Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XVII: Paṭipadā Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter XVII: Modes of Progress

Sutta 166

Chaṭṭha Paṭipadā Suttaɱ

In Further Detail[1]

Translated from the Pali by f. L. Woodward, M.A.

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[1] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Sāvatthī.

Then the Exalted One addressed the monks, saying:

'Monks.'

'Yes, lord,' they replied, and the Exalted One said:

'Monks, there are these four modes of progress.

What four?

The mode of progress that is painful
with sluggish intuition,
the mode of progress that is painful
with swift intuition,
the mode of progress that is pleasant
with sluggish intuition,
and the mode of progress that is pleasant
and accompanied with swift intuition.

Now here, monks, the mode of progress that is painful
with sluggish intuition
is reckoned low[2] in both respects,
both as regards its pain
and its sluggishness.

That is how it is reckoned low in both respects.

Then again, monks,
the mode of progress that is painful
with swift intuition
is reckoned low in respect of its being painful.

Then again, monks,
the mode of progress that is pleasant
with sluggish intuition
is reckoned low in respect of its being sluggish.

Yet again, monks, the mode of progress that is pleasant
with swift intuition
is reckoned excellent in both respects,
both as regards its pleasantness
and its swiftness.

Thus it is reckoned excellent in both respects.

So these are the four modes of progress.'

 


[1] Ref. to Ī 162.

[2] Hīna.


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