Anguttara Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Aŋguttara-Nikāya
I. Ekanipāta

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Honour to that Exalted Onen, Arahant, the Fully Enlightenend One

Part I
The Book of the Ones

Suttas 1-97

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[1]

Chapter I.
Form and the rest.

[1][olds][upal] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī, at Jeta Grove,
in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Lord,' replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

'Monks, I know of no other single form
by which a man's heart is so enslaved
as it is by that of a woman.

Monks, a woman's form obsesses[1] a man's heart.

[2][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single sound
by which a man's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the voice of a woman.

Monks, a woman's voice obsesses a man's heart.

[3][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single scent
by which a man's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the scent of a woman.

Monks, the scent of a woman obsess a man's heart.

[4][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single savour
by which a man's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the savour of a woman.

Monks, the savour of a woman obsess a man's heart.

[5][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single touch
by which a man's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the touch of a woman.

Monks, the touch of a woman obsess a man's heart.

[6][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single form
by which a woman's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the form of a man.

Monks, a man's form obesses a woman's heart.'

[7][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single sound
by which a woman's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the voice of a man.

Monks, the voice of a man obesses a woman's heart.'

[8][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single scent
by which a woman's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the scent of a man.

Monks, a man's scent obesses a woman's heart.'

[9][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single savour
by which a woman's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the savour of a man.

Monks, the savour of a man obesses a woman's heart.'[2]

[10][olds][upal] Monks, I know of no other single touch
by which a woman's heart is so enslaved
as it is by the touch of a man.

Monks, the touch of a man obsesses a woman's heart.'

Chapter II
Abandoning the hindrances

[11][olds] 'Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of sensual lust,[2]
if not already arisen, or, if arisen,
to cause its more-becoming and increase,
as the feature of beauty (in things).[3]

In him who pays not systematic attention[4]
to the feature of beauty,
sensual lust, if not already arisen, arises:
or, if already arisen, is liable to more-becoming and increase.

[12][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of malevolence,
if not already arisen, or, if arisen,
to cause its more-becoming and increase,
as the repulsive feature (of things).[5]

In him who pays not systematic attention
to the repulsive feature,
malevolence, if not already arisen, arises:
or, if arisen, it is liable to more-becoming and increase.

[13][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of sloth-and-torpor,
if not already arisen,
or, if arisen,
to cause its more-becoming and increase,
as regret, drowsiness, languor,
surfeit after meals
and torpidity of mind.

In him who is of torpid mind,
sloth-and-torpor,
if not already arisen, arises,
and, if arisen,
is liable to more-becoming and increase.

[14][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of excitement-and-flurry,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen,
to cause its more-becoming and increase,
as non-tranquillity of mind.

[3] In him who is of troubled mind
arises excitement-and-flurry,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen,
it is liable to more-becoming and increase.

[15][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of doubt-and-wavering,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen,
to cause its more-becoming and increase,
as unsystematic attention.

In him who gives not systematic attention
arises doubt-and-wavering,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen,
it is liable to more-becoming and increase.

[16][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to prevent the arising of sensual lust,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen,
to cause its abandonment,
as the feature of uglinness (in things).[6]

In him who gives systematic attention
to the feature of ugliness (in things)
sensual lust, if not already arisen, arises not:
or, if arisen, it is abandoned.

[17][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to prevent the arising of malevolence,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen,
to cause its abandonment,
as the heart's release through amity.[7]

In him who gives systematic attention
to amity which releases the heart
malevolence, if not already arisen, arises not:
or, if arisen, it is abandoned.

[18][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to prevent the arising of sloth-and-torpor,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen,
to cause its abandonment,
as the element of putting forth effort,
of exertion, of advancing.[8]

In him who energetically strives,
sloth-and-torpor arises not:
or, if arisen, it is abandoned.

[19][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power [4] to prevent the arising of excitement-and-flurry,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen, to cause its abandonment,
as tranquillity of mind.

