Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāyo
IV. Catukka Nipāto
II. Cara Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter II: Deportment

Sutta 12

Sīla Suttaɱ

Virtue[1]

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[14] [14]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, do ye live perfect in virtue,
do ye live perfect in the performance of the obligations,[2]
restrained with the restraint of the obligations,
perfect in the practice of right behaviour;
seeing danger in the slightest faults,
undertake and train yourselves
in the training of the precepts.

For him who so lives perfect in virtue,
perfect in the performance of the obligations,
restrained with the restraint of the obligations,
perfect in the practice of right behaviour;
seeing danger in the slightest faults,
who undertakes the training of the precepts,
what else remains to be done?

If, as he walks,
coveting-and-ill-will have vanished from a monk;
if sloth-and-torpor,
excitement-and-flurry,
doubt-and-wavering are abandoned;
if his energy be stout and unshaken;
if his mindfulness be established and unperturbed;
if his body be calm and tranquil,
his mind composed and one-pointed, -
a monk become thus
as he walks
is called

"Ardent,
scrupulous,
always and for ever
strong in energy
and resolute."

If, as he stands,
coveting-and-ill-will have vanished from a monk;
if sloth-and-torpor,
excitement-and-flurry,
doubt-and-wavering are abandoned;
if his energy be stout and unshaken;
if his mindfulness be established and unperturbed;
if his body be calm and tranquil,
his mind composed and one-pointed, -
a monk become thus
as he walks
is called

"Ardent,
scrupulous,
always and for ever
strong in energy
and resolute."

If, as he sits,
coveting-and-ill-will have vanished from a monk;
if sloth-and-torpor,
excitement-and-flurry,
doubt-and-wavering are abandoned;
if his energy be stout and unshaken;
if his mindfulness be established and unperturbed;
if his body be calm and tranquil,
his mind composed and one-pointed, -
a monk become thus
as he walks
is called

"Ardent,
scrupulous,
always and for ever
strong in energy
and resolute."

If, as he lies awake,
coveting-and-ill-will have vanished from a monk;
if sloth-and-torpor,
excitement-and-flurry,
doubt-and-wavering are abandoned;
if his energy be stout and unshaken;
if his mindfulness be established and unperturbed;
if his body be calm and tranquil,
his mind composed and one-pointed, -
a monk become thus
as he walks
is called

"Ardent,
scrupulous,
always and for ever
strong in energy
and resolute."

Whether he walk or stand or sit or lie
Or stretch his limbs or draw them in again,
Let him do all these things composedly.
Above, across, and back again returning[3] -
Whatever be one's bourn in all the world[4] -
Let him be one who views[5] the rise and fall
Of all compounded things attentively.[6]
For mind's composure doing what is right,
Ever and always training, - "ever intent" -
That is the name men give to such a monk.'

 


[1] This sutta occurs at Itiv. 118.

[2] Pāṭimokkha. Cf. D. i, 63; M. i, 33; VM. i, 16; Vibh. 244.

[3] Apācīnaɱ - back again.

[4] Jagato gati = lokassa nipphatti. Comy.

[5] Text should read samavekkhitā.

[6] Here Itiv. inserts a line.


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