Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
IV. Catukka Nipāta
I. Bhaṇḍagāma Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
IV. The Book of the Fours
I: At Bhaṇḍagāma

Sutta 5

U-N-A-B-R-I-D-G-E-D

Anusota Suttaɱ

With the Stream[1]

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[5] [4]

[1][than][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, these four persons are found existing in the world.

What four?

The person who goes with the stream,
he who goes against [5] the stream,
he who stands fast,
and he who has crossed over,
has gone beyond;
who stands on dry land, -
a brahmin.

And of what sort, monks, is the person
who goes with the stream?

Here in the world, monks, a certain person
indulges his passions
and does wrong deeds.

This one is called
"a person who goes with the stream."

And of what sort, monks, is the person
who goes against the stream?

Here in the world, monks, a certain person
indulges not his passions,
he does no wrong deed,
but with suffering and dejection,
with tearful face and lamentation
lives the God-life,
complete and utterly fulfilled.

This one is called
"a person who goes against the stream."

And of what sort, monks, is the person
who stands fast?[2]

Here in the world, monks, a certain person,
by destroying the five fetters
that bind to the lower worlds,
is reborn spontaneously,
there meanwhile to pass utterly away,
of a nature to return from that world no more.

This one is called
"a person who stands fast."

And of what sort, monks, is the person
who has crossed over,[3]
gone beyond,
who stands on dry land, -
a brahmin?[4]

Here in this world, monks, a certain person,
by the destruction of the āsavas,
realizes in this very life,
by himself thoroughly comprehending it,
the heart's release,
the release by wisdom,
which is free from the āsavas,
and having attained it
abides therein.

This one, monks, is called
"a person who has crossed over,
gone beyond,
who stands on dry land, -
a brahmin."

These four persons, monks, are found existing in the world.

Whoso give rein to passions, in this world
Not passion-freed, in sense-desires delighting,
These oft and oft subject to birth and eld,
Bondsmen to craving,[5] down the current go.
[6] Therefore the sage, here fixed in mindfulness,
Not following after lusts and evil deeds,
Tho' he may suffer, should abandon[6] passions.
'Tis he, men say, who 'gainst the current goes.

Who hath cast off the five depravities,[7]
A perfect pupil he, that cannot fail,[8]
Master of mind,[9] with faculties subdued,-
He is "the man who standeth fast," they say.[10]
He, comprehending all states, high and low,[11]
In whom all states are quenched, ended, exist not, -
He, knowing all,[12] the God-life having lived,
Is called "world-ender, who hath passed beyond",'[13]

 


[1] Anusota. At Pugg., p. 62.

[2] 'Ṭhitatto = ṭhita-sabhāvo.

[3] Tiṇṇo = oghaɱ taritvā ṭhito. Comy.

[4] Cf. S. i, 47; iv, 174; Dhp. chap. 26 (Brāhmana-vagga) - seṭṭho, niddoso. Comy. Cf. Netti, 157 (ayaɱ asekho).

[5] Taṇhādhipannā = ajjhotthaṭā, ajjhogaḷhā. Comy.

[6] Text paheyya; Itv. 115 (where lines 7 and last two occur); and Sinh. eds. jaheyya.

[7] Text has kilesāni pahāya pañca, but Sinh. ed. kilesāni sahaɱ pahāya.

[8] Text apahāna-dhammo; Sinh. ed. asahāna-dh. (Comy. def. this as aparihīna-sabhāvo).

[9] Ceto-vasippatto, see below, text, p. 36 and Ī 191.

[10] He is anāgāmin. Comy.

[11] Parovarā = uttama-lāmakākusala-kusalā ti. Comy.

[12] Vedagu.

[13] Lokaniagu.


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