In the tranquil-minded excitement-and-flurry arises not:
or, if arisen, it is abandoned.

[20][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to prevent the arising of doubt-and-wavering,
if not already arisen:
or, if arisen, to cause its abandonment,
as systematic attention.

In him who gives systematic attention
doubt-and-wavering arises not:
or, if arisen, it is abandoned.'

Chapter III
The intractable

[21][than][olds] 'Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so intractable[9] as the uncultivated mind.

The uncultivated mind
is indeed a thing intractable.

[22][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so tractable as the cultivated mind.

The cultivated mind
is indeed a tractable thing.

[23][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great loss
as the uncultivated mind.

The uncultivated mind
indeed conduces to great loss.

[24][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great profit
as the cultivated mind.

The cultivated mind
indeed conduces to great profit.

[25][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great loss
as the mind that is uncultivated,
not made lucid.[10]

The uncultivated mind
indeed conduces to great loss.

[5] [26][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great profit
as the mind that is cultivated,
made lucid.

The cultivated mind
indeed conduces to great profit.

[27][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great loss
as the mind that is uncultivated,
not made much of.

The uncultivated mind
indeed conduces to great loss.

[28][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great profit
as the mind that is cultivated,
made much of.

The cultivated mind
indeed conduces to great profit.

[29][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that brings such woe[11]
as the mind that is uncultivated,
not made much of.

The mind that is uncultivated,
not made much of,
indeed brings great woe.

[30][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that brings such bliss
as the mind that is cultivated,
made much of.

Such a mind indeed brings great bliss.'

Chapter IV
The untamed

[31][than][olds] 'Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so intractable as the untamed mind.

The untamed mind
is indeed a thing intractable.

[32][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so tractable as the tamed mind.

The tamed mind
is indeed a tractable thing.

[33][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great loss
as the uncontrolled mind.

The uncontrolled mind
indeed conduces to great loss.

[34][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great profit
as the controlled mind.

The controlled mind
indeed conduces to great profit.

[35][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great loss
as the mind that is unguarded,
not made lucid.

The unguarded mind
indeed conduces to great loss.

[36][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great profit
as the mind that is guarded,
made lucid.

The guarded mind
indeed conduces to great profit.

[37][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great loss
as the mind that is unrestrained,
not made much of.

The unrestrained mind
indeed conduces to great loss.

[38][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to great profit
as the mind that is restrained,
made much of.

The restrained mind
indeed conduces to great profit.

[39][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that brings such woe
as the mind that is untamed,
uncontrolled,
unguarded
and unrestrained.

The mind that is untamed,
uncontrolled,
unguarded
and unrestrained
indeed brings great woe.

[40][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that brings such bliss
as the mind that is tamed,
controlled,
guarded
and restrained.

The tamed,
controlled,
guarded
and restrained mind
indeed brings great bliss.'

Chapter V
(The mind) Directed and Pellucid[12]

[41][olds] 'Suppose, monks, the spike of bearded wheat or bearded barley[13] be ill directed.
When pressed by hand or foot
it cannot possibly pierce hand or foot or draw blood.
Why not?
Because the spike is ill directed.

[6] Just so, monks, it cannot be
that a monk of ill directed mind
will pierce ignorance, draw knowledge, realize Nibbāna.
Why not?
Because his mind is ill directed.

[42][olds] But suppose, monks,
the spike of bearded wheat or bearded barley is well directed.
When pressed by hand or foot
it is certain that it will pierce hand or foot and draw blood.
Why so?
Because, monks, the spike is well directed.

Just so, monks,
it is certain that the monk with a mind that is well directed
will pierce ignorance, draw knowledge, realize Nibbāna.
Why so?
Because, monks, his mind is well directed.

[43][olds] Now here, monks, with my own thought embracing his,[14]
I am aware of a monk whose mind is corrupt.
If at this very time he were to make an end,
he would be put into Purgatory according to his deserts.[15]
Why so?
Because of his corrupt mind.

