[41] and reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen are not so clad,
- so that, on grounds of being clad in rags from the dust-heap,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by being clad in rags from the dust-heap
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman is not clad in rags from the dust-heap,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of being clad in rags from the dust-heap,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man subsists on what he gets from door to door,
and reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen do not subsist on such alms, -
so that, on grounds of subsisting on what he gets from door to door,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by subsisting on what he gets from door to door
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman does not subsist on such alms,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of subsisting on what he gets from door to door,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man lives under a tree,
and reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen do not live under trees, -
so that, on grounds of living under a tree,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by living under a tree
that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that,
even if an Almsman does not live under a tree,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of living under a tree,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is [42] an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man lives in a charnel-ground -
or in the open air -
or sits, but will never lie down -
or takes whatever quarters are allotted to him -
or refuses to eat at more than one sitting;
and he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen do not observe his particular practice, -
so that, on grounds of scrupulosity of practice,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that it is not by living in a charnel-ground -
or in the open air -
or sitting, and never lying down -
or takeing whatever quarters are allotted -
or refusing to eat at more than one sitting;

that the qualities of greed spite and folly
pass away to extinction;
and that, even if an Almsman does not observe such practices,
yet is seized of the Doctrine
and what flows from it,
is of approved behaviour,
and acts consonantly with the Doctrine,
such a man is thereby worthy
of worship and of praise.

So, safe behind the principles
by which he walks,
he does not,
on grounds of scrupulosity of practice,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man,
divested of lusts and wrong disposition,
develops and dwells in the First Ecstasy
and all its zest and satisfaction, -
a state bred of aloofness,
not divorced from observation and reflection.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the First Ecstasy, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the First Ecstasy,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the First Ecstasy,
inas- [180] much as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, [43] safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the First Ecstasy,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man,
rising above reasoning and reflection,
enters on,
and abides in,
the Second Ecstasy
with all its zest and satisfaction, -
a state bred of rapt concentration,
above all observation and reflection,
a state whereby the heart is focussed
and tranquillity reigns within.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the Second Ecstasy, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the Second Ecstasy,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the Second Ecstasy,
inasmuch as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the Second Ecstasy,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man,
by shedding the emotion of zest,
enters on,
and abides in,
the Third Ecstasy,
with its poised equanimity,
mindful and self-possessed,
feeling in his frame
the satisfaction of which the Noble say
that poise and mindfulness bring abiding satisfaction.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the Third Ecstasy, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the Third Ecstasy,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the Third Ecstasy,
inasmuch as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the Third Ecstasy,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man,
by putting from him both satisfaction and dissatisfaction,
and by shedding the joys and sorrows he used to feel,
enters on,
and abides in,
the Fourth Ecstasy, -
the state that,
knowing neither satisfaction nor dissatisfaction,
is the consummate purity
of poised equanimity and mindfulness.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the Fourth Ecstasy, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the Fourth Ecstasy,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the Fourth Ecstasy,
inasmuch as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the Fourth Ecstasy,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man,
by rising at every point
above all perceptions of form
by the disappearance of awareness of sensory reacion
and by dismissing from his mind
perception of differences,
reaching the idea of the infinity of space
develops and dwells in the Realm of Infinite Space.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the Realm of Infinite Space, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the Realm of Infinite Space,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the Realm of Infinite Space,
inasmuch as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the Realm of Infinite Space,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man,
by rising at every point
above the Realm of Infinite Space
reaching the idea of infinity of mind
develops and dwells in
the Realm of Infinite Mind.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the Realm of Infinite Mind, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the Realm of Infinite Mind,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the Realm of Infinite Mind,
inasmuch as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the Realm of Infinite Mind,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

[44]Again, the bad man,
by rising at every point
above the Realm of Infinite Mind
reaching the idea that nothing exists
develops and dwells in
the Realm of Naught.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the Realm of Naught, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the Realm of Naught,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the Realm of Naught,
inasmuch as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the Realm of Naught,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

Again, the bad man,
by rising at every point
above the Realm of Naught
develops and dwells in
the Realm of Neither-Perception-nor-Non-perception.

And he reflects that,
while this is so in his own case,
these other Almsmen have not reached the Realm of Neither-Perception-nor-Non-perception, -
so that, on grounds of reaching the Realm of Neither-Perception-nor-Non-perception,
he exalts himself and disparages others.

This is the attitude of the bad man.

Whereas the good man reflects
that the Lord counselled avoidance
of satisfaction in the attainment of the Realm of Neither-Perception-nor-Non-perception,
inasmuch as,
imagine as they may,
it turns out quite otherwise.

So, safe behind the avoidance of satisfaction,
he does not,
on grounds of having attained the Realm of Neither-Perception-nor-Non-perception,
either exalt himself or disparage others. -

This too is an attitude of the good man.

[45] Again, having in every respect risen above Neither-Perception-nor-Non-perception,
the good man develops,
and dwells in,
the stilling of feeling and perception;
he sees with the eyes of understanding;
and the Cankers are destroyed within him.

Such an Almsman has no imaginings of the individual
as being aught or anywhere or in anything.

Thus spoke the Lord.

Glad at heart,
those Almsmen rejoiced in what the Lord had said.


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