Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
I. Ekanipāta

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Part I
The Book of the Ones

Suttas 98-187

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


 

[12]

Chapter X (a).
In A Fourfold Way

[98][olds] "Monks, as a matter concerning the self[35]
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as negligence.

Negligence indeed conduces to great loss.

[99][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great gain
as earnestness.

Earnestness indeed conduces to great gain.

[100][olds] 'Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as indolence.

Indolence indeed conduces to great loss.

[101][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great gain
as energetic effort.

Energetic effort indeed conduces to great gain.

[102][olds] 'Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as wanting much.

Wanting much indeed conduces to great loss.

[103][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great gain
as wanting little.

Wanting little indeed conduces to great gain.

[104][olds] 'Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as discontent.

Discontent indeed conduces to great loss.

[105][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great gain
as contentment.

Contentment indeed conduces to great gain.

[106][olds] 'Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as unsystematic attention.

Unsystematic attention indeed conduces to great loss.

[107][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great gain
as systematic attention.

Systematic attention indeed conduces to great gain.

[108][olds] 'Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as discomposure.

Discomposure indeed conduces to great loss.

[109][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great gain
as composure.

Composure indeed conduces to great gain.

[110][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the outside[36]
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as friendship with the evil.

Friendship with the evil
indeed conduces to great loss.

[111][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the outside
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great profit
as friendship with the lovely.

Indeed friendship with the lovely
conduces to great profit.

[112][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great loss
as devotion to things evil
and non-devotion to good things.

Devotion to things evil
and non-devotion to good things
indeed conduces to great loss.

[113][olds] Monks, as a matter concerning the self
I know not of any other single factor
so conducive to great profit
as friendship with the lovely.

Indeed friendship with the lovely
conduces to great profit.

[114][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does negligence.[37]

Negligence indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[115][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as earnestness.

Earnestness indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.

[116][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does indolence.

Indolence indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[117][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as energetic effort.

Energetic effort indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.

[118][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does greediness.

Greediness indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[119][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as wanting little.

Wanting little indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.

[120][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does discontent.

Discontent indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[121][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as contentment.

Contentment indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.

[122][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does unsystematic attention.

Unsystematic attention indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[123][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as systematic attention.

Systematic attention indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.

[124][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does discomposure.

Discomposure indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[125][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as composure.

Composure indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.

[126][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does friendship with the evil.

Friendship with the evil indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[127][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as friendship with the lovely.

Friendship with the lovely indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.

[128][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
that conduces to the confusion,
to the disappearance, of true Dhamma,
as does devotion to evil things
and non-devotion to good things.

Devotion to evil things and
non-devotion to good things
indeed conduces to the confusion
and disappearance of true Dhamma.

[129][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single thing
so conducive to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma
as devotion to good things
and non-devotion to evil things.

Devotion to good things
and non-devotion to evil things
indeed conduces to the establishment,
to the non-disappearance of true Dhamma.'

 

[13]

Chapter X (b)
Not Dhamma (a).

[130][olds] 'Monks, those monks who point out
what is not Dhamma[38] as Dhamma,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[131][olds] Those monks who point to
Dhamma as not Dhamma,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[132][olds] Those monks who point to
what is not the Discipline as the Discipline,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[133][olds] Those monks who point to
what is the Discipline as not the Discipline,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[134][olds] Those monks who point out
things not uttered and proclaimed by the Tathāgata
as having been uttered and proclaimed by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[135][olds] Those monks who point out
what was uttered and proclaimed by him
as not having been so uttered and proclaimed,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[136][olds] Those monks who point out
something not practised by the Tathāgata
as having been practised by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[137][olds] Those monks who point out
something practised by the Tathāgata
as having been not practised by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[138][olds] Those monks who point out
what was not ordained by the Tathāgata
as having been ordained by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[139][olds] Those monks who point out
what was ordained by the Tathāgata
as having been not ordained by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.'

Chapter XI
Not Dhamma (b).

[140][olds][than] 'Those monks who point out
what is not Dhamma as not Dhamma,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[141][olds][than] Those monks who point to Dhamma as [14] Dhamma,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[142][olds] Those monks who point to
what is not the Discipline
as not the Discipline,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[143][olds] Those monks who point to
what is the Discipline as the Discipline,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[144][olds] Those monks who point out
things not uttered and proclaimed by the Tathāgata
as not having been uttered and proclaimed by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[145][olds] Those monks who point out
what was uttered and proclaimed by him
as having been so uttered and proclaimed,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[146][olds] Those monks who point out
something not practised by the Tathāgata
as having been not practised by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[147][olds] Those monks who point out
something practised by the Tathāgata
as having been practised by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[148][olds] Those monks who point out
what was not ordained by the Tathāgata
as having been not ordained by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[149][olds] Those monks who point out
what was ordained by the Tathāgata
as having been ordained by him,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.'

Chapter XII
On unpardonable offences, etc.