In like manner, monks,
it is owing to a corrupt mind
that some beings in this world,
when body breaks up, after death
are reborn in the Waste, the Woeful Way,
the Downfall, in Purgatory.

[44][olds] Now here, monks,
with my own thought embracing his,
I am aware of a monk whose mind is pure.[16]
If at this very time he were to make an end,
he would be put into heaven according to his deserts.
Why so?
Because of the purity of his mind.

In like manner, monks,
it is owing to a pure mind
that some beings in this world,
when body breaks up, after death
are reborn in the Happy Lot,
in the Heaven World.

[45][than][olds] Suppose, monks, a pool of water,
turbid, stirred up and [7] muddied.
Then a man who has eyes to see stands upon the bank.
He could not see the oysters and the shells,
the pebbles and the gravel as they lie,
or the shoals of fish that dart about.[17]
Why not?
Because of the turbid state of the water.

Just so it is impossible for that monk of whom I speak
to understand with his turbid mind[18]
either his own profit or that of others:
impossible for him to understand
both his own profit and that of others,
or to realize states surpassing those of ordinary men,
the excellence of truly Ariyan knowledge and insight.[19]
What is the cause of that?
It is the turbid nature of his mind, monks.

[46][than][olds] But suppose, monks, a pool of water,
pellucid, tranquil and unstirred.
Then a man who has eyes to see,
while standing on the bank,
could see the oysters and the shells,
the pebbles and the gravel as they lie,
and the shoals of fish that dart about.
Why so?
Because of the untroubled nature of the water, monks.

Just so it is possible for that monk of whom I speak
with his untroubled mind
to understand either his own profit or that of others,
both his own profit and that of others:
it is possible for him to realize states surpassing those of ordinary men,
the excellence of truly Ariyan knowledge and insight.
What is the cause of that?
The untroubled nature of his mind, monks.

[47][than][olds] Just as, monks,
of all the different sorts of trees
the phandana[20] is reckoned chief
for pliability and adaptability,
even so do I know of no other single condition
so conducive to its pliability and adaptability
as the cultivation and making much of the mind.
Indeed, monks, the mind that is cultivated and made much of
becomes pliable and adaptable.

[48][than][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so quick to [8] change[21] as the mind:
insomuch that it is no easy thing to illustrate
how quick to change it is.

[49][than][olds] This mind, monks, is luminous,[22]
but it is defiled by taints that come from without;
[50][ed1] That mind, monks, is luminous,
but it is cleansed of taints that come from without.'[23]

Chapter VI
The finger-snap

[51][than][olds] This mind, monks, is luminous,
but it is defiled by taints that come from without.
But this the uneducated manyfolk understands not as it really is.
Wherefore for the uneducated manyfolk
there is no cultivation of the mind,
I declare.

[52][than][olds] That mind, monks, is luminous,
but it is cleansed of taints that come from without.
This the educated Ariyan disciple understands as it really is.
Wherefore, for the educated Ariyan disciple
there is cultivation of the mind,
I declare.

[53][olds] Monks, if for just the lasting of a finger-snap[24]
a monk indulges a thought of goodwill,
such an one is to be called a monk.
Not empty of result is his musing.[25]
He abides doing the Master's bidding.
He is one who takes good advice,
and he eats the country's alms-food to some purpose.
What then should I say
of those who make much of such a thought?

[54][olds] Monks, if for just the lasting of a finger-snap
a monk cultivates a thought of goodwill,
such an one is to be called a monk.
Not empty of result is his musing.
He abides doing the Master's bidding.
He is one who takes advice,
and he eats the country's alms-food to some purpose.[26]
What [9] then should I say
of those who make much of such a thought?

[55][olds] Monks, if for just the lasting of a finger-snap
a monk gives attention to a thought of goodwill,
such an one is to be called a monk.
Not empty of result is his musing.
He dwells doing the Master's bidding.
He is one who takes adivice,
and he eats the country's alms-food to some purpose.
What then should I say
of those who make much of such a thought?

