Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XVII: Paṭipadā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter XVII: Modes of Progress

Sutta 164

Catuttha Paṭipadā Suttaṃ

Patient (a)

Translated from the Pali by f. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, there are these four modes of progress.

What four?

'Monks, there are these four modes of progress.

What four?

The mode of progress that is impatient,
that which is patient,
that which tames,
and the mode of progress that calms.

And of what sort, monks,
is the mode of progress that is impatient?

In this case a certain one
reviles again
him that reviles,
insults again
him that insults,
abuses again
him that abuses.

This is called
"the impatient mode of progress."

And of what sort, monks,
is the patient mode of progress?

In this case a certain one
reviles not again,
him that reviles,
insults not again,
him that insults,
abuses not again
him that abuses.

This is called
"the patient mode of progress."

And of what sort, monks,
is the mode of progress that tames?

In this case a monk,[1]
seeing an object with the eye,
is not misled by its outer view
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil, unprofitable states,
might flow in upon one
who lives with the faculty of the eye uncontrolled,
he applies himself to control of the faculty of eye,
sets a guard over the faculty of eye,
attains control over the faculty of eye.

When he hears a sound with the ear,
he is not misled by its outer view
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil, unprofitable states,
might flow in upon one
who lives with the faculty of the ear uncontrolled,
he applies himself to control of the faculty of ear,
sets a guard over the faculty of ear,
attains control over the faculty of ear.

When he with the nose smells a scent,
he is not misled by its outer view
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil, unprofitable states,
might flow in upon one
who lives with the faculty of the nose uncontrolled,
he applies himself to control of the faculty of nose,
sets a guard over the faculty of nose,
attains control over the faculty of nose.

When he with the tongue [158] tastes a savour,
he is not misled by its outer view
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil, unprofitable states,
might flow in upon one
who lives with the faculty of the tongue uncontrolled,
he applies himself to control of the faculty of tongue,
sets a guard over the faculty of tongue,
attains control over the faculty of tongue.

When he with body contacts tangibles,
he is not misled by its outer view
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil, unprofitable states,
might flow in upon one
who lives with the faculty of the body uncontrolled,
he applies himself to control of the faculty of body,
sets a guard over the faculty of body,
attains control over the faculty of body.

When with mind he cognizes mental states,
he is not misled by its outer view
nor by its lesser details.

Since coveting and dejection,
evil, unprofitable states,
might flow in upon one
who lives with the faculty of the mind uncontrolled,
he applies himself to control of the faculty of mind,
sets a guard over the faculty of mind,
attains control over the faculty of mind.

This is called
"the mode of progress that tames."

And of what sort, monks,
is the mode of progress that calms?

In this case a monk admits not
sensual thinking that has arisen.

He abandons,
restrains,
calms it down,
makes an end of it,
forces it not to recur.[2]

So also a monk admits not
malicious thinking that has arisen.

He abandons,
restrains,
calms it down,
makes an end of it,
forces it not to recur.

So also a monk admits not
harmful thinking that has arisen.

He abandons,
restrains,
calms it down,
makes an end of it,
forces it not to recur.

He does not admit evil,
unprofitable states
that occur from time to time;
he abandons them,
restrains,
calms them down,
makes an end of them,
forces them not to recur.

This, monks, is called
"the mode of progress that calms."

So these are the four modes of progress.'

 


[1] Cf. K.S. iv, 63.

[2] Cf.. Ī 114 above.


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