[150][olds] 'Those monks who point to
what is not an offence as being an offence,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[151][olds] 'Those monks who point to
an offence as not being such,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[152][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a slight offence as being a serious offence,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[153][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a serious offence as being slight,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[154][olds] 'Those monks who point to
an offence against chastity[39] as not being such,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[155][olds] 'Those monks who point to
what is no offence against chastity
as an offence against chastity,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[156][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a partial offence as a complete one[40],
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[157][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a complete offence as a partial one,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[158][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a pardonable offence as unpardonable,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[159][olds] 'Those monks who point to
an unpardonable offence as pardonable,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the loss of many folk,
to the misery of many folk,
to the loss, the injury, the misery
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such beget great demerit
and cause the disappearance
of this true Dhamma.

[160][olds] 'But those monks who point to
what is no offence as no offence,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[161][olds] 'Those monks who point to
an offence as being such,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[162][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a slight offence as being a slight offence,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[163][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a serious offence as being a serious offence,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[164][olds] 'Those monks who point to
an offence against chastity as being such,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[165][olds] 'Those monks who point to
what is no offence against chastity
as no offence against chastity,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[166][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a partial offence as a partial offence,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[167][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a complete offence as a complete one,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[168][olds] 'Those monks who point to
a pardonable offence as pardonable,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

[169][olds] 'Those monks who point to
an unpardonable offence as unpardonable,
— such conduct of theirs
is to the profit of many folk,
to the happiness of many folk,
to the good, profit and happiness
of devas and mankind.
Moreover, such monks beget great merit
and establish this true Dhamma.

Chapter XIII
The one person.[41]

[170][olds] 'Monks, there is one person
whose birth into the world
is for the welfare of many folk,
for the happiness of many folk:
who is born out of compassion for the world,
for the profit, welfare and happiness
of devas and mankind.

Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is [15] Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[171][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is hard to be found in the world.
Of what person?
Of a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[172][olds] Monks, one person born into the world
is an extraordinary man.
What person?

A Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[173][olds] Monks, the death of one person
is to be regretted by many folk.
Of what person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[174][olds] Monks, there is one person
born into the world
who is unique,
without a peer,
without counterpart,
incomparable,
unequalled,
matchless,[42]
unrivalled,
best of bipeds he.[43]
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[175][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the manifestation of a mighty eye.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[176][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the manifestation of a mighty light.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[177][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the manifestation of a mighty radiance.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[178][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the manifestation of six things unsurpassed.[44]
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[179][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the realization of the four branches of logical analysis.[45]
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[180][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the penetration of the various elements.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[181][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the penetration of the diversity of elements.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[182][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the realization of the fruits
of knowledge and release.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[183][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the realization of the fruits
of stream-winning.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[184][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the realization of once-returning.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[185][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the realization of the fruits
of non-return.
Who is that one person?

It is a Tathāgata
who is Arahant,
a fully Enlightened One.

This, monks, is that one person.

[186][olds] Monks, the manifestation of one person
is the realization of the fruits
of arahantship.
Of what person?

[187][olds] Monks, I know not of any other single person
who so perfectly keeps rolling
the wheel[46] supreme of Dhamma
set rolling by the Tathāgata
as doth Sāriputta.

Sāriputta, monks,
is the one who perfectly keeps rolling
the wheel supreme of Dhamma
set rolling by the Tathāgata."

 


[35] Ajjhattikaŋ angan ti karitvā. Cf. S. v, 101; It. 9. Angaŋ (the personal factor) = kāraṇaŋ. Comy. Cf. p. 58 ff.

[36] Bāhiraɱ angaŋ. Comy. on S. v, 101 seems to regard the difference thus: Your own person, hair, nails, cleanliness, etc., are ajjhattikaŋ Your robe, lodging, etc., are bakiraɱ.

[37] Infra, text 58.

[38] Adhammo. Comy. devotes much space to describing how Dhamma may be misinterpreted, and the order in which books of the Tipiṭaks disappear in time to come. Much of this is in the Anāgatavaŋsa (trans. Warren, Buddhism in Translations, p. 481).

[39] Duṭṭhulla, infra, text 88.

[40] Sāvasesa and anavasesa-āpatti. Cf. Mil. 28. Comy. defines it as equal to appaṭikamma- and sappaṭikammāpatti (of the next phrase). The latter ruins the status of a bhikkhu: the former may be atoned for, and he may be reinstated.

[41] Quoted Pts. of Contr. 60; Mil. ii, 56.

[42] Appaṭibhāgo (omitted in our list).

[43] Cf. S. i, 6 (K.S. i, 10).

[44] Anuttariyā: pre-eminence in sight, hearing, possessions, education, service, mindfulness.

[45] Paṭisambhidā: of meanings, causal relations, definitions, wisdom.

[46] Dhamma-cakkaŋ anuppavatteti. Cf. S. i, 101 (K.S. i, 242), where the B. says to Sāriputta: 'Even as the eldest son of a king, whose is the wheel of conquest, rightly turns the wheel as his father hath turned it, so Sāriputta, dost thou rightly turn the wheel supreme of Dhamma even as I have turned it.'


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