Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
IV. Catukka Nipāta
I. Bhaṇḍagāma Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
IV. The Book of the Fours
I: At Bhaṇḍagāma

Sutta 3

U-N-A-B-R-I-D-G-E-D

Paṭhama Khata Suttaɱ

Uprooted (a)

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[2] [3]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, possessed of four qualities
the foolish,
sinful,
unworthy[1] man
carries about with him
an uprooted,[2]
lifeless self,
is blameworthy,
is censured by the intelligent
and begets much demerit.

What four?

Without test or scrutiny
he speaks in praise of what deserves not praise

Without test or scrutiny
he speaks blaming things deserving praise.

Without test or scrutiny
he shows appreciation
where there should be none.

Without test or scrutiny
when appreciation should be shown
he shows displeasure.

These are the four qualities.[3]

But, monks, possessed of four qualities
the wise,
virtuous,
worthy man
carries about with him
a self not uprooted,
not lifeless,
is not blameworthy,
is not censured by the intelligent
and begets much merit.

What four?

Testing and scrutinizing
he speaks in praise of what deserves praise

Testing and scrutinizing
he speaks blaming things deserving blame.

Testing and scrutinizing
he shows appreciation
where there should be none.

Testing and scrutinizing
he shows displeasure
when displeasure should be shown.

Who praiseth him who should be blamed,
Or blameth who should praised be,
He by his lips stores up ill-luck
And by that ill-luck wins no bliss.
Small is the ill-luck of a man
Who gambling loseth all his wealth.
Greater by far th' ill-luck of him
Who, losing all and losing self,
'Gainst the Wellfarers fouls his mind.
[4] Whoso reviles the Worthy Ones,
In speech and thought designing ill,
For an hundred thousand periods,
For six and thirty, with five more
Such periods, to Purgatory's doomed.[4]

 


[1] A-sappuriso = anariya. Cf. infra, text 32, Ī 31.

[2] Cf. A. i, 105 (of three things); G.S. i; infra, text 84 and Ī222; iii, 139 (of five things). At p. 221 attanā viharati.

[3] As at Ī 83 infra.

[4] These verses are at Sn. vv. 657-60; S. i, 149; A. v, 171; Netti, 132.


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