Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
IX: M-acala Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours Chapter IX: Unshaken

Sutta 89

Samaṇa-m-acala-Diṭṭhi Suttaṃ

Kinds of Recluses (c)

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, these four persons are found existing in the world.

What four?

The unshaken recluse,
the blue-lotus recluse,
the white-lotus recluse,
and the recluse who is exquisite among recluses.

And how, monks, is a person an unshaken recluse?

Herein a monk is one of
right view,
right aim,
right speech,
right action,
right way of living,
right effort,
right mindfulness,
right concentration,

Thus a person is an unshaken recluse.

And how, monks, is a person a blue-lotus recluse?

Herein a monk is one of right view,
right aim,
right speech,
right action,
right way of living,
right effort,
right mindfulness
right concentrationhe
right knowledge,
right release..

Yet does he not abide
experiencing with his own person
the eight deliverances.

Thus a person is a blue-lotus recluse.

And how, monks, is a person'a white-lotus recluse?

Herein a monk is one of right view,
right aim,
right speech,
right action,
right way of living,
right effort,
right mindfulness
right concentrationhe
right knowledge
right release,
and he abides experiencing with his own person
the eight deliverances.

Thus a person is a white-lotus recluse.

And how is a person a recluse exquisite among recluses?

Herein a monk when invited
enjoys a plentiful supply of robes,
but he gets little if uninvited;
when invited
enjoys a plentiful supply of alms-food and lodging;
but he gets little if uninvited;
when invited
he enjoys a plentiful supply of requisites
and medicines for use in sickness,
but he gets little if uninvited.

With whatsoever fellows in the holy life he dwells,
their behaviour (towards him)
in action of body, speech and thought
is generally pleasing,
rarely displeasing;
moreover their presents to him
are generally pleasing,
rarely displeasing.

Again, as to those afflictions
which originate from bile,
phlegm,
wind,
from the union of bodily humours,
from changes of seasons,
from stress of circumstances,
from personal assaults,
or from the ripeness of one's karma, -
such do not trouble him much.

He is free from sickness.

As to the four musings
which belong to the higher thought
and lead to happy living
in this very life,
he is a winner of them at will,
without difficulty
and without trouble.

By destroying the āsavas
he reaches the heart's release,
the release by wisdom,
himself comprehending it
in this very life,
and having attained it
he abides therein.

Thus, monks, is a person
a recluse exquisite among recluses.

Now monks, if rightly speaking
[100] one would speak about the recluse exquisite among recluses,
it is just of me that he would rightly use the words.

These, monks, are the four persons found existing in the world.'


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