Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
4. Catukka Nipāta
VII. Pattakamma Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours Chapter VII: Deeds of Merit

Sutta 63

Sabrahma Suttaɱ

Equal with Brahmā[1]

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] THUS have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

'Monks, those families where mother and father are worshipped in the home are reckoned like unto Brahma.

Those families where mother and father are worshipped in the home are ranked with teachers of old.

Those families where mother and father are worshipped in the home are ranked with the devas[2] of old.

Worthy of offerings, monks, are those families where mother and father are worshipped in the home.

"Brahma," monks, is a term for mother and father.

"Teachers of old," monks, is a term for mother and father.

"Devas of old," monks, is a term for mother and father.

"Worthy of offerings," monks, is a term for mother and father.

Why so?

Because mother and father do much for children, they bring them up, nourish and introduce them to the world.[3]

Parents are "Brahma" called, "teachers of old,"[4]
Worthy of gifts are they, compassionate
Unto their tribe of children. Thus the wise
Should worship them and pay them honours due.
Serve them with food and drink, clothing and bed.
Anoint their bodies, bathe and wash their feet.
For service such as this to parents given
In this life sages praise a man, and he
Hereafter has reward of joy in heaven.'[5]

 


"Let thy mother be to thee like unto a god! Let thy father be to thee like unto a god! Let thy teacher be to thee like unto a god! Let thy guest be to thee like unto a god!" — Max Müller, SBE, Taittirīyaka-Upanishad, I.11.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

[1] Cf. A. i, 132 = G.S. i, 114; Itv., p. 109 The similar Upanishadic context, Taittirīya 1, 11, 1 (misprinted in G.S. i as ii) runs as follows:

One should not be negligent of duties to devas and fathers:

Become one to whom mother is as deva.
Become one to whom father is as deva;

and so for 'teacher' and for 'guest.' Cf. also Jāt. No. 532.

[2] A. i omits this sentence. Pubbadevā, like pubbapetā, would seem to mean those who have lived on earth (ancestors) and are now worshipped as pitris, whereas petas are still earth-bound. But it may refer to the ancient Vedic gods. Texts have sapubbadevatāni, but Comy. -devakāni.

[3] Dassetāro. Comy. takes this term to mean 'point out objects desirable and undesirable.'

[4] The gāthas are a continuation of those of sutta 32, and the whole poem is at JA. v, 330 (Sona-Nanda-Jātaka).

[5] Cf. S. i, 182.


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