Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
VIII: Apaṇṇaka Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours Chapter VIII: The Sure

Sutta 78

Dakkhiṇā-Visuddhi Suttaṃ

Gifts[1]

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," replied those monks to the Exalted One.

The Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are these four purities in gifts.

What four?

There is a gift, monks,
which is made pure on the part of the giver,
not of the receiver.

There is a gift, monks,
which is made pure on the part of the receiver,
not of the giver.

There is a gift, monks,
which is made pure on neither side,

There is a gift, monks,
which is made pure on both sides.

Now, monks, how is a gift
made pure on the part of the giver,
not of the receiver?

In this case the giver is virtuous,
of a lovely nature;
the receivers are immoral
and of a wicked nature.

Thus the gift is made pure
on the part of the giver,
not of the receiver.[2]

And how is a gift
made pure on the part of the receiver,
not of the giver?

In this case, monks,
the giver is immoral,
of a wicked nature,
while the receivers are virtuous,
of a lovely nature.

Thus the gift
made pure on the part of the receiver,
not of the giver.

And how is a gift
made pure neither on the part of the giver
nor of the receiver?

In this case, monks,
both giver and receiver are immoral,
of a wicked nature.

Thus the gift
made pure neither on the part of the giver
nor of the receiver.

[91] And how is a gift made pure
both on the part of the giver
and of the receiver?

In this case, monks,
the giver is virtuous,
of a lovely nature,
and the receiver virtuous,
of a lovely nature.

Thus the gift is made pure on both sides.

These are the four purities in gifts.'

 


[1] Cf. D. iii, 231, but in different order; M. iii, 256, which has gāthās on the subject and a fifth set; Pts. of Contr. 322.

[2] Comy. illustrates (i) by Vessantara's gift, JA. vi, 487, and that of Kevaṭṭa to Dīgha-sammatthera; (iii) by that of a hunter at Vaḍḍhamāna, at a peta-dāna. 'Made pure' is explained by Comy. as 'one of great fruit.'


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