[56][olds] Monks, whatsoever things are evil,
have part in evil,
are on the side of evil:
— all such have mind for their causing.
First arises mind as the forerunner of them,
and those evil things follow after.[27]

[57][ed2] Monks, whatsoever things are good,
have part in good,
are on the side of good:
— all such have mind for their causing.
First arises mind as the forerunner of them,
and those good things follow after.

[58][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of evil states,
if not yet arisen,
or to cause the waning of good states,
if already arisen,
as negligence.

In him who is negligent
evil states, if not already arisen, do arise,
and good states, if arisen, do wane.

[59][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of good states,
if not yet arisen,
or to cause the waning of evil states,
if already arisen,
as earnestness.

In him who is earnest
good states, if not yet arisen, do arise,
and evil states, if arisen, do wane.

[60][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of evil states,
if not yet arisen,
or to cause the waning of good states,
if arisen,
as indolence.

In him who is indolent
evil states, not yet arisen, do arise,
and good states, if arisen, do wane.'

Chapter VII
Energetic Effort

[61][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising
of good states not yet arisen
or the waning
of evil states already arisen
as energetic effort.[28]

In him who [10] makes energetic effort[29]
good states not yet arisen do arise
and evil states arisen do wane.

[62][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of evil states not yet arisen
or the waning
of good states already arisen
as greediness.

In him who is greedy
evil states not yet arisen do arise
and good states arisen do wane.

[63][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of good states not yet arisen
or the waning
of evil states already arisen
as wanting little.

In him who wants little
good states not yet arisen do arise
and evil states arisen do wane.

[64][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of evil states not yet arisen
or the waning
of good states already arisen
as discontent.

In him who is discontent
evil states not yet arisen do arise
and good states arisen do wane.

[65][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of good states not yet arisen
or the waning
of evil states already arisen
as contentment.

In him who is content
good states not yet arisen do arise
and evil states arisen do wane.

[66][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of evil states not yet arisen
or the waning
of good states already arisen
as unsystematic attention.

In him of unsystematic attention
evil states not yet arisen do arise
and good states arisen do wane.

[67][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of good states not yet arisen
or the waning
of evil states already arisen
as systematic attention.

In him of systematic attention
good states not yet arisen do arise
and evil states arisen do wane.

[68][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of evil states not yet arisen
or the waning
of good states already arisen
as discomposure.

In him who is discomposed
evil states not yet arisen do arise
and good states arisen do wane.

[69][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of good states not yet arisen
or the waning
of evil states already arisen
as composure.

In him who is composed
good states not yet arisen do arise
and evil states arisen do wane.

[70][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power cause the arising
of evil states not yet arisen
or the waning
of good states already arisen
as bad company.

Monks, in him who keeps bad company
evil states not yet arisen do arise
and good states already arisen do wane.'

Chapter VIII
Friendship with the Lovely

[71][olds] 'Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising
of good states if not yet arisen,
or the waning
of evil states already arisen,
as friendship with the lovely.[30]

In one who is a friend of what is lovely
good states not arisen do arise
and evil states already arisen wane.

[72][olds] 'Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising
evil states if not yet arisen,
or the waning
of good states already arisen,
as devotion to evil states,
and lack of devotion to good states.

In one who is devoted to evil states
and lacks devotion to good states,
evil states not arisen do arise
and good states already arisen wane.

[73][olds] 'Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising
good states if not yet arisen,
or the waning
of evil states already arisen,
as devotion to good states,
and lack of devotion to evil states.

In one who is devoted to good states
and lacks devotion to evil states,
good states not arisen do arise
and evil states already arisen wane.

[74][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to prevent the arising of the limbs of wisdom,[31]
if not yet arisen,
or, if they have already arisen,
to prevent their reaching fulfilment
by cultivation thereof,
as unsystematic attention.

In him who practises unsystematic attention, monks,
the limbs of wisdom if not yet arisen, arise not:
and if arisen they reach not fulfilment
by cultivation thereof.

