Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XII: Kesi Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours Chapter XII: Kesi

Sutta 115

Ṭhāna Suttaɱ

Occasions

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

"Monks."

"Yes, lord," they replied, and the Exalted One said:

"Monks, there are these four occasions.

What four?

There is, monks, the occasion when action is unpleasant
and unprofitable to the doer;
that occasion when action is unpleasant
but profitable to the doer;
that occasion when action is pleasant
but unprofitable to the doer;
and the occasion when action is both pleasant
and profitable to the doer.

Now, monks, in the first instance,
in a case when action is both unpleasant
and unprofitable to the doer,
one deems action inadvisable for both reasons,
for it is both unpleasant and unprofitable.

Then again, in the second instance, that is,
when action is unpleasant
but profitable,
one may know who is a fool
and [123] who a wise man
in the matter of manly strength,
manly vigour
and energy.

For, monks, the fool has no such consideration as this:

'Though this is an occasion when action is unpleasant,
yet it is one which brings profit.'

Accordingly he does not act,
and his inaction brings him loss.

But the wise man thus considers:

'Though this is an occasion when action is unpleasant,
yet it brings profit to the doer.'

Accordingly he acts,
and profit results.

Now in the third case
when action is pleasant
but unprofitable, -
in this case also one may know who is a fool
and who a wise man
in the matter of manly strength,
manly vigour
and energy.

For, monks, the fool does not thus consider:

'Though this act is pleasant,
yet it brings loss.'

Accordingly he acts
and the result is loss.

Whereas the wise man thus reflects:

'Though this act is pleasant,
yet its results bring loss.'

So he acts not
and the result is to his profit.

Lastly, monks, in the case
where action is both pleasant
and profitable,
one deems action advisable for both reasons,
for it is both pleasant and profitable;
that is why one deems action advisable.

So these are the four occasions (of action).'


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