Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
VIII: Apaṇṇaka Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours Chapter VIII: The Sure

Sutta 73

Asappurisa-vadhukā Suttaɱ

Worthy

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Monks, possessed of four things
a man is to be understood
as being unworthy.[1]

What four?

Herein, monks, the unworthy man,
even unasked,
speaks out what is discreditable to another.

What then (would he say) if asked?

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then without reserve or equivocation[2]
he utters dispraise of another
to the full and in all details.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy[3] is an unworthy one."

Then again, the unworthy one,
even when asked,
does not speak out
what is to another's credit;
much less when unasked.

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then with reserve and equivocation
he utters praise of another
grudgingly and in brief.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy is an unworthy one."

[87]Again, monks, the unworthy one,
even when asked
does not speak out
what is discreditable to himself;
much less does he do so when unasked.

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then with reserve and equivocation
he utters grudgingly and in brief
what is to his own discredit.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy is an Unworthy one."

Once more, monks, the unworthy one,
even unasked,
speaks out what is creditable to himself.

What then does he do when asked?

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then without reserve or equivocation
he sings his own praises
to the full and in all details.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy is an unworthy one."

Thus, possessed of these four things
one is to be understood as an unworthy one.

 


 

Now, monks, possessed of four things one is to be understood as a worthy one.

What four things?

Herein, monks, the worthy man,
even unasked,
speaks out what is discreditable to himself.

What then (would he say) if asked?

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then without reserve or equivocation
he utters dispraise of himself
to the full and in all details.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy is an worthy one."

Then again, the worthy one,
even when asked,
does not speak out
what is to his own credit;
much less when unasked.

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then with reserve and equivocation
he utters praise of himself
grudgingly and in brief.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy is an worthy one."

Again, monks, the worthy one,
even when asked
does not speak out
what is discreditable to another;
much less does he do so when unasked.

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then with reserve and equivocation
he utters grudgingly and in brief
what is to another's discredit.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy is an worthy one."

Once more, monks, the worthy one,
even unasked,
speaks out what is creditable to another.

What then does he do when asked?

If, however, he is obliged to speak
on being questioned,
then without reserve or equivocation
he sings another's praises
to the full and in all details.

This, monks, is to be understood
as the meaning of the saying:

"This worthy is an worthy one."

Thus, possessed of these four things
one is to be understood as an worthy one.

 


[1] Asappurisa, cf. A. i, 61; at SnA. 479 = anariya.

[2] Text and Comy. alampetvā; Sinh. text alambetvā (Comy. alampitaɱ katvā?). The word does not seem to occur elsewhere. P.Dict. suggests alambhetvā; cf. palambheti.

[3] Bhavaɱ, sometimes ironical, as here.


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