Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
4. Catukka Nipāta
III. Uruvelā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter III: Uruvelā

Sutta 30

Paribbājaka Suttaɱ

Wanderers

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[29] [32]

[1][bodh] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Rājagaha on Vultures' Peak Hill.

Now at that time
a great number of notable Wanderers
were in residence
on the bank of the Snake river,[1]
in the Wanderers' Park,
to wit:

the Wanderers Annabhara,
Varadhara,
Sakuludayin[2]
and other notable Wanderers.

Now at eventide the Exalted One,
arising from his solitary [33] musing,
went towards the bank of Snake river,
where was the Wanderers' Park,
and on reaching it
sat down on a seat made ready.

As he sat
the Exalted One said this
to those Wanderers:

Wanderers, these four factors of Dhamma,
reckoned as ancient,
of long standing,
as traditional,
primeval,
pure and unadulterated now as then,
are not confounded
nor shall they be,
are not despised
by discerning recluses and brahmins.

What are the four?

Not-coveting, wanderers, is a factor of Dhamma,
reckoned as ancient,
of long standing,
as traditional,
primeval,
pure and unadulterated now as then,
are not confounded
nor shall they be,
are not despised
by discerning recluses and brahmins.

Not-malice, wanderers, is a factor of Dhamma,
reckoned as ancient,
of long standing,
as traditional,
primeval,
pure and unadulterated now as then,
are not confounded
nor shall they be,
are not despised
by discerning recluses and brahmins.

Right mindfulness, wanderers, is a factor of Dhamma,
reckoned as ancient,
of long standing,
as traditional,
primeval,
pure and unadulterated now as then,
are not confounded
nor shall they be,
are not despised
by discerning recluses and brahmins.

Right concentration, wanderers, is a factor of Dhamma,
reckoned as ancient,
of long standing,
as traditional,
primeval,
pure and unadulterated now as then,
are not confounded
nor shall they be,
are not despised
by discerning recluses and brahmins.

These are the four factors of Dhamma,
reckoned as ancient,
of long standing,
as traditional,
primeval,
pure and unadulterated now as then,
are not confounded
nor shall they be,
are not despised
by discerning recluses and brahmins.

Now, Wanderers, if one should thus object:

Here and for the followings Bhk. Bodhi's understanding would make better sense: "If anyone should say: 'I will reject this Dhamma factor of ~ and point out a [real] ascetic of brahmin who has a mind of ~ (the negative factors)..." Woodward's translation has Gotama proposing an argument that is so simple-minded as to be disrespectful. Unlikely.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

"But I could point to a recluse or brahmin who,
though he has realized[3] this Dhamma-factor of not-coveting,
is nevertheless covetous,
strongly passionate in his desires," -

of such an one I would say:

"Then let him speak out!

Let him utter speech,
and I shall behold his excellence."

Indeed, Wanderers,
it is a thing impossible
that such a recluse or brahmin,
though he has realized this Dhamma-factor of not-coveting,
could be pointed to as covetous,
strongly passionate in his desires.

Again, Wanderers, if one should thus object:

"But I could point to a recluse or brahmin who,
though he has realized this Dhamma-factor of not-malice,
is yet malevolent of heart,
of corrupt thoughts," -

of such an one I would say:

"Then let him speak out!

Let him utter speech,
and I shall behold his excellence."

Indeed, Wanderers,
it is a thing impossible
that such an one,
though he has realized this Dhamma-factor of not-malice,
could be pointed to as malevolent of heart,
as of corrupt thoughts.

Again, Wanderers, if one should thus object:

"But I could point to a recluse or brahmin who,
though he has realized this Dhamma-factor of right mindfulness,
is nevertheless distracted and uncontrolled," -

of such an one I would say:

"Let him speak out!

Let him utter speech,
and I shall behold his excellence."

Indeed, Wanderers,
it is a thing impossible
that such an one,
though he has realized this Dhamma-factor of right mindfulness,,
could be pointed to
as distracted and uncontrolled.

Again, Wanderers, if one should thus object:

"But I could point to a recluse or brahmin who,
though he has realized this Dhamma-factor of right concentration,
is nevertheless not concentrated but flighty-minded," -

of such an one I would say:

"Then let him speak out!

Let him utter speech,
and I shall behold his excellence."

Indeed, Wanderers,
it is a thing impossible
that such an one,
though he has realized this Dhamma-factor of right mindfulness,,
could be pointed to
as not concentrated but flighty-minded.

[34] Now, Wanderers, whoso should think
he ought to censure and despise
these four Dhamma-factors
of not-coveting,
not-malice,
right mindfulness
and right concentration, -
I say that in this very life
four righteous reproaches,[4]
occasions for censure,
come upon that man.

What four?

Thus:

If your reverence despises,
censures the Dhamma-factor of not-coveting,
then (it follows that) those recluses and brahmins who are covetous,
strongly passionate in desires,
must be honoured by your reverence,
must be praised by your reverence.

And if your reverence censures,
despises the Dhamma-factor of not-malice,
then (it follows) that those recluses and brahmins who are malevolent of heart,
corrupt in thought,
must be honoured by your reverence,
must be praised by your reverence.

And if your reverence censures,
despises the Dhamma-factor of right mindfulness,
then (it follows that) those recluses and brahmins who are distracted and uncontrolled
must be honoured by your reverence,
must be praised by your reverence.

And if your reverence censures,
despises the Dhamma-factor of right concentration,
then (it follows that) those recluses and brahmins who are not concentrated
but flighty-minded
must be honoured by your reverence,
must be praised by your reverence.

Indeed, Wanderers, whosoever[5] should think he ought to censure and despise
these four factors of Dhamma,
I say that in this very life
these four righteous reproaches,
occasions for censure,
come upon that man.

Why, Wanderers, even, the men of Ukkala,
Vassa and Bhanna,[6]
who were deniers of the cause,
deniers of the deed,
deniers of reality, -
even they did not judge it fit
to censure and despise
these four Dhamma-factors.

Why so?

Because they feared blame,
attack,
reproach.

[35] Without ill-will and mindful ever,
Who in the self (ajjhattaɱ) is well composed,
Who trains to discipline his greed, -
He is the one called "diligent."'

 


[1] Sappinī: S. i, 153; Vin. Texts, i, 254, n. 2; infra, text 176, where the same Wanderers discuss the 'brahmin truths'; and G.S. i, 168.

[2] The sutta at M. ii, 29 is named after this Wanderer.

[3] Paccakkhāya (ger. of paccakkhāti) means 'by personal experience,' not paṭikkhipitvā as Comy. takes it, for it does not make sense.

[4] Sahadhammikā vādānupātā. Cf. S. ii, 33.

[5] Text should read yo kho.

[6] This para, occurs at S. iii, 72; K.S. iii, 63; Pts. of Contr. 96; M. iii, 78 (which reads Okkalā). Comy. cites the men as types of extreme views. Trans, at K.S. 'Keepers of the retreat (in the rains) and preachers,' which it might mean; but the word Vassa-Bhaññā is probably a doublet, like Sāriputta-Moggallānā, etc.


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