Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XVII: Paṭipadā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter XVII: Modes of Progress

Sutta 162

Dutiya Paṭipadā Suttaṃ

[Modes of Progress] In Detail

Translated from the Pali by f. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, there are these four modes of progress.

What four?

The painful mode of progress with sluggish intuition,
the painful mode with swift intuition,
the pleasant mode of progress with sluggish intuition,
the pleasant mode with swift intuition.

These are the four modes of progress.'

And of what sort, monks, is the mode of progress
that is painful
with sluggish intuition?

In this case a certain one is by nature
passionately lustful;
he experiences the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of lust.

Likewise he is by nature
passionately malicious;
he experiences the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of malice.

Likewise he is by nature
passionately infatuated;
he experiences the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of delusion.

In such an one
these five controlling faculties
are dully [154] manifested,
to wit:
the controlling faculty of faith,
the controlling faculty of energy,
the controlling faculty of mindfulness,
the controlling faculty of concentration,
and the controlling faculty of wisdom.

Thus, owing to the dullness of these five faculties,
sluggish is his attainment
of the concentration that follows on[1]
for the destruction of the āsavas.

This, monks, is called
"the progress that is painful
with sluggish intuition."

And of what sort, monks,
is the mode of progress
that is painful
but with swift intuition?

In this case a certain one is by nature
passionately lustful;
he experiences the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of lust.

Likewise he is by nature
passionately malicious;
he experiences the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of malice.

Likewise he is by nature
passionately infatuated;
he experiences the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of delusion.

In such an one
these five controlling faculties
are manifested in abundance,
to wit:
the controlling faculty of faith,
the controlling faculty of energy,
the controlling faculty of mindfulness,
the controlling faculty of concentration,
and the controlling faculty of wisdom.

Thus, owing to the preponderance of these five faculties,
swift is his attainment
of the concentration that follows on
for the destruction of the āsavas.

This, monks, is called
"the progress that is painful
but with swift intuition."

And of what sort, monks,
is the mode of progress
that is pleasant,
but with sluggish intuition?

In this case a certain one
is not by nature passionately lustful;
he does not experience the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of lust.

Nor is he by nature passionately malicious;
he does not experience the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of malice.

Nor is he by nature passionately infatuated;
he does not experience the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of delusion.

But in such an one
these five controlling faculties
are dully manifested,
to wit:
the controlling faculty of faith,
the controlling faculty of energy,
the controlling faculty of mindfulness,
the controlling faculty of concentration,
and the controlling faculty of wisdom.

Thus, owing to the dullness of the five faculties,
sluggish is his attainment
of the concentration that follows on
for the destruction of the āsavas.

This, monks, [155] is called
"the mode of progress that is pleasant,
but with sluggish intuition."

And of what sort, monks,
is the mode of progress that is both pleasant
and accompanied by swift intuition?

In this case a certain one is not by nature passionately lustful;
he does not experience the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of lust.

Nor is he by nature passionately malicious;
he does not experience the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of malice.

Nor is he by nature passionately infatuated;
he does not experience the perpetual pain and dejection
that are born of delusion.

And in such an one these five controlling faculties are manifested in abundance, to wit:
the controlling faculty of faith,
the controlling faculty of energy,
the controlling faculty of mindfulness,
the controlling faculty of concentration,
and the controlling faculty of wisdom.

Thus, owing to the preponderance of the five faculties,
swift is his attainment
of the concentration that follows on
for the destruction of the āsavas.

This, monks, is called
"the mode of progress that is both pleasant
and accompanied by swift intuition."

So these are the four modes of progress.'

 


[1] Ānantariyaṃ (sc. samaāhiṃ). Cf. VM. ii, 675, which quotes our sutta, and Sn. 226:

Yaṃ Buddha-seṭṭho parivaṇṇayi suciṃ||
Samādhiṃ ānantarikaṃ nam āhu.

This failure to attain is due to the hindrances (cf. Expos. i, 244) - i.e., it is difficult for him to give up the lower nature without a great struggle. This painful progress is described in Ī 163.


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