Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
IX: M-acala Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours Chapter IX: Unshaken

Sutta 88

Samaṇa-m-acala-putta Suttaɱ

Kinds of Recluses[1] (b)

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, these four persons are found existing in the world.

What four?

The unshaken recluse,
the blue-lotus recluse,
the white-lotus recluse,
and the recluse who is exquisite among recluses.

And how, monks, is a person an unshaken recluse?

Herein a monk, by the wearing out of three fetters is a stream-winner,
of a nature not to go to the downfall,
one assured,
bound for enlightenment.

Thus, monks, is a person an unshaken recluse.

And how, monks, is a person a blue-lotus recluse?

[99] Herein a monk, by utterly wearing out three fetters
and by weakening lust, anger and delusion,
is a once-returner.

Coming back just once more to this world
he makes an end of Ill.

Thus, monks, is a person a blue-lotus recluse.

And how, monks, is a person a white-lotus recluse?

Herein a monk, by utterly wearing out the five fetters
which cause rebirth here,
is apparitionally born,
destined there to pass utterly away,
of a nature not to return from that world.

Thus, monks, is a person a white-lotus recluse.

And how, monks, is a person a recluse exquisite among recluses?

Herein a monk by the destruction of the āsavas,
has reached the heart's release,
the release by wisdom
that is free from the āsavas,
and having realized it
abides therein.

Thus is a person a recluse exquisite among recluses.

These, monks, are the four persons found existing in the world.'

 


[1] These next three suttas seem added afterwards to support the usual definitions of those on the Four Paths. Cf. Ī 7 n.


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