Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
4. Catukka Nipāta
III. Uruvelā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter III: Uruvelā

Sutta 23

Loka Suttaɱ

The World

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[23] [25]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī at Jeta Grove in Anāthapiṇḍika's Park.

There the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

'Monks, the world[1]
is fully comprehended by a Tathāgata.

From the world
a Tathāgata is released.

Monks, the arising of the world
is fully comprehended by a Tathāgata:
the arising of the world
is abandoned by a Tathāgata.

The ending of the world
is fully comprehended by a Tathāgata:
the ending of the world
is realized by a Tathāgata.

Monks, the practice going to the ending of the world
is fully comprehended by a Tathāgata:
the practice going to the ending of the world
is made to become by a Tathāgata.

Monks, whatsoever in the whole world,
with the world of Maras,
Brahmas,
together with the host of recluses and brahmins,
of devas and mankind,
is seen,
heard,
sensed,
cognized,
attained,
searched into,
pondered over by the mind, -
all that is fully comprehended by a Tathāgata.

That is why he is called "Tathāgata."

Moreover, whatever a Tathāgata utters,
speaks
and proclaims
between the day[2] of his enlightenment
and the day on which he passes utterly away, -
all that is just so[3]
and not otherwise.

Therefore is he called "Tathāgata."

Monks, as a Tathāgata speaks,
so he does:
as he does,
so he speaks.

That is why he is called "Tathāgata."

Monks, in the whole world,
with the world of Devas,
of Maras,
of Brahmas
together with the host of recluses and brahmins,
of devas and mankind,
a Tathāgata is conqueror,
unconquered,
all-seeing,[4]
omnipotent.

Therefore is he called "Tathāgata."

By comprehending all the world
In all the world just as it is,
From all the world is he released,
In all the world he clings to naught.[5]

He is the all-victorious sage:
'Tis he who loosens every bond:
By him is reached[6] the perfect peace
(Nibbāna) that is void of fear.[7]

The Enlightened One, the passion-free,
Sinless, who hath cut off all doubts,
Hath reached the end of every deed,
Freed by removal of the base.[8]

Exalted One, Enlightened he,
The lion he without compare.
For the deva-world and world of men
He caused the Brahma-wheel to roll.

Wherefore the devas and mankind
Who went for refuge to the Seer
Meeting shall pay him homage due,
The mighty one, of wisdom ripe.[9]

"Tamed, of the tamed is he the chief:
Calmed, of the calm is he the sage:
Freed, of the freed topmost is he:
Crossed o'er, of them that crossed the best":

So saying shall they honour him
The mighty one, of wisdom ripe, -
"In the world of devas and mankind
None is there who can equal thee."'

 


[1] Comy. takes loko to mean dukkha-saccaɱ. This Ī occurs at Itiv. 121 [ITI 112-than] with slight differences. Cf. the First Utterance in Vinaya, i, 10; D. iii, 135.

[2] 'Night' acc. to the Indian use.

[3] Tatth'eva.

[4] Añña-d-atthu-dasa, lit. 'come-what-may-seeing.'

[5] Anūpayo (Windisch at Itiv. 122 prefers anūpamo); for anūpaya cf. S. i, 181 = taṇhā-diṭṭhi-upāyehi virahito. Comy.

[6] Text should read phuṭṭhassa, 'gen. for instrumental.' Comy. It is, however, not gen. but dative.

[7] A-kuto-bhaya.

[8] Upadhi, substrate.

[9] Vitasārada, 'free from sprouting again.' Cf. supra on Ch. I, Ī 8; Itiv. 76.


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