Anguttara Nikaya


[Site Map]  [Home]  [Sutta Indexes]  [Glossology]  [Site Sub-Sections]

The Pali is transliterated as IAST Unicode (āīūṃṅñṭḍṇḷ). Alternatives:
[ ASCII (aiumnntdnl) | Mobile (āīūŋńñţđņļ) | Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l) ]

 

Aŋguttara Nikāya
IV. Catukka Nipāta
I. Bhaṇḍagāma Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
IV. The Book of the Fours
I: At Bhaṇḍagāma

Sutta 6

Appasasuta Suttaṃ

Of Small Learning[1]

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
Commercial Rights Reserved
Creative Commons Licence
For details see Terms of Use.

 


[6] [6]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monts, these four persons are found existing in the world.

What four?

One of small learning,
who profits not by his learning:[2]
one of small learning,
who profits by his learning:
one of wide learning,
who profits not thereby:
one of wide learning,
who profits thereby.

And in what way, monks, is a person of small learning
not profited thereby?

In this case, monks, a certain person has small learning in Sutta, Geyya, Veyyākaraṇa, Gāthā, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Jātaka, [7] Abbhutadhammā and Vedalla[3]
yet, as of that small learning
he knows not the letter,
knows not the meaning,[4]
he does not live in accordance with Dhamma.

That, monks, is how a person of small learning
profits not thereby.

And in what way, monks, is a person of small learning
profited thereby?

In this case, monks, a certain person
has small learning in Sutta, Geyya, Veyyākaraṇa, Gāthā, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Jātaka, Abbhutadhammā and Vedalla
but, as of that small learning
he knows both the letter and the meaning,
he lives in accordance with Dhamma.

That, monks, is how a person of small learning
profits thereby.

And in what way, monks, is a person of wide learning
not profited thereby?

In this case, monks, a certain person
has wide learning in Sutta, Geyya, Veyyākaraṇa, Gāthā, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Jātaka, Abbhutadhammā and Vedalla
but, as of that wide learning
he understands neither the letter nor the meaning,
he lives not in accordance with Dhamma.

That, monks, is how a person of wide learning
profits not thereby.

And in what way, monks, is a person of wide learning profited thereby?

In this case, monks, a certain person
has wide learning Sutta, Geyya, Veyyākaraṇa, Gāthā, Udāna, Itivuttaka, Jātaka, Abbhutadhammā and Vedalla
but, as of that wide learning
he understands both the letter and the meaning,
he is profited thereby.

That, monks, is how a person of wide learning
profits thereby.

So these are the four persons found existing in the world.

If one have little learning, and withal[5]
No concentration in his doing,[6] men
Will blame him both in learning and in deeds.

[8] If one have little learning, and withal
Much concentration in his doing, men
Will praise his deeds, his learning not complete.

And if one have much learning, and withal
No concentration in his doing, men
Will blame his deeds, his learning being complete.

And if one have much learning, and withal
Much concentration in his doing, men
Will praise him both for learning and for deeds.

The Buddha's deeply learned follower,
One who is Dhamma-bearer,[7] who is wise
And, like the gold of Jambu,[8] without blame. -
Devas praise him, Brahma too praiseth him.'

 


[1] Appassuto, lit. 'having heard little' (there were no books). At Pugg. 62.

[2] Sutena anuppanno = anupagato. Comy. Lit. 'arisen, come about.' I take it to mean 'has come to nothing.'

[3] Cf. Pugg. 43; Vin. iii, 8; M. i, 133; infra, ĪĪ 102, 186. A late insertion of the ninefold Buddhist Scriptures, not collected at that time, classed according to their contents-viz.: Discourses proper, discourses mixed with verses, expository matter, verses proper, short stories illustrating the 'solemn sayings,' the logia, the birth-stories, the marvels, and certain catechetical suttas. Comy. explains in detail.

[4] Attha-dhamma.

[5] These gāthās are quoted at V.M. i, 48 and trans. by Prof. Mating Tin in Path of Purity, i, 54. The last two lines are at Dhp. 230.

[6] Sīlena asamāhito.

[7] Dhamma-dharo.

[8] Nekkhaṃ Jambonadassa {cf. infra, text 29), pure gold found acc. to some in the Jambu river. Cf. UdA. 416. Comy. jāti-suvaṇṇa: but from the jambu-tree acc. to SA. i, 125 (of an ornament or necklet of sterling gold), def. as mahājambu-sākhāya pavatta-nadiyaṃ nibbattaṃ: mahājambu-palāse vā pathaviyaṃ paviṭṭhe suvaṇṇ'ankurā uṭṭhahanti (somewhat like Vergil's Golden Bough at AEn. vi).


Contact:
E-mail
Copyright Statement   Webmaster's Page