Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
IV. Catukka Nipāta
I. Bhaṇḍagāma Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
IV. The Book of the Fours
I: At Bhaṇḍagāma

Sutta 2

Papatita Suttaɱ

Fallen Away

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[2]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, he who possesses not four qualities
is said to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

What four?

He who possesses not the Ariyan virtue
is said to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

He who possesses not the Ariyan concentration
is said to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

He who possesses not the Ariyan wisdom
is said to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

He who possesses not the Ariyan release
is said to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

These are the four qualities
of him who is said to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

But, monks, he who possesses these four qualities is said not to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

What four?

He who possesses the Ariyan virtue
is said to be not fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

He who possesses the Ariyan concentration
is said to be not fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

He who possesses the Ariyan wisdom
is said to be not fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

He who possesses the Ariyan release
is said to be not fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

These are the four qualities
of him who is said to be fallen away from this Dhamma-discipline.

Ceasing they fall, and, falling from one life,
Greedy for life renewed they come again.[1]
Done is the task, enjoyed th' enjoyable:
And happiness by happiness is won.'[2]

 


[1] At Thag. v. 63; Brethr., p. 64; cf. Gotama the Man, 87. Our Comy.'s interp. differs from that on Thag. (where birds of prey pounce, patanti, on fallen flesh (cutā) and pounce greedily again). Here, however, Comy. says: Ye cutā, te patanti: ye patitā, te cutā: cutattā patitā, patitattā cutā ti attho.

[2] I quote Mrs. Rhys Davids's note on Brethr. loc. cit. 'i.e., says the Commentary (ascribed to Dhammapāla): "By the happiness of the attainment of fruition has Nibbāna, which is beyond happiness (or is exceeding great happiness, accanta-sukhaɱ), been won, and by that happiness of insight, which has become a happy mode of procedure, has the bliss of Fruition, of Nibbāna, been reached." The latter interpretation, as Dr. Neumann has pointed out - winning happiness by happiness - is, in the Majjhima-Nikāya (i, 93 f.), contrasted with the Jain point of view: "Nay, friend Gotama, happiness is not to be got at by happiness, but by suffering," - the ascetic standpoint (cf. Further Dialogues, i, 68).' Here our Comy. much less convincingly simply describes a series: 'By human happiness, heavenly happiness: by musing-happiness, the happiness of insight: by this, path-happiness: by path-happiness, fruition-happiness: by this, Nibbāna-happiness is won.'


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