[75][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
of such power to cause the arising of the limbs of wisdom,
if not yet arisen,
or, if they have already arisen,
to cause their reaching fulfilment
by cultivation thereof,
as systematic attention.

In him who practises systematic attention, monks,
the limbs of wisdom if not yet arisen, arise:
and if arisen they reach fulfilment
by cultivation thereof.

[76][olds] Of slight account, monks,
is the loss of such things as relatives.
Miserable[32] indeed among losses
is the loss of wisdom.[33]

[11] [77][olds] Of slight account, monks,
is the increase of such things as relatives.
Chief of all the increases
is that of wisdom.

Wherefore I say, monks,
ye should train yourselves thus:
We will increase in wisdom.
Ye must train yourselves to win that.

[78][olds] Of slight account, monks,
is the loss of such things as wealth.
Miserable indeed among losses
is the loss of wisdom.

[79][olds] Of slight account, monks,
is the increase of such things as wealth.
Chief of all the increases
is that of wisdom.

Wherefore I say, monks,
thus must ye train yourselves:
We will increase in wisdom.
Ye must train yourselves to win that.

[80][olds] Of slight aecount, monks,
is the loss of such things as reputation.
Miserable indeed among losses
is the loss of wisdom.'

Chapter IX
Earnestness, etc

[81][olds] Of slight account, monks,
is the increase of such things as reputation.[34]
Chief of all the increases
is that of wisdom.

Wherefore I say, monks,
thus should ye train yourselves:
We will increase in wisdom.
Ye must train yourselves to win that.

[82][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does negligence.

Negligence indeed conduces to great loss.

[83][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does earnestness.

Earnestness indeed conduces to great profit.

[84][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does indolence.

Indolence indeed conduces to great loss.

[85][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does energetic effort.

Energetic effort indeed conduces to great profit.

[86][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does wanting much.

Wanting much indeed conduces to great loss.

[87][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does wanting little.

Wanting little indeed conduces to great profit.

[88][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does discontent.

Discontent indeed conduces to great loss.

[89][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does contentment.

Contentment indeed conduces to great profit.

[90][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does unsystematic attention.

Unsystematic attention indeed conduces to great loss.

[91][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does systematic attention.

Systematic attention indeed conduces to great profit.

[92][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does asampajaññaɱ[ed3]

Asampajaññaɱ indeed conduces to great loss.

[93][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does sampajaññaɱ

Sampajaññaɱindeed conduces to great profit.

[94][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does keeping bad company.[ed4]

Keeping bad company indeed conduces to great loss.

[95][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does friendship with the lovely.

Friendship with the lovely indeed conduces to great profit.

[96][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great loss
as does devotion to evil things
and non-devotion to good thigs.

Devotion to evil things,
and non-devotion to good things
indeed conduces to great loss.

[97][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to such great profit
as does devotion to good things
and non-devotion to evil things.

Devotion to good things
and non-devotion to evil things
indeed conduces to great profit.

 


[1]Cittaŋ pariyādāya tiṭṭhati Cf. S. ii, 235; K.S, iii, 17 n.

[2]Kāma-cchando, par. by Comy. as kāmesu ... kāma-rāgo, kāma-nandi, kāma-taṇhā.

[3]Subha-nimitta, par. by Comy. as rāga-ṭṭhānīyaŋ ārammaṇaŋ. Cf. S. v, 64 ff.; K.S. v, 52 n.; Pts. of C., App. 387.

[4]Yoniso manasikāro. Cf. Buddh. Psychology, 123; K.S. i, 131.

[5]Paṭigha-nimitta (cf. asubha-n.)=anitthaŋ. Comy.

[6]Asubha-nimittaŋ Cf. Vis. Magg. 247 ff.; Buddh. Psych. Eth. 69-70 (The Foul Things).

[7]Mettā ceto-vimutti, 'spreading abroad the welfare of all beings.' Comy. Cf. S. ii, 265 and the formula of the brahma-vihāras.

[8]Ārambha-, nikkama-, parakkama-dhātu. Cf. K.S. v, 54; VM. i, 131-3.

[9]Akammanīya. Kamm'akkhamaŋ kamma-yoggaŋ na hoti. Comy. Cf. Dhp. cap. 3 (Citta-Vagga).

[10]Agātubhūtaŋ, acc. to Comy. 'a mind involved in the round of rebirth, incapable of leaping up to, of taking delight in, unworldly things, such as the Way, Nibbāna.' Comy. quotes the Elder Phussamitta. as saying: 'The mind that is on the Way is cultivated, made lucid or manifest.'

[11]Reading with Comy. dukkh¢vahaŋ: the variant is adhivāhaŋ. Cf. S. iv. 70.

[12]Acchanna = 'without covermg.' Here it would refer to water without scum on its surface, as in the simile given below.

[13]Cf. S; v. 10; K.S. v. 9 (of view, rightly or wrongly directed).

[14]Cetasā ceto-paricca.

[15]Yathbhataŋ = yathā āharitvā ṭhapito. Comy. Cf. also M. i, 71, where Comy. also interprets yathā niraya-pālehi āharitvā niraye ṭhapito, 'just as brought by the guardians of P.' Cf. S. iv, 325, yathāhataŋ, where Comy. is silent. Gooneratna, followed by Jayasundera (A. ii, 71), trans. 'like a load laid down.' In translating 'according to his deserts' (as if it were yathārahaŋ') I follow the Pāli Dict. s.v., but the word is obscure. At text 292 I have noted that it may refer to the casting of a true die.

[16]Saddhā-pasādena pasannaŋ. Comy.

[17]Cf. D. i, 84.

[18]Comy. 'overgrown by the five hindrances.'

[19]Uttariŋ manussa-dhammā, i.e. the fruits of trance, insight and Way. Comy.

[20]Reading phandana with MSS. and Comy. for candana (sandalwood) of text and Tīka. G. calls it Adina cordifolia (Sinhalese Kolom).

[21]Lahu-parivaṭṭa. Cf. Buddh. Psych. (2nd ad.) 222; Expos. i, 81; Pts. of Contr. 125; Mil. 104, 106.

[22]Expos. i, 91, 185.

[23]Āgantukehi, 'adventitious.' This, that: idaŋ, idaŋ cf. K.S. ii, p. 23.

[24]Comy. refers to Mil. 102.

[25]A-ritta-jjhāno = atuccha-, apariccatta-jjhāno. Comy.

[26]Amoghaŋ= 'not in vain.' Comy. Cf. Itiv. 90; Dhp. 308:

Better for him who lives unworthily
A red-hot ball to swallow
Than eat the food the country gives in charity';

and below chap. xx.

[27]Cf. Dhp. i-iii

[28]Viriyārambho.

[29]Āraddha-viriya.

[30]Cf. S. v, 29-35.

[31]The bojjhangā are seven. Cf. S. v, 63-140; K.S. v, 51 ff.

[32]Paṭikitthaŋ = pacchimaŋ, lāmakaŋ. Comy.

[33]Pañña.

[34]I think this paragraph, like the first of the previous sections, should belong to the one before. Each chapter is cut up into ten paragraphs, and the method seems regardless of context.

 


[ed1]Woodward combines suttas 49 and 50.

[ed2]Woodward omits this sutta. I follow Woodward's pattern, where he translates akusala as 'evil', in translating kusala as 'good'. See sutta #61.

[ed3]Sampajaññaɱ. PED: attention, consideration, discrimination, comprehension, circumspection. Woodward omits this and it's opposite and has, essentially, two versions of the next two. Confusion caused apparently by translation of kusala as 'good', so he has no option for Pāpa in pāpamittatā. See next.

[ed4] Pāpamittatā. PED: bad company, association with wicked people. Translation picked up from Ch. VII #70